Skip Navigation

Courses

Filter By

Courses

Found 3621 courses
IDSEM-UG9150 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

BUENOS AIRES: Art and Politics in the City: New York and Buenos Aires

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. This course brings together students in New York and Buenos Aires to examine how urban arts and politics intersect in the Americas: How are art and politics understood and expressed differently and similarly in these two American metropolises and why? How do shared aesthetic features of public art in the city reflect the global circulation of urban creative modes? What do we learn about local politics from looking at the art and writing on a city’s public spaces? Teams of students in both cities will conduct field work in selected neighborhoods to help create an archive of murals, graffiti, performances, and installations. Then, drawing from readings in history, art criticism, and urban studies, as well as from census and electoral data and using GIS technology, we will analyze how social and political processes like gentrification, inequality, and planning generate and reflect creative political expression as captured in our database, culminating in transnational, collaborative projects that explore what the art and writing of city streets reveals about urban life in 21st century America.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1485 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

Beyond Picture Perfect: Personal Choice in a Digital World

4 units Mon Tue Wed Thu
2:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Jeff Day

Description

This course covers the very basic techniques of photography and digital imaging. Beyond Picture Perfect explores the many choices available to today’s image makers. New technology combined with traditional photographic techniques will be addressed, enabling the students to realize their distinctive image-making vocabulary. Daily discussions include understanding hardware mechanics, choosing a personal color palette, and recognizing “your” unique composition key. We will debate the many analog and digital tools available to photographers vital to their artistic expression. These concepts will be supported by daily assignments and class critiques culminating in a final project portfolio. Students with interest in analog or digital formats will be encouraged to develop an understanding of their medium and form an original visual strategy. Museum/ gallery visits and field trips for on-location photographing will inspire students to create their own way of seeing. Readings may include selections from: Robert Adams,  Why People Photograph ; London and Upton,  Photography .

Notes

This course is for beginners only, covering the very basic techniques of photography and digital imaging.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1029 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

Creating Drama from Character, in Collaboration with The New Group

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM
Ian Morgan

Description

For 20 years, renowned Off-Broadway theatre company The New Group has been premiering and producing character-driven, ensemble-based work. This course will immerse students in the company's approach, which emphasizes character and intimate, visceral ensemble work. Students will jointly develop new performance work through group improvisation and playwriting, while also studying multiple processes and theories of developing a new ensemble-based theatrical work for performance, taking playwright/director Mike Leigh's "improvised play" as a particular model. The course, led by Associate Artistic Director Ian Morgan, will feature master classes from New Group artists, including Artistic Director Scott Elliott.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1752 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

This Mediated Life: An Introduction to the Study of Mass Media

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM
Julian Cornell

Description

This interdisciplinary seminar will provide an intensive introduction to the study of mass media. Utilizing wide ranging critical and theoretical methodologies, the course will consider how media alternately reflects and forms our sense of politics, economics, race, gender, sexuality and citizenship. The course will be concerned with questions such as: What function does mass media serve for society? How does a media saturated cultural environment shape our identity? How do mass media forms delineate and naturalize prevailing ideologies and ways of being in the world? Can media provide a means to challenge cultural and political hegemony? Readings will be drawn from Berger’s Media Analysis Techniques as well as the anthologies The Media Studies Reader and Gender, Race and Class in the Media and the course will include excerpts from the films The Dark Knight Rises, The Matrix, The Truman Show, Network, Idiocracy and Catfish, television shows 60 Minutes, Family Guy, The Simpsons, South Park and The X-Files, as well as a selection of other media forms, including blogs, podcasts, radio programs, graphic novels, newspapers, magazines, music videos, social media sites and video games.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1542 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

Motown Matrix: Race, Gender and Class Identity in "The Sound of Young America"

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

In the 1960s Motown Records emerged as a dominant force in American popular music. Billing itself as “The Sound of Young America,” Motown established a lyrical and musical discourse through its records and albums that struck a responsive chord with white and black listeners alike. In this seminar we examine the race, gender and class identity that is inherent in—and emerges from—“The Motown Sound.” How did this company exploit the nationalist pride in the African American community while simultaneously positioning itself as a “crossover” enterprise to whites? What models of business and community did Motown emulate and create? And how did Motown affect the politics and racial discourse of its listeners? Our exploration situates Motown in the Detroit community of the 1950s and 1960s, to understand how it was “imagined,” and its impact on the wider culture. Readings may include excerpts from  The Origins of the Urban Crisis  by Thomas Sugrue;  One Nation Under a Groove  by Gerald Early;  Where Did Our Love Go?  by Nelson George;  American Odyssey  by Robert Conot;  Dancing in the Street  by Suzanne E. Smith;  Just My Soul Responding  by Brian Ward, and  Detroit: I Do Mind Dying  by Dan Georgakas and Marvin Surkin. The lyrics of Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, and Holland-Dozier-Holland as well as such films as  Standing in the Shadows of Motown  and  Dream Girls  may be included.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1698 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
EARLY
WI 2017

The Social Contract: Early Modern European Political Theory

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
2:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Justin Holt

Description

What holds a society together? This course will explore one influential answer to this foundational question within philosophy and social theory, namely social contract theory as it developed within early modern European political philosophy. Modern assumptions about the relationship between individual and society, private property and ownership, rationality, economics and the market, and rights and responsibilities of citizenship have all been shaped by social contract theory. But, even though this theory has enjoyed great influence, it has been severely criticized as unrealistic and biased towards individualism and property holders. We will read the foundational social contract works in this course and try to understand their assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses. The works to be read will include: Hobbes' De Cive, Locke's Two Treatises of Government, and Rousseau's The Social Contract.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1572 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Writing for Television II

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Imani Douglas

Description

This workshop focuses on the writer as an individual in the often daunting, sometimes humbling "collaborative" world of TV writing. In this workshop, we work on capturing the voices, rhythm, and style of varied classic TV hits, while executing class writing assignments. Students test their discipline, motivation, and ingenuity as they complete their very own "spec script" of a show of their choice, presently on the air. Readings may include  How to Write For Television  by Madeline Dimaggio,  The Sitcom Career Book  by Mary Lou Belli and Phil Ramuno, and selections from  Story  by Robert McKee and  How to Write a Movie in 21 Days  by Viki King. Students are required to work in Final Draft software for class projects.

Notes

This course is open to students with a serious interest in the craft of television. This writing-intensive workshop is modeled on the industry, requiring strict adherence to deadlines and mandatory attendance.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1439 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

James Reese Europe and American Music

units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

This course will examine the impact of James Reese Europe (1880-1919) on the development of American music in the early twentieth century. An innovative musician and conductor, Europe organized and conducted the first jazz concerts at Carnegie Hall (1912-1914), founded an African American music school, and served as a collaborator with Irene and Vernon Castle, who made social dancing a world-wide rage. During World War I, James Reese Europe led the all-black “Hellfighters” 15th Infantry Band, which performed throughout France and offered Europeans their first exposure to ‘le jazz hot.’ Readings may include  A Life in Ragtime: A Biography of James Reese Europe  by Reid Badger; excerpts from  The Unknown Soldiers: African-American Troops in World War I  by Arthur E. Barbeau and Florette Henri;  From Harlem to the Rhine  by Arthur W. Little;  Black Manhattan  by James Weldon Johnson; and  They All Played Ragtime  by Rudi Blesh and Harriet Janis. Sound and film recordings will also be utilized.

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, First Class: January 27; Last Class: March 10.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG1925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/tutorial-proposal.html Description: Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include "Creating a Magazine," "Dante's Literary and Historical Background," and "Environmental Design." Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Tutorial Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: December 1. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Internship

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/internship-proposal.html Description: Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between their academic interests and related industries, and between academic theory and practical experience. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own internships as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship placement site, students are expected to attend two workshops; submit journal reflections about their internship experiences; write a mid-semester progress report describing the status of the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Internship Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: January 27. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students registering for an Internship for the first time are required to attend two workshops: Workshop I: Thursday, February 2, 12:30-1:30pm or Thursday, February 9, 12:30-1:30pm; Workshop II: Thursday, March 23, 12:30-1:30pm or Thursday, March 30, 12:30-1:30pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

IDSEM-UG1925 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Food and Nature in Cities

4 units Wed
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Jacob Remes

Description

What is the proper place of nature and agriculture in cities? How do cities shape nature, and vice versa? Where do—and where should—city-dwellers get their food? “Concrete jungles” (as opposed to “real” ones) often seem to be purely human-built, unnatural places where things are made and consumed, not grown. But the place of nature in cities, and our relationship to it, has long been contested. When we look at food in relationship to urban centers, we end up seeing far beyond the questions of what we eat and where we get it. The proper place of nature in cities is at the heart of many contemporary debates over urban policy, including food and agriculture, land use, disaster policy, and immunization. In this class, we will think historically and critically about these debates both in the past and in contemporary cities, focusing, though not exclusively, on North America, especially New York. Readings will include William Cronon, Ted Steinberg, Catherine McNeur, Katherine Leonard Turner, and others.

Notes

Section 002 for Environmental Studies majors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1639 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or EARLY
SP 2017

Witch, Heroine, Saint: Joan of Arc and Her World

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Andrew Romig

Description

In May 1431, Joan of Arc, the Maid of Orléans, was burned at the stake as a heretic and a witch by an English partisan court after the French nobility had betrayed her. An illiterate peasant girl just sixteen years of age, she had led the French back from the brink of defeat and saved the French monarchy from ruin. Yet in death, she would gain further power still as a martyr and symbol of indomitable French will and resistance. In this seminar, we will study Joan’s complex historical moment and her place within the long history of medieval women, Christian mysticism, and religious fanaticism. We will trace the stories of her appearance and military success, attempt to hear her voice in the extant transcript of her heresy trial, analyze contrasting French and English narratives about her life, and explore how she became the national heroine, patron saint, and political symbol that she is today. Texts will include Christine de Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies, Catherine of Siena’s Dialogues and Letters, Thomas of Cantimpré’s Life of Christina the Astonishing, and Shakespeare’s I Henry VI. We will also analyze and discuss modern renditions of the Joan of Arc story by such diverse artists as Mark Twain, George Bernard Shaw, Bertolt Brecht, Carl Theodor Dreyer, and Luc Besson.

Notes

Same as HIST-UA 569

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9354 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Babel

4 units
Todd Porterfield

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PARIS. How might we examine the myth of Babel to test assumptions about belonging and separateness? The construction of the Tower and its destruction by God, who then covered the earth with uncomprehending multitudes, would seem to be a story of uniformity, ambition, and then essential difference, of architecture, power, identity, language, and geographic spread. For thousands of years and from the Bible to the Early Modern to today, it seems to haunts us in architectural and imperial ambitions, in film and mass media, in high and contemporary art, in dystopian nightmares about globalization, in novels of authoritarian repression and novellas of spell-binding imaginings of freedom and connectedness. In this seminar we will analyze many of its figurations in Biblical and archaeological scholarship, literature, art and architectural history, film and visual studies, linguistics, philosophy, politics, and history. The subject leaves few alternatives but to broach the culture, politics, and philosophy of living together, and so we will explore some possible alternatives in peace and hospitality, in translation and in embracing the incompetence of language. Amongst the authors encountered, there will be Borges, Derrida, Gideon, Goethe, Huntington, Kafka, Kant, Mirzoeff, and Wordsworth.

Notes

Same as IDSEM-UG 1869. Students who have taken IDSEM-UG 1869 (Babel) will not receive credit for IDSEM-UG 9354. Course is not repeatable.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1858 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Female Body in Contemporary Visual Culture

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Elena Wang

Description

In light of pressing popular debates over the valuing of female bodies and female beauty in social and political life, this course explores the dominant visual paradigms that shape female embodiment today. Taking the glamorous figure of the runway model as our point of departure, we will put into dialogue the material and representational dimensions of model bodies, considering the different kinds of labor entailed by the female body’s insistent commodification, and exploring its psychosocial costs. Critical and feminist literature will help us read recent films, ethnographies and journalistic accounts of female body work, while weekly current events presentations enrich our discussions. Texts include Iris Marion Young’s  On Female Body Experience ,   Zygmunt Bauman’s  Wasted Lives , and Freud’s seminal 1917 essay, “Mourning and Melancholia.”

Notes

formerly titled "Couture Culture: Sexual Politics on the Runway"

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/private-lesson-proposal.html Description: Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Private Lesson Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: January 27. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

SASEM-UG9201 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

FLORENCE: Topics in 19th Century Literature: Italy and Italians in English Literature from the Romantics to Modernism

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. Romantic, Victorian, and Modernist writers in both Britain and the United States were fascinated by Italy. The "Italy and Italians" of the title refers not only to images and characters in the works of the British and American authors we will be reading but also to their affinities with Italian literature. Recurring themes in the course will be history and its uses in literature, gender and sexuality, democracy and aristocracy, language and power, and religion as an instrument of sexual repression.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

CORE-GG2028 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Proseminar: The Past in the Present: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Eugene Vydrin

Description

The past is… An enabling tradition? A stifling burden? A repetition compulsion? A revolutionary imperative? Each of these by turns or all at once, the idea of the past figures centrally in the work of thinkers across disciplines and mediums: philosophers and psychologists, historians and social theorists, poets, painters, and filmmakers. This proseminar, aimed at the needs and interests of students embarking upon the Gallatin MA, offers an introduction to a series of influential theories and methods in the humanities and social sciences by exploring and comparing their conceptions of the past and its effects on the present and the future. The past is an unquiet ghost haunting theoretical texts as well as the literary and visual artworks they illuminate and that have inspired them. With the presence of the past as our guiding thread, we will read and closely analyze classic and modern texts (in fields ranging from philosophy and cultural theory to literature, painting, and film, to anthropology, sociology, and historiography); map major theoretical and political positions within these texts and artworks; develop a shared critical vocabulary; and formulate the urgent and intractable questions that motivate these texts and provoke our responses to them. Our texts may include essays and books by Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Woolf, Stein, Du Bois, Benjamin, Césaire, Foucault, Said, Gilroy, and Morrison. Students will play a major role in navigating our readings, steering our discussions, and choosing the topics we address. In addition to writing short responses and a midterm paper, students will conduct a critical research project on a relevant topic of their own choosing that will culminate in a 15-20 page final paper.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335, or Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403, are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ARTS-UG1577 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Contemporary U.S. Playwriting

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Kristoffer Diaz

Description

This arts workshop combines the academic study of some of the most important recent dramatic works in the United States with an interdisciplinary approach to the artistic adventure of writing new short plays. Students will read work from ten prominent contemporary playwrights (among them Lynn Nottage, Annie Baker, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Rajiv Joseph, and Robert O'Hara), then respond with short dramatic pieces inspired by those texts. Significant focus will be placed on drawing connections with great books and concepts being discussed in students’ other coursework and how those texts may inform the plays we are reading. The class may include a trip to an Off-Broadway show and/or visits from some of the assigned playwrights. Additional readings may include non-play texts by Sarah Ruhl, Jose Rivera, and Anne Bogart.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ELEC-GG2510 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Critic vs. Cliché

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Ben Ratliff

Description

“Cliches invite you not to think,” wrote the literary critic Christopher Ricks, “but you may always decline the invitation.” Cliches can be bad for language, thought, and action, in that they serve efficiency and an abstract idea of power, and lead the user away from the truth. But we all use them, and to avoid them entirely may be impossible. Which makes the work of the cultural critic, part of whose job is to locate and question them wherever they occur, that much trickier and deeper. In this advanced writing seminar, we will move toward a sophisticated relationship with the cliche. What is the difference between cliche and idiom, meme, hype, tradition, archetype? Where do they live and breed? What do they accomplish? If, as Adam Phillips says, “cliches are there to stop us being suspicious,” can they be much more than a writer’s bad habit--can they be used for bullying and societal oppression? We will read criticism which notices the use of cliches (or received wisdom) in culture, by Gerald Early, Hannah Arendt, Margo Jefferson, and others, as well as some fiction (Paul Beatty’s novel The Sellout) and satire; and writings on the subject of the cliche itself by critics, linguists, sociologists and others (Christopher Ricks, Orin Hargraves, George Orwell). Students will write critical essays in response to the readings, as well as to current cultural or social events, paying special attention to how cliches function in the subject itself and the discourse around it.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (bpr212@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1918 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2017

Truth in Narrative: Race and Slavery in the Atlantic World 1600-1900

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Carolyn Arena

Description

This seminar investigates first-person narratives of slavery from the perspective of adventurers, novelists, former slaves, abolitionists, and slave owners from the early modern period (c1500-1900). Audiences from that period, and historians alike, have doubted some of these accounts as exaggerations. 17th-century dramas, like Aphra Behn's  Oroonoko  and John Smith's  History of Virginia , have been novelized or romanticized for commercial appeal, yet nevertheless contain undeniable truths about the experience of slavery. 18th- and 19th-century accounts from former slaves, such as Mary Prince and Olaudah Equiano, have been challenged as sensationalized by those in favor of slavery, who doubted that former slaves could become such eloquent writers, and suggested that white abolitionists had ghost-written them instead for their own political gain. This class will discuss how racism influenced these accusations, and how their central message of slavery's brutality can be confirmed, rather than rejected, using memoirs by slave-holders themselves. This course uses these sources to trace the trajectory of New World slavery from its origins in the Mediterranean, to the enslavement of both Native Americans and Africans shipped throughout the Atlantic, to the development of slavery as a racialized institution through colonial legal codes, and finally, to Abolition movements leading up to the American Civil War. The course will focus on the discussion of the aforementioned narratives plus other narratives and film adaptations like Solomon Northup's  Twelve Years a Slave , with short lectures contextualizing each work in colonial and international history.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1050 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Performing Stories: East Meets West

4 units Wed
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Lanny Harrison

Description

In this course we create characters inspired by history, memory, dreams and world lore through challenging exercises that fuse Eastern contemplative traditions and Western theatrical improvisation. Students learn how to access different aspects of themselves to enhance their own creative process and create a uniquely authentic theatre. Each session begins with vocal exercises and physical warm ups, based on Taoist exercises and Western dance techniques. Our character work starts with meditations and visualizations employing the Buddhist tradition of "mindfulness/awareness" practice, in which we place ourselves totally in the present moment. We work in solos, duos and groups, gradually adding costumes, props and music. Open to theater students, dancers, musicians, visual artists, writers, techies—all those interested in discovering their own source of deep invention. Readings include Chögyam Trungpa's  Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior and Dharma Art  (now titled True Perception), Louise Steinman's  The Knowing Body , Ethan Nichtern's  One City  and John Welwood's  Ordinary Magic  and Pema Chodron's  The Wisdom of No Escape .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG784 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Museums and the Politics of Space

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Melissa Turoff

Description

The concepts of “cultural heritage” and “historic preservation” are capacious, including natural resources, man-made artifacts, monuments, folklore, myth, and tradition. Most importantly, these concepts connect the past, present and future within a coherent narrative. The construction of this narrative is itself an ideologically and politically charged process. This course explores how and where this process occurs. How does it manifest itself in the spaces of museums, archaeological digs, sacred spaces, and tourist destinations? And how do these sites shape communities or nations? This seminar traces how global imperial projects of preservation and plunder filled the museums of London, Paris, and Rome. We explore how museums become contested sites of postcolonial nation-building, historical reckoning, and as a means of integrating traumatic events into our historical consciousness. Combining insights from history, museum studies, architecture, and urbanism, we examine how “cultural heritage” and “historic preservation” relate to museums. In what ways can museums be understood as political spaces shaped by national, colonial, and postcolonial forces? How do colonial and postcolonial politics shape the processes of curation and “museumification?” We also visit museums in New York to discuss the power dynamics behind “museumification” in our own city. More informal writing assignments culminate in two formal research projects. The aim of assignments throughout the seminar is to hone critical thinking and writing skills, to disentangle concepts of “heritage,” and to explore how museums helped build civilizations, empires, and modern-day nations. Readings may include Sir Walter Scott, John Ruskin, Pierre Nora, Michel Foucault, Eric Hobsbawm, Benedict Anderson, David Harvey, Susan Crane, Tapati Guha-Thakurta, Nezar AlSayyad, and Alexander Stille.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

LEAVE-XX11 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Course reduction-Other

0 units
Section 022

Nina Katchadourian

Description


Type

Leaves and Sabbaticals (LEAVE-XX)

IDSEM-UG1856 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Politics, Ethics and Aesthetics of Photography

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Sonia Werner

Description

The seminar begins with a critical history of photography, and a consideration of the technology’s advent as something of a misfit art, before focusing on its increasing use as an instrument of visual evidence. We turn then to a series of case histories, from the early use of photography as a forensic tool at 19th century crime scenes, to the counter-forensic visual reconstructions of contemporary drone strikes in Pakistan, or recent police violence against unarmed civilians of color in the US. In each instance we ask how photography shapes what becomes visible or legible as violence, and what kinds of suffering—and what modes of resistance—move different spectators affectively, ethically, and politically. The seminar will rely on key theoretical works on photography as well as more recent critical interventions that help us reckon the use of surveillance and its neoliberal logics (Cole, Farocki, Steyerl, Weizman). How might the ubiquity of cameras inure or blind us to photography’s work? The seminar seeks to help students better understand the complex linkages between perception and understanding, and how photographs, as the modern visual form par excellence, shape our sense of the political world and our place in it.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

LEAVE-XX11 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Course reduction-Other

0 units
Section 037

Dianne Ramdeholl

Description


Type

Leaves and Sabbaticals (LEAVE-XX)

IDSEM-UG9200 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

FLORENCE: History of Italian Fashion

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. Students trace the birth, evolution, decline, revival, and most recent developments of Italian fashion from the Late Gothic Age to the present "made in Italy" design. Italian fashion styles are decoded in relation to art history in an international, social and economic context. Fashion and its connections with culture, subculture, gender and communication are emphasized. On-site visits also illustrate the dominating role of Florence in fashion from its origin until now. Conducted in English.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

PRACT-UG1301 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Practicum in Fashion Business

4 units Tue
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Tracy Gardner, Lise Friedman

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/fashion-practicum.html Description: The fashion industry’s need to balance the conflicting demands of specialization and globalization requires innovative approaches that connect creativity, design and business. This course considers the dialogue surrounding ways the fashion business can meet these demands by linking aesthetic goals to financial plans. The course is designed to provide students interested in the fashion industry with an opportunity to develop their understanding of various approaches to bridging the gap between design and business. The course will combine hands-on group projects and case studies with interdisciplinary readings in business and design history, consumerism, merchandising and the business of fashion. The course will be taught by the Guess Distinguished Visiting Professor in Fashion and Fashion Business, and by a member of the Gallatin faculty. Admission is by permission of the Visiting Professor.

Notes

Permission required. Application deadline: Monday, October 24th, 5:00 pm. For more information and to apply, please click on course title and then link to application.

Type

Practicum (PRACT-UG)

IDSEM-UG1457 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2017

The Odyssey: Estrangement and Homecoming

2 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Laura Slatkin

Description

One of the two foundational epics of so-called Western Culture, the  Odyssey  features a wily hero whose journeys are extraordinary and whose longing for home is unbounded. The  Odyssey  offers a complex meditation on brotherhood, bestiality, sexuality, kinship, and power; it is the great epic of cross-cultural encounter, in all its seductive and violent aspects, as well as the great poem of marriage. An adventure in nostos (homecoming), the  Odyssey  shows us the pleasures and dangers of voyaging among strangers. Constantly exploring the boundaries between the civilized and the savage, the poem offers as well a political critique of many ancient institutions, not least the family, patriarchy, hospitality customs, and the band-of-brothers so central to epic ideology. And as a masterwork of narrative art, the  Odyssey  asks us to consider the relation of fiction to “truth.” We will explore these and other matters in the  Odyssey , and may make some concluding forays into contemporary re-workings of Odyssean themes and characters.

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, First Class: January 25; Last Class: March 8.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1700 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2017

Becoming "Global" in the Early Modern World

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Valerie Forman

Description

Over and over, we are told that the world we live in is becoming increasingly global, that all its parts are connected to one another; and goods, people, culture, and information can move from one place to another, seemingly without barriers. Yet how true are these claims? And how new are the phenomena these claims describe? Scholars have pointed to the middle of the sixteenth century as the moment when the economy became global, and the age of exploration and colonization began to connect many parts of the world to each other in a complex network that included and radically reimagined forms of cooperation, piracy, and slavery. This course will explore what kinds of global consciousness developed in the early modern period in negotiations with these transformations. Some of our central questions include: to what extent did early modern people begin to imagine and experience the world globally, that is, as an entity whose regions were interdependent? Which groups of people began to experience it globally? How were things, places, and persons, not seen before categorized or valued? What influence did global encounters have on ideas about gender, sexuality, class, religion, and citizenship and on social and economic practices? What new kinds of narratives about the world developed in relation to the challenges of participating in it? Finally, to what extent is globalization a “western” phenomenon or a sign of modernity? We will investigate a wide variety of primary works, including travel narratives, plays, poems, ethnography, film, engravings, and globes. We will also read secondary works by literary scholars, anthropologists, and historians of labor, the economy, and science. Many of these works also put the past and present in conversation with each other in compelling ways. While many of the primary works originate in “Europe” or the Americas, we will also study a range of works that challenge the Eurocentric view of globalization that was emerging and still dominates much of contemporary discourse of globalization.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 721 006.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1560 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Introduction to Dramatic Writing: The Short Play

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Darrel Alejandro Holnes

Description

In this arts workshop we will learn the basics of playwriting by examining the work of Aristotle as well as plays by major writers including Anton Chekov, Oscar Wilde, and others. Our goal will be to develop and revise a short play through a variety of writing exercises and techniques and the study of plays in  24 Favorite One-Act Plays  and the  Best 10-Minute Plays of 2014 . This course will also feature guest lectures by a diverse group of working playwrights and theater professionals and the viewing of a Broadway and Off-Broadway show. Upon completing this course you will have a working body of short dramatic writing and learn how to submit your work to student and professional festivals and contests worldwide.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1644 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Art, Activism, and Beyond

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Amin Husain

Description

This workshop interrogates the relationship between art and activism by focusing on (1) the Occupy Wall Street movement; (2) the Gulf Labor Coalition and Global Ultra Luxury Faction (G.U.L.F.), the direct action wing of Gulf Labor Coalition; (3) the Direct Action Front for Palestine in NYC; and (4) the Black Lives Matter movement. These case studies, alongside course readings and discussions, will help us to situate contemporary art in a historical and political context—a moment of rupture that is informed by ongoing histories of racism, colonialism, and debt. We will then move on to question how this moment might inform our own art practice, interrogating how, as contemporary artists, we might produce art that does not simply add flair to political work, but that engages in a dialectical practice--moving between theory and research, as well as action and aesthetics--and that considers how practice and process might become the work itself. A major component of the course will be a project that students plan and execute during the semester. Choice of practice and medium will be open, but possibilities might include work that is performative, visual, or conceptual, employing photography and/or digital media, text, film, painting, or sculpture. Readings will include: Berardi,  After the Future ; Breton,  What is Surrealism? ; Caws,  Manifesto: A Century of Isms ; Cesaire and Kelly,  Discourse on Colonialism ; Hardt and Negri,  Declaration , and McKee,  Strike Art! Contemporary Art and the Post-Occupy Condition .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1603 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Modern Poetry and the Actual World

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Lisa Goldfarb

Description

Although lyric poetry is the art of language that we reserve for the expression of the emotional dimension of our human experience, lyric poets also importantly use the forms and conventions of their art to respond to the shape and substance of the world they inhabit; that is, the historical, political, and physical aspects of the world—the “actual world”—in which they live. This course has two principal aims: first, to help us to develop skills in the reading of lyric poetry, and, second, to consider the complex relation between lyric poetry and the actual world. In the first half of the class, we will study the forms and conventions of lyric poetry and work on developing our poetic sensibilities. In the second half, we will focus our attention on the relationship of modern poets to the concrete or actual world and focus our study on W.H. Auden and Wallace Stevens, two poets who address the pressing questions of their day, and the world they shared, in strikingly different ways. Yet, however different their approaches, both poets ponder questions of faith and secularity, consider heroism and loss in a century marked by war, and probe our human relationship to nature in answer to an increasingly industrialized and technological world. Readings will include texts that consider how to read lyric poetry (Hirsch, Vendler, Perloff), a representative selection of modern lyric poetry (Eliot, Pound, Valéry, Éluard, Apollinaire, Moore, H.D., Bishop, Hughes, Brooks, Rich), the works of Auden and Stevens (essays and poems), as well as the philosophical, historical and political narratives to which they refer and that inform their work (Freud, Nietzsche, William James, Santayana).

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1507 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Writing About American Comedy

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Saul Austerlitz

Description

Writing about comedy is a treacherous affair, and one that raises numerous intractable questions: What is comedy? What path has it carved out for itself over the past century? And how do we write about it? This advanced writing course will survey the story of American comedy in all its multifarious formats—the sitcom, the film comedy, the stand-up act, the variety show— while also serving as a workshop for cultural criticism that goes deeper than the recap. Utilizing a combination of reading, viewing, live performances, and workshopping, this course will sharpen students’ skills as writers by exposing them to the wide range of American comedy from Charlie Chaplin to “Key & Peele,” with units on African-American comedy, women in comedy, political comedy, and self-aware comedy, among others. In this course, we will wrestle with the complexities of writing about comedy, including, but not limited to, the question of whether being funny about what’s funny is a faux pas or a necessity. Writing assignments will offer students the opportunity to learn about the craft of cultural criticism by attending a stand-up show and writing a review, writing about a work of comedy that makes you uncomfortable, and other prompts. Readings will include essays by Clive James, Emily Nussbaum, James Agee, Jonathan Rosenbaum, Wesley Morris, Roxane Gay, and others.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

ELEC-GG2675 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Vibrant Matters

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Eugenia Kisin

Description

How does matter—generally thought of as the inert stuff of nature, acted upon or animated by humans—come to  matter  in the social, political, and ecological senses of the word? This seminar explores recent approaches to materiality across art, anthropology, feminist theory, and political ecology, an interdisciplinary constellation of scholarship often called the “new materialism.” Proceeding from political theorist Jane Bennett’s rendering of vibrancy as a thingly agency bound up with social justice, this course is an invitation to work critically with this formation in a transcultural way. We will interrogate the “newness” of the new materialism, situating its histories and genealogies in earlier phenomenological approaches to matter, while exploring its alternative lineages and contestations. Students will apply the new materialism’s diverse methodological tools for theorizing things and networks to their own practices and projects. Emphasizing graduate-level reading skills, our discussions will be based primarily on several recent book-length texts, which we will work to situate within the new materialism and within their authors’ own disciplinary lineages. In addition to Bennett’s  Vibrant Matter , these texts may include Bill Brown’s  Other Things,  Natasha Myers’  Rendering Life Molecular , Spyros Papapetros’s  On the Animation of the Inorganic , and Anna Tsing’s  The Mushroom at the End of the World .

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (eugenia.kisin@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1771 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Promise and Pitfalls of Markets

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Ngina Chiteji

Description

In his classic text, the Wealth of Nations, the Scottish economist and moral philosopher Adam Smith argued that the human propensity to "truck, barter and exchange" would naturally lead to socially optimal outcomes if people were left to trade freely, without any government interference in markets. This idea that a competitive market can lead to efficient outcomes is a central tenet of economic theory today. Moreover, the more general belief that markets know what's best is widely held throughout U.S. society. This course is designed to teach students about what economics has to offer to the analysis of markets and the ways that firms make decisions. It also will include analyses of market outcomes from scholars in disciplines outside economics,  and   some   discussion of firms' ethical obligations .  In its exploration of these topics, the course draws largely on disciplines such as economics, sociology, moral philosophy, and the law.  Readings may include texts such as the following: Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich,  Winner-Take-All Markets by Robert Frank, and The Globalization Paradox by Dani Rodrik .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1910 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Habits of Reading: Narrative and Genre in Europe and America

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Karen Hornick

Description

“Myth,” “novel,” “epic,” “thriller,” “romantic comedy”—why do people bother making these distinctions between types of narratives, and how do we make them? From defining self (“I’m a sci-fi geek”) to organizing society (“only kids read comic books”), genres help us make sense of what we read and perform artistic, social, personal, and commercial functions. In this class we will closely examine stories representing a wide range of Western genres--an ancient epic, fairy tales and folktales, a Shakespearean tragedy, a novel, a novella, a short story, one modern 3-act play (a comedy), television shows, a classic Hollywood film, an "art" film, a video game "narrative," a graphic novel, perhaps even narrative painting and photography. In addition to helping us consider genre in relation to authorial intention and reader response, our survey will enable us to address contemporary questions about readership, fan fiction, and interactivity. When and why do we find it necessary to classify our stories into categories, and who benefits? How do genres reflect and contribute to the cultures that produce them? How do media shape genre and vice verse? How has genre constrained and inspired European and American authors? How do narrative genres prompt distinctions between fiction and truth, affect taste judgements, and shape opinion?

Notes

Open to sophomores only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1564 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Advanced Poetry Writing

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Scott Hightower

Description

A workshop designed for serious poets, this class teaches students how to take their writing to another level both intellectually and artistically; depth of theme, imagination, and craft are discussed. Emphasis is placed on developing and strengthening one’s personal style and voice. Through workshopping, students further refine their critical abilities as poets and readers. The class includes exercises and readings. Submission of work will be discussed and encouraged.

Notes

Prerequisite WRTNG-UG 1560 or CRWRI-UA 817 or CRWRI-UA 830 or permission of instructor. Students may take Advanced Poetry Writing two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1826 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

(Dis)Placed Urban Histories

4 units Fri
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Rebecca Amato

Description

Neighborhood change comes in many varieties. Mid-twentieth century urban renewal in U.S. cities brought bulldozers and tower-in-the-park housing developments to dozens of poor neighborhoods considered ripe for revision. Early-twenty-first century gentrification, meanwhile, has brought high-end commerce and affluence to areas once occupied by low-income and working class communities. In the Melrose section of the South Bronx, a series of changes have influenced the streetscapes and lives of residents. Rampant arson in the 1970s and 1980s destroyed acres of the neighborhood, for example, while migrants from Puerto Rico and immigrants from the Dominican Republic, West Africa, and Bangladesh, among others, settled in the remaining homes of Melrose to build new lives in a new city. Most recently, federal dollars have been earmarked for Melrose’s reconstruction and redevelopment. This course, offered in partnership with the Bronx-based community empowerment organization WHEDCo, invites students to become activist historians whose objective is to learn what histories are at risk of being silenced or displaced as the South Bronx changes. Students will conduct archival and secondary research; produce collaborative oral histories with neighborhood residents and business owners; and meet with activists who are working to protect the interests of the current community of Melrose. The course will culminate in an on-line archive and a physical, history-based exhibit to be co-produced with neighborhood residents and displayed in a publicly accessible, outdoor park. Readings may include Jonathan Mahler’s  Ladies and Gentlemen the Bronx is Burning  and Jill Jonnes’s  South Bronx Rising .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG1701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/private-lesson-proposal.html Description: Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Private Lesson Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: January 27. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/tutorial-proposal.html Description: Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include "Writing Long Fiction," "Dante's Literary and Historical Background," and "Environmental Design." Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Tutorial Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: December 1. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

FIRST-UG701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Aesthetics in Context

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Christopher Trogan

Description

Philosophical aesthetics is naturally concerned with problems pertaining to the arts in general, but there are issues that must also be examined within the context of the particular arts. This course will begin with an examination of broad issues in aesthetics: What is art? What is beauty? What is the sublime? Is there such a thing as “good taste?” We will then consider particular issues within the context of painting, photography, film, architecture, music, literature, and the popular arts (specifically popular music, television, and video games). Some questions posed will be the following: What does it mean for a painting to be “about” or to “express” something? How should we think of photography—as a means by which we can actually see things and people in situations that no longer exist or as simply a means of registering the world? What is it about film that gives the medium its peculiar illusion-making power? Can architecture ever be considered a “pure” art form? What exactly is music? Does it represent and express in the same way as other art forms? What is literature? Do the literary arts have a special relationship to the arousal of emotion? What value is there in the popular arts and what ethical issues arise along with them? Readings will be drawn from Benjamin, Danto, Eco, Gombrich, Greenberg, Heidegger, Kant, Kivy, Langer, Nehamas, Plato, Scruton, and others. In addition to contributing regularly and actively to class discussions and activities, students will be required to compose frequent responses and reflections, write two formal essays (4-5 pages each), present a research proposal, and complete a final research paper (8-10 pages).

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

SASEM-UG9403 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

PRAGUE: Central European Film

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. This interdisciplinary seminar is designed to discuss and question the identity of specific nations in European space, which has always been a fascinating crossroad of ideas and ideologies as well as the birthplace of wars and totalitarian systems. The course will cover masterpieces of Russian, Hungarian, German, Polish and Czech cinematography, focusing on several crucial periods of history, in particular WWII and its aftermath, showing moral dilemmas of individuals and nations under the Nazi regime as well as revealing the bitter truth of the Stalinist years.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1823 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

In with the Old, Out with the New: Debates on "Tradition" in Western Music

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Kwami Coleman

Description

Contests between stalwart custodians of “tradition” and rebels searching for new, untested modes of expression pervade Western music history. This course surveys some of the most contentious debates on music’s past, present, and future waged between music theorists, critics, artists, and audiences, spanning the last five hundred years. Our focus is on the seemingly inevitable tension between what music is, what it should be, and what it can be. Starting with the Greek philosophers of antiquity, we explore debates on the music of Claudio Monteverdi, Ludwig van Beethoven, Richard Wagner, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, John Cage, Bob Dylan, and The Slits. We also examine the backlash against and subsequent defense of styles like jazz, rock and roll, punk rock, and rap. Our goal is to better understand how culture is “made” ​precisely ​during ​these ​moments of charged debate, where a particular music’s perceived merits​ or transgressions serve as the pretext for larger ​often controversial ideological issues. Art, in this sense, becomes a platform by which to observe how competing aesthetic value​ systems​ reveal deep social and cultural rifts. This class meets twice a week. Our first session is devoted to scrutinizing and discussing primary sources​:​ letters, newspaper and magazine articles, journal entries, sound recordings, and film. For our second session we read and discuss secondary sources by scholars, critics, and investigative journalists for context, using this new information as a way to think critically about the primary sources and our own aesthetic judgments. Debating music tradition and innovation, as we shall see, is a long-standing tradition in its own right.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1212 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

World Dance

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Kathryn Posin

Description

Dance reflects cultural heritage and is a key to understanding diverse societies. In this arts workshop, students explore dance as it appears on several continents. Dance can be seen as encoded forms of a society's religious, artistic, political, economic, and familial values. Readings cover issues of globalization, fusion and authenticity. Migration, missionaries, trade routes and the diaspora have led to the creation of new dance forms like "Bollywood" and "Tribal" that are a synthesis of earlier forms. Students are introduced to different dance forms through selected readings, rich collection of video footage and studio practice often lead by various guest artists. After a brief warm-up, the class learns simple steps, floor plans and rhythms from the music and dance cultures being studied. Students choose a dance form as their project and themselves become researchers, performers and creators of new forms.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1772 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2017

Music and Civic Culture: Ancient and Modern

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Bruce King

Description

This course examines the role of music theory and musical performance in the formation of community, actual and utopic. We will begin our study with the musical, mathematical, and mystical thought of Pythagoras and his followers in the short-lived utopian community of Croton: How is “the Music of the Spheres” a paradigm both for ethical action within the community and for the progress of the soul within the cosmos? From Croton, we will turn to debates about music and civic culture in fifth-century democratic Athens: What forms of music and poetry sustain and subvert citizens and states? Is there a particularly “democratic” form of music? (Readings from Aeschylus, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plato, and Aristotle.) From ancient Greece, we will then turn to the late-nineteenth century efforts of Wagner, partially inspired by Athenian tragedy, to create the “Total Work of Art” in his Ring cycle of music-dramas and in the festival at Bayreuth; we will also read Nietzsche’'s (and Adorno’'s) responses to Greek tragedy and to Wagner. Finally, we will consider some twentieth-century experiments in music and art, especially those associated with Fluxus and with New York City (e.g., John Cage, Steve Reich, La Monte Young, Yoko Ono, The Velvet Underground), in dialogue with our earlier readings.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9550 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

TEL AVIV: Sexualities of the Middle East: A Cultural History

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-TEL AVIV. Questions of sexuality are central to the public debate on the Middle East. Scholars, politicians and journalists are engaged intensively with issues such as Islamic laws of modesty, persecution of LGBT Arab countries, and the separation of men and women within religious communities in Israel. To comprehend these questions, one must understand the sociological and cultural characteristics of contemporary Middle Eastern communities, but also the historical development of sexual attitudes in this area. In the present era, the Middle East is seen as a space of sexual repression and even "Sexual misery." However, this was not always the case. Since the late 18th century, European powers tightened their military, political and economic grip of the East – from Egypt to India. Europe has established its superiority over "The Orient" through the representation of this diverse territory as backward, fanatical and religious. But simultaneously, the East was an object of desire, including sexual desire. European travelers, scholars and intellectuals characterized the Orient as a space of unlimited sexual freedom. Ironically, while in the past, the West condemned the Muslim world’s alleged sexual licentiousness, the modern West today criticizes the Muslim repression of sexual freedoms. The course will tackle those questions from a historical perspective. Applying methodologies of queer theory, it will discuss the complex history of sexuality in the Middle East and sketch the genealogy of Western attitudes towards both Arab and Jewish sexuality, with a focus on LGBTQ. Relying on theorists and historians like Michel Foucault, Khaled El-Rouayheb, Samar Habib, and Joseph Massad, we will explore the essential role that sexuality in general, and the queer issue in particular, plays in the contemporary politics of the region.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s  The Art of Travel , Urry’s  The Tourist Gaze,  MacCannell’s  The Tourist , and Leed’s  The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: travelstudies.org.

Notes

Permission of the instructor required (ssh1@nyu.edu). Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site. Due to local restrictions on what are considered to be online courses, this course is not available to students studying at NYU London, NYU Madrid, or NYU Accra.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

500

Cannot serve request to /content/gallatin/en/academics/courses.html on this server


ApacheSling/2.2 (Day-Servlet-Engine/4.1.52, Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM 1.7.0_79, Linux 2.6.32-642.6.2.el6.centos.plus.x86_64 amd64)
SASEM-UG9150 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017