Skip Navigation

Courses

Filter By

Courses

Found 860 courses
IDSEM-UG1752 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

This Mediated Life: An Introduction to the Study of Mass Media

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM
Julian Cornell

Description

This interdisciplinary seminar will provide an intensive introduction to the study of mass media. Utilizing wide ranging critical and theoretical methodologies, the course will consider how media alternately reflects and forms our sense of politics, economics, race, gender, sexuality and citizenship. The course will be concerned with questions such as: What function does mass media serve for society? How does a media saturated cultural environment shape our identity? How do mass media forms delineate and naturalize prevailing ideologies and ways of being in the world? Can media provide a means to challenge cultural and political hegemony? Readings will be drawn from Berger’s Media Analysis Techniques as well as the anthologies The Media Studies Reader and Gender, Race and Class in the Media and the course will include excerpts from the films The Dark Knight Rises, The Matrix, The Truman Show, Network, Idiocracy and Catfish, television shows 60 Minutes, Family Guy, The Simpsons, South Park and The X-Files, as well as a selection of other media forms, including blogs, podcasts, radio programs, graphic novels, newspapers, magazines, music videos, social media sites and video games.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1542 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

Motown Matrix: Race, Gender and Class Identity in "The Sound of Young America"

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

In the 1960s Motown Records emerged as a dominant force in American popular music. Billing itself as “The Sound of Young America,” Motown established a lyrical and musical discourse through its records and albums that struck a responsive chord with white and black listeners alike. In this seminar we examine the race, gender and class identity that is inherent in—and emerges from—“The Motown Sound.” How did this company exploit the nationalist pride in the African American community while simultaneously positioning itself as a “crossover” enterprise to whites? What models of business and community did Motown emulate and create? And how did Motown affect the politics and racial discourse of its listeners? Our exploration situates Motown in the Detroit community of the 1950s and 1960s, to understand how it was “imagined,” and its impact on the wider culture. Readings may include excerpts from  The Origins of the Urban Crisis  by Thomas Sugrue;  One Nation Under a Groove  by Gerald Early;  Where Did Our Love Go?  by Nelson George;  American Odyssey  by Robert Conot;  Dancing in the Street  by Suzanne E. Smith;  Just My Soul Responding  by Brian Ward, and  Detroit: I Do Mind Dying  by Dan Georgakas and Marvin Surkin. The lyrics of Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, and Holland-Dozier-Holland as well as such films as  Standing in the Shadows of Motown  and  Dream Girls  may be included.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1698 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
EARLY
WI 2017

The Social Contract: Early Modern European Political Theory

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
2:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Justin Holt

Description

What holds a society together? This course will explore one influential answer to this foundational question within philosophy and social theory, namely social contract theory as it developed within early modern European political philosophy. Modern assumptions about the relationship between individual and society, private property and ownership, rationality, economics and the market, and rights and responsibilities of citizenship have all been shaped by social contract theory. But, even though this theory has enjoyed great influence, it has been severely criticized as unrealistic and biased towards individualism and property holders. We will read the foundational social contract works in this course and try to understand their assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses. The works to be read will include: Hobbes' De Cive, Locke's Two Treatises of Government, and Rousseau's The Social Contract.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1867 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
SP 2017

Global Noodles: Silk Routes & Subway Connections

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Jack Tchen

Description

Is this just an excuse to eat lots of noodles. Yes, it is! This basic research course is immersive education in the most delicious, fully embodied sensate, and legal way possible. Along the way, you’ll learn about the secret ingredient to noodle making, the oldest noodle, Italian or Chinese?, and what Genghis Khan did for modernity. And yes this course is also historical and sopping in critical cultural theory, you can tell your parents, as a way to learn about cross-cultural communication challenges, intermingled spaces, and embodied knowledges and practices. We will examine the historical and ongoing impacts of the silk route latitudinal and longitudinal movements throughout Central Asia on the vernacular cultures of global cities, such as the migrant friendly neighborhoods New York City. Part of what is unarticulated yet implied by global cities is the compression of longue durees of times/spaces in one distinctive time/space. Besides slurping for mouth feel, understanding family broth recipes, and storytelling practices, we’ll be documenting, making, analyzing, and appreciating the worlds of noodle practices and conveying our collaborative findings using the latest in mapping apps. Readings and films will include: work by Chef Ken Hom,  The Silk Road: A New History of the World ,  Cuisine & Empire: Cooking in World History , essays from affect studies, and the use of CartoDB mapping software. Prerequisites – still loving  Tampopo  (1985) after three viewings, having comfy but stylish walking shoes, and purchasing two monthly Metro Cards.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 380 001. In order to register, students enroll in the lecture, IDSEM-UG 1867 001, and then select one of the recitations, IDSEM-UG 1867 002 or IDSEM-UG 1867 003.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1867 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
SP 2017

Global Noodles: Silk Routes & Subway Connections

4 units
Section 002
Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

Is this just an excuse to eat lots of noodles. Yes, it is! This basic research course is immersive education in the most delicious, fully embodied sensate, and legal way possible. Along the way, you’ll learn about the secret ingredient to noodle making, the oldest noodle, Italian or Chinese?, and what Genghis Khan did for modernity. And yes this course is also historical and sopping in critical cultural theory, you can tell your parents, as a way to learn about cross-cultural communication challenges, intermingled spaces, and embodied knowledges and practices. We will examine the historical and ongoing impacts of the silk route latitudinal and longitudinal movements throughout Central Asia on the vernacular cultures of global cities, such as the migrant friendly neighborhoods New York City. Part of what is unarticulated yet implied by global cities is the compression of longue durees of times/spaces in one distinctive time/space. Besides slurping for mouth feel, understanding family broth recipes, and storytelling practices, we’ll be documenting, making, analyzing, and appreciating the worlds of noodle practices and conveying our collaborative findings using the latest in mapping apps. Readings and films will include: work by Chef Ken Hom,  The Silk Road: A New History of the World ,  Cuisine & Empire: Cooking in World History , essays from affect studies, and the use of CartoDB mapping software. Prerequisites – still loving  Tampopo  (1985) after three viewings, having comfy but stylish walking shoes, and purchasing two monthly Metro Cards.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 380 002. In order to register, students enroll in the lecture, IDSEM-UG 1867 001, and then select one of the recitations, IDSEM-UG 1867 002 or IDSEM-UG 1867 003.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1867 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
SP 2017

Global Noodles: Silk Routes & Subway Connections

4 units
Section 003
Thu
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM

Description

Is this just an excuse to eat lots of noodles. Yes, it is! This basic research course is immersive education in the most delicious, fully embodied sensate, and legal way possible. Along the way, you’ll learn about the secret ingredient to noodle making, the oldest noodle, Italian or Chinese?, and what Genghis Khan did for modernity. And yes this course is also historical and sopping in critical cultural theory, you can tell your parents, as a way to learn about cross-cultural communication challenges, intermingled spaces, and embodied knowledges and practices. We will examine the historical and ongoing impacts of the silk route latitudinal and longitudinal movements throughout Central Asia on the vernacular cultures of global cities, such as the migrant friendly neighborhoods New York City. Part of what is unarticulated yet implied by global cities is the compression of longue durees of times/spaces in one distinctive time/space. Besides slurping for mouth feel, understanding family broth recipes, and storytelling practices, we’ll be documenting, making, analyzing, and appreciating the worlds of noodle practices and conveying our collaborative findings using the latest in mapping apps. Readings and films will include: work by Chef Ken Hom,  The Silk Road: A New History of the World ,  Cuisine & Empire: Cooking in World History , essays from affect studies, and the use of CartoDB mapping software. Prerequisites – still loving  Tampopo  (1985) after three viewings, having comfy but stylish walking shoes, and purchasing two monthly Metro Cards.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 380 003. In order to register, students enroll in the lecture, IDSEM-UG 1867 001, and then select one of the recitations, IDSEM-UG 1867 002 or IDSEM-UG 1867 003.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9251 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

LONDON: Art and War, 1914-2004

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. This 15 week course will take an in-depth yet wide-ranging look at an important but curiously neglected aspect of modern western visual culture. Within a broadly chronological structure, topics to be dealt with will include the following: the relationship between art and atrocity, and the attendant problem of the aestheticisation of horror; the crucial influence of photography and the growth of mass communications; the issue of censorship, both external and internal, and the related issue of the "limits of representation" (above all, in relation to the Holocaust and Hiroshima); the distinction between official and unofficial war art, and between art and propaganda, between art that endorses and even glorifies war and an art of protest; issues of gender and sexuality; questions of cultural memory and the memorialization process, and the representation of war in contemporary art practice. It will consist of a combination of informal lectures, student presentations, at least one gallery visit, and the occasional film showing.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1727 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2017

Plato's Apology

2 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Laura Slatkin

Description

‘Corrupting the youth’ of Athens? Virtue in action? Threat to the body politic? Model citizen? Plato’s Socrates presents a conundrum for ancient and modern thought. In his brilliant dialogue, the  Apology , Plato recreates Socrates’ defense of himself at his trial in 399 BCE for (among other things) ‘corrupting the youth’ of his city. The  Apology  sits at the intersection of law, politics, philosophy, religion, erotics, and pedagogy. In this course, we read the  Apology  closely, exploring it as philosophical reflection, courtroom oratory, literary text—and as gripping drama. Supplementary readings address: intellectual milieu, historical and political context, questions of genre.

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, First Class: January 24; Last Class: March 7. Open to juniors and seniors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9250 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

LONDON: Seeing London's Architecture

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. London, like New York is a rich and complicated city. Unlike New York however, it has been continuously occupied for just under 2000 years. Almost every epoch of London’s history can be detected in the city’s architecture and distinctive streetscape. This course is designed to work in three ways. Firstly it is an opportunity to learn about London’s architecture and art by physically exploring it. Secondly this class is an introduction to sketching and keeping a travel notebook, a basic and useful skill that any liberal arts student should have an experience of. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, this course teaches how to 'read' a town or city. The ability to visually make sense of European built-environment should really help in understanding the architecture of New York City and, of course, town and cities throughout the United States, and anywhere else.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1859 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Modern Poetry and the Senses

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Lisa Goldfarb

Description

In a letter that he wrote to his Cuban correspondent, Jose Rodriguez Feo, Wallace Stevens referred to Marcel Proust as a poet. “It seems like a revelation,” Stevens wrote of Proust, “but it is quite possible to say that that is exactly what he was and perhaps all that he was.” Proust’s masterpiece,  In Search of Lost Time , is often considered for the way it challenged and enlarged the form of the 20th century novel, as well as for the author’s meticulous exploration of the workings of time, history, memory, psychology, and the senses. Yet, it is more unusual to study Proust as a poet, or for his impact on modern poetry. In this course, therefore, we begin our study of the presentation and importance of the senses in modern poetry with Proust (via portions of  In Search of  Lost Time) . Proust will then serve as prelude to our examination of the various ways that modern poets respond to, follow, and reach beyond him in their use and portrayal of the senses (and, by extension, time and memory). Contextual materials may include, among other texts, Bergson’s "Introduction to Metaphysics" and Susan Stewart’s  Modern Poetry and the Fate of the  Senses . Primary readings include portions of Proust’s  In Search of Lost  Time , and poetry and essays of Valéry, Eliot, Pound, Moore, Bishop, Auden, Stevens, and Brooks.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9254 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

LONDON: Fashion, Culture, and the Body

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON: This is a course that explores the relationship between ideas, the body and the way that fashion can be understood to mediate between the two. Through a range of disciplines and media this course considers the body as an aspect of not only medical and scientific exploration, but crucially as a vital element of culture and society. Bodies affect the ways in which the social world and power relations are organized, and they even arguably condition the way that we understand reality itself. Our physical form is constantly shaped according to both philosophies and fashions. Body ideals and broader ideals often interrelate strongly through bodily practices and with what we wear. There are meanings and fashions in all bodily forms (skinny, buxom, muscular, ideas of ‘whiteness’) and body practices (dieting, hair management, cleansing rituals, plastic surgery and genital cutting). Over the sessions, we will take a conceptual approach to fashion, as a strident condition of modern life, that incorporates politics, science and aesthetics and we will closely read a number of cultural texts against a number of theoretical models. Attitudes towards the body can vary widely according to historical period, and this course will explore how, in different moments, and via different media, we have been preoccupied with the aesthetics of different body zones, with displaying identity (gender, class and ethnicity), and also with power. Different cultural forms (literary, visual, material etc) will provide the focus of our discussions as they all engage with the different ways that we make meaning out of our bodies. Students will be invited to investigate in their written work set texts from class in addition to primary material of their own choice.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1870 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2017

Going Baroque: Baroque Theater, from Ambiguity to Hyperbole

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Simon Fortin

Description

Mannered, adorned, elaborate, grand, exaggerated, eccentric, reactionary—these are all qualities often associated with the Baroque aesthetic, a complex artistic movement that swept the European continent from the late sixteenth to the early eighteenth centuries. While the Baroque may accommodate such descriptions, it also refuses the fetters of definitions. In this course, we examine the controversies that animate the use of the term “Baroque”: How did an aesthetic of grandeur come to inform architecture, politics, religion, the visual arts, and specifically for our intent, the theater? How might the Baroque period be considered a living tension between  Ambiguity , a quality we associate more closely with the Renaissance, and  Hyperbole , understood here as excessive dogmatism? We look at texts that embrace, but also denounce, the Baroque aesthetic turn, and we try to understand how this appetite for grandeur, for excess, for unbridled expressivity still mediates the sensibilities of our post-modernity.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1590 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Walter Benjamin: Theory for Gleaners

4 units
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM

Description

Long before the advent of green politics, and before recycling and repurposing became fashionable, there were people surviving with little fanfare on discards, and theorists meditating on the revolutionary possibilities of refuse and junk. This seminar introduces students to the work of Walter Benjamin, who is both a central figure in critical theory and an early, powerful commentator on the politics and aesthetics of trash. We begin with Agnès Varda’s film The Gleaners and I, and explore the relation between theory and the recycling of ideas, images, and objects, especially those that have been overlooked or abandoned. As a refugee himself, Benjamin knew intimately how whole populations can be dispossessed or cast off. Following his thought, we ask what displaced subjects and discarded objects might teach us about the larger economies of capitalism, modernity and the city, but also about human desire, need and frailty. Our primary text is Benjamin's expansive and unfinished work of citations and brief commentaries, The Arcades Project (1927-1940), but we will read Freud, Marx, and the Frankfurt School to contextualize the work historically and theoretically. What did Benjamin make of dross, and what can we glean from his thought for our own times?

Notes

Same as COLIT-UA.866.001

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1535 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

Narrating Memory, History and Place

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Marie Cruz Soto

Description

This course examines how people imagine a place of their own through narrations of the past. The past, after all, is a contested terrain open to divergent interpretations that shape common understandings of places. The meanings bestowed on places dictate who can use them, and how. Thus, the ways through which people narrate the past can transform places. This course, therefore, explores the broad interplay between narrations of memory, history and place. It focuses, however, on the politics of historical narrations in struggles of disempowered communities to claim a place of their own. Course readings include literary and other scholarly texts like Jamaica Kincaid’s  A Small Place , Michel-Rolph Trouillot’s  Silencing the Past  and Michel De Certeau’s  The Practice of Everyday Life  as well as writings by Edward Said, William Cronon, Diana Taylor, Steven Hoelscher and Doreen Massey.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 721 007.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9252 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

LONDON: History of British Fashion

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON: This interdisciplinary seminar serves as a broad overview for several centuries of British male and female fashion trends, from roughly the Tudor period to today. The course focuses on ways that modes and standards of dress evolved in response to political, economic and technological developments; empire and immigration; changing gender and class formations; and the vagaries of popular culture. In short, the course examines not only what people wore at different historical moments, but why they wore what they did, and how they felt about it. Readings come from the fields of literature, history, art history, gender studies, and sociology.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1904 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2017

Descartes

2 units Wed
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Andrea Gadberry

Description

This course is a seven-week introduction to the major philosophical works of René Descartes (1596-1650). As we read Descartes’ writing, we will study some of the concepts his work is best known for, among them, radical doubt, mind-body dualism, and the “I” created by his famous formula  cogito ergo sum , or “I think therefore I am.” We will take an interdisciplinary approach to our study of Descartes, valuing careful close readings of the texts and putting Descartes’ thought in conversation with literary works of the period (Calderón and Shakespeare, for instance). At the same time, we will look ahead to some of Descartes’ more recent interlocutors, examining the debates of twentieth-century thinkers responding to Cartesian questions.

Notes

Course meets during the last seven weeks only, First Class: March 22; Last Class: May 3.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1907 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Literature of Environmental Crisis

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Gregory Vargo

Description

What does it mean for literature to engage with political and ethical concerns about the degradation of the environment? Ranging from such literary and environmental classics as Rachel Carson’s  Silent Spring  and John Steinbeck’s  The Grapes of Wrath  to contemporary science fiction, this course will look at the way literature changes when it addresses unfolding environmental crisis. We’ll ask whether and how the novel, a form adapted to narrating the story of individual lives, can be stretched to represent broad social formations, long-term ecological processes, and abstract political and philosophic positions. How can the “slow violence” of climate change take narrative shape given that it is a process unfolding over centuries? How can writers approach a topic as vast as the Anthropocene—the great sixth age of mass extinctions in which human industry has become a force on par to catastrophic geologic events? How can the myriad and far-flung relationships of global capitalism be instantiated in fictional form? Can non-human species be given voice in language or image? What can science writing borrow from literary art to make technical debates accessible and compelling to a wide audience? Is there a way to write about environmental crisis that also preserves space for human agency—and therefore hope? We’ll look at a variety of media and genres which artists have utilized to criticize the present and imagine alternative futures: science fiction, situationism, a graphic novel, social problem fiction, poetry, anarchist manifestos, environmental essays and documentary film. Probable readings include: Margaret Atwood,  The Year of the Flood ; Paolo Bacigalupi,  Pump Six ; Rachel Carson,  Silent Spring ; Paul Chadwick,  Concrete: Think Like a Mountain ;   Paul Greenberg,  Four Fish ; Jim Hansen,  Storms of my Grandchildren ; Eizabeth Kolbert,  The Sixth Extinction ; Ricky Laurentiis,  Boy with Thorn ; Bill McKibben,  The End of Nature ; Lydia Millet,  How the Dead Dream ; Ken Saro-Wiwa,  A Month and a Day: A Detention Diary ; Bill Talen,  What Should I do if Reverend Billy Is in My Store? ; Indra Sinha,  Animal’s People ; Justin Taylor,  The Gospel of Anarchy ; Jesmyn Ward,  Salvage the Bones ; Alan Weisman,  The World without Us .

Notes

Same as ENGL-UA 252.003. Section 002 for Environmental Studies majors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1664 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
SP 2017

Omens and Oracles: Reading the Future and Retaining the Past in Early China

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Ethan Harkness

Description

When ancient Chinese kings seared sacred bones with fire, reading the future from the resulting cracks went hand in hand with creating archival records to preserve the past. In this class, we will explore several interrelated early Chinese divination traditions through classical texts, archaeology, and recently excavated manuscripts. In all cases we will pay attention to the complex interplay between past, present, and future, including aspects of the history of writing, the history of the book, and the interwoven histories of science and religion. After starting with a discussion of the above-mentioned oracle bones, we will proceed to examine the enigmatic  Yijing  ( Book of Changes ), the earliest and most revered of all the Chinese classics. Then we will consider a popularization of divination practices in the form of almanacs that circulated widely in ancient China. Students can expect to try their hands at the actual practice of the various divination techniques covered, but most class time will be used to engage important themes arising from our investigations, Readings may include:  The Ancestral Landscape: Time, Space, and Community in Late Shang China (Ca. 1200-1045 B.C.)  by David Keightley;  Oracle Bones: A Journey Through Time in China  by Peter Hessler; the  Yijing  ( Book of Changes ); selections from  The Cambridge History of Ancient China: From the Origins of Civilization to 221 B.C. ; and select scholarly articles.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1865 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Times of Trauma

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Judith Greenberg

Description

The shock of trauma can freeze a moment. Time can seem elongated or detached. But then, belatedly, a traumatic event can hauntingly return and feel present. How does trauma fracture narrative continuity and a cohesive sense of time? How can it collapse distinctions among past, present and future? This course will explore theories about the nature of time and the coherence or fragmentation of Self. It will consider how traumas are documented, narrated, and passed on individually and in art, memorials, and performance. Readings may include St. Augustine's  Confessions  (Book 11), Marcel Proust  Swann's Way , Virginia Woolf's  Between the Acts , W. B. Sebald's Austerlitz, Art Spiegelman's  Maus , Tim O'Brien's  The Things They Carried , Marguerite Duras'  The War , Patrick Modiano's  Dora Bruder , Saidiya Harman's  Lose Your Mother  and  The Melancholy of Race  by Anne Anlin Cheng.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1369 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

Japan and the Discovery of Interiority

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Nina Cornyetz

Description

The process of modernization in Western Europe spanned hundreds of years, from its nascent origins in the Renaissance, through the Enlightenment, into the twentieth century. In Japan this same process was collapsed into a few short decades around the turn of the nineteenth century. We will examine the shift from a premodern to a modern system of subjectivity and perspective in language, literature, and the performing arts. We will ask: What was the impact of Western imperialism, science, art, gender and sexual politics on Japanese language, literature and film? What were the internal conditions that made Japan ready for modernization? How did premodern conventions create a modernity in Japan different from Western models? What resisted modernization, and why? Our texts will include literature  The Miner  (Sôseki),  In Praise of Shadows  (Tanizaki), Ankoku butô dance, and secondary sources on history, language, and society, including Karatani,  Origins of Modern Japanese Literature .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9151 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

BUENOS AIRES: Myths, Icons, and Invented Traditions: A Cultural History of Latin America

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. Mitos, íconos y tradiciones inventadas is an advanced conversation course, which seeks to make students familiar with the rich and complex history of Latin America through the study of some of its most known and iconic cultural expressions. It does also work as an introductory map to the most influential and widespread approaches in Latin American social sciences, cultural studies and literary criticism. Thus, students will not only have a first encounter with key historical processes that lie behind some well know cultural icons, but also will be introduced to arguments and ways of writing that help constitute modern Latin American educated Spanish. The course will be structured in seven topics; each topic will be covered in two weeks. During these four classes, students will be exposed to different kinds of cultural materials, including literary texts, film, papers from several disciplines, theater plays, art shows and live concerts.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1440 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Sissle, Blake and the Minstrel Tradition

2 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

This course will explore the conflicting ideologies apparent in the works of Noble Sissle and James Hubert “Eubie” Blake. Famed for such hit musicals as “Shuffle Along” and “Chocolate Dandies,” Sissle and Blake formed one of the most successful musical theatre collaborations of the 1920’s. Their work draws strongly on the minstrel tradition in African American theatre, and attempts to subvert many of its conventions. It may be argued that their commercial success had the opposite effect, and served to update and modernize the very theatre conventions they sought to destroy. We will examine the effect of Sissle and Blake’s oeuvre on musical theatre in general and African American musicals in particular. Readings may include  Black Musical Theatre: From Coontown to Dreamgirls  by Allen Woll,  Black Drama  by Loften Mitchell, with excerpts from  Terrible Honesty  by Mary Douglas,  Blacks in Blackface  by Henry T. Sampson,  Reminiscing with Sissle and Blake  by Robert Kimball, and essays by W.E.B. DuBois and Alain Locke. Archival sound and film footage will be utilized along with such works as Spike Lee’s film  Bamboozled .

Notes

Course meets during the last seven weeks only, First Class: March 24; Last Class: May 5.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9356 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2017

Art’s Role in Race, Empire, and Universalism

4 units
Todd Porterfield

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE IN PARIS: This seminar begins with the conviction that the arc of modern history for both the U.S. and France has had a similar form. Both countries’s Enlightenment ideals of stunning potential, as found in  The Declaration of Independence  and  The Declaration of the Rights of Man  [sic], have often been ballyhooed and ignored, actualized and subverted. At the same time, we have remarked that the specificity of the ambivalent French entanglement with universalism, race, and empire is too rarely understood in the so-called New World. Our focus will be directed to art that in all its manifestations has had a critical role in this dynamic. It has been and continues to be deeply imbricated in the contradictory and reinforcing projects of universalism, race, and empire. But how exactly? What roles have objects played? This is the subject that the seminar will investigate. How have they functioned as symptoms, vectors, or agents in France and in dialogue with sites of French artistic and political ambitions and claims, including New France and Louisiana; the Caribbean; Egypt, North and West Africa; Tahiti and Viet Nam? And what has been their role when it comes to stateless people? Readings and discussions will consider fine art such as painting, drawing, prints, and sculpture, as well as other material objects and products of human and natural manufacture, such as books, the sea, obelisks, shells, textiles, makeup, and clothing.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9401 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

PRAGUE: Kafka and His Contexts

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. "A book must be an ax for the frozen sea in us," wrote Franz Kafka (1883-1924), one of the best known but least understood authors of our times. In this course, we will break some of the clichés which are stuck to Kafka's life and work and dive into the fascinating, intricate and profoundly humorous world of his thoughts and emotions. In Prague, the city that determined and held Kafka in its "claws", we will trace the possible sources of the writer's private obsessions which became the general characteristics of modern men: The sense of isolation, the anxiety, the self-irony, the sense of responsibility and guilt, the quest for freedom, the struggle of an individual against the system. We will read selected works of Kafka, but also Meyrink - the author of Prague ghetto - and Milan Kundera. This course aims to bring the students to a point from which they can find their own genuine and intimate understanding of Kafka's writing.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1439 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

James Reese Europe and American Music

units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

This course will examine the impact of James Reese Europe (1880-1919) on the development of American music in the early twentieth century. An innovative musician and conductor, Europe organized and conducted the first jazz concerts at Carnegie Hall (1912-1914), founded an African American music school, and served as a collaborator with Irene and Vernon Castle, who made social dancing a world-wide rage. During World War I, James Reese Europe led the all-black “Hellfighters” 15th Infantry Band, which performed throughout France and offered Europeans their first exposure to ‘le jazz hot.’ Readings may include  A Life in Ragtime: A Biography of James Reese Europe  by Reid Badger; excerpts from  The Unknown Soldiers: African-American Troops in World War I  by Arthur E. Barbeau and Florette Henri;  From Harlem to the Rhine  by Arthur W. Little;  Black Manhattan  by James Weldon Johnson; and  They All Played Ragtime  by Rudi Blesh and Harriet Janis. Sound and film recordings will also be utilized.

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, First Class: January 27; Last Class: March 10.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1639 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or EARLY
SP 2017

Witch, Heroine, Saint: Joan of Arc and Her World

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Andrew Romig

Description

In May 1431, Joan of Arc, the Maid of Orléans, was burned at the stake as a heretic and a witch by an English partisan court after the French nobility had betrayed her. An illiterate peasant girl just sixteen years of age, she had led the French back from the brink of defeat and saved the French monarchy from ruin. Yet in death, she would gain further power still as a martyr and symbol of indomitable French will and resistance. In this seminar, we will study Joan’s complex historical moment and her place within the long history of medieval women, Christian mysticism, and religious fanaticism. We will trace the stories of her appearance and military success, attempt to hear her voice in the extant transcript of her heresy trial, analyze contrasting French and English narratives about her life, and explore how she became the national heroine, patron saint, and political symbol that she is today. Texts will include Christine de Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies, Catherine of Siena’s Dialogues and Letters, Thomas of Cantimpré’s Life of Christina the Astonishing, and Shakespeare’s I Henry VI. We will also analyze and discuss modern renditions of the Joan of Arc story by such diverse artists as Mark Twain, George Bernard Shaw, Bertolt Brecht, Carl Theodor Dreyer, and Luc Besson.

Notes

Same as HIST-UA 569

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9354 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Babel

4 units
Todd Porterfield

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PARIS. How might we examine the myth of Babel to test assumptions about belonging and separateness? The construction of the Tower and its destruction by God, who then covered the earth with uncomprehending multitudes, would seem to be a story of uniformity, ambition, and then essential difference, of architecture, power, identity, language, and geographic spread. For thousands of years and from the Bible to the Early Modern to today, it seems to haunts us in architectural and imperial ambitions, in film and mass media, in high and contemporary art, in dystopian nightmares about globalization, in novels of authoritarian repression and novellas of spell-binding imaginings of freedom and connectedness. In this seminar we will analyze many of its figurations in Biblical and archaeological scholarship, literature, art and architectural history, film and visual studies, linguistics, philosophy, politics, and history. The subject leaves few alternatives but to broach the culture, politics, and philosophy of living together, and so we will explore some possible alternatives in peace and hospitality, in translation and in embracing the incompetence of language. Amongst the authors encountered, there will be Borges, Derrida, Gideon, Goethe, Huntington, Kafka, Kant, Mirzoeff, and Wordsworth.

Notes

Same as IDSEM-UG 1869. Students who have taken IDSEM-UG 1869 (Babel) will not receive credit for IDSEM-UG 9354. Course is not repeatable.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9201 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

FLORENCE: Topics in 19th Century Literature: Italy and Italians in English Literature from the Romantics to Modernism

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. Romantic, Victorian, and Modernist writers in both Britain and the United States were fascinated by Italy. The "Italy and Italians" of the title refers not only to images and characters in the works of the British and American authors we will be reading but also to their affinities with Italian literature. Recurring themes in the course will be history and its uses in literature, gender and sexuality, democracy and aristocracy, language and power, and religion as an instrument of sexual repression.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1918 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2017

Truth in Narrative: Race and Slavery in the Atlantic World 1600-1900

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Carolyn Arena

Description

This seminar investigates first-person narratives of slavery from the perspective of adventurers, novelists, former slaves, abolitionists, and slave owners from the early modern period (c1500-1900). Audiences from that period, and historians alike, have doubted some of these accounts as exaggerations. 17th-century dramas, like Aphra Behn's  Oroonoko  and John Smith's  History of Virginia , have been novelized or romanticized for commercial appeal, yet nevertheless contain undeniable truths about the experience of slavery. 18th- and 19th-century accounts from former slaves, such as Mary Prince and Olaudah Equiano, have been challenged as sensationalized by those in favor of slavery, who doubted that former slaves could become such eloquent writers, and suggested that white abolitionists had ghost-written them instead for their own political gain. This class will discuss how racism influenced these accusations, and how their central message of slavery's brutality can be confirmed, rather than rejected, using memoirs by slave-holders themselves. This course uses these sources to trace the trajectory of New World slavery from its origins in the Mediterranean, to the enslavement of both Native Americans and Africans shipped throughout the Atlantic, to the development of slavery as a racialized institution through colonial legal codes, and finally, to Abolition movements leading up to the American Civil War. The course will focus on the discussion of the aforementioned narratives plus other narratives and film adaptations like Solomon Northup's  Twelve Years a Slave , with short lectures contextualizing each work in colonial and international history.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1856 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Politics, Ethics and Aesthetics of Photography

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Sonia Werner

Description

The seminar begins with a critical history of photography, and a consideration of the technology’s advent as something of a misfit art, before focusing on its increasing use as an instrument of visual evidence. We turn then to a series of case histories, from the early use of photography as a forensic tool at 19th century crime scenes, to the counter-forensic visual reconstructions of contemporary drone strikes in Pakistan, or recent police violence against unarmed civilians of color in the US. In each instance we ask how photography shapes what becomes visible or legible as violence, and what kinds of suffering—and what modes of resistance—move different spectators affectively, ethically, and politically. The seminar will rely on key theoretical works on photography as well as more recent critical interventions that help us reckon the use of surveillance and its neoliberal logics (Cole, Farocki, Steyerl, Weizman). How might the ubiquity of cameras inure or blind us to photography’s work? The seminar seeks to help students better understand the complex linkages between perception and understanding, and how photographs, as the modern visual form par excellence, shape our sense of the political world and our place in it.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9200 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

FLORENCE: History of Italian Fashion

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. Students trace the birth, evolution, decline, revival, and most recent developments of Italian fashion from the Late Gothic Age to the present "made in Italy" design. Italian fashion styles are decoded in relation to art history in an international, social and economic context. Fashion and its connections with culture, subculture, gender and communication are emphasized. On-site visits also illustrate the dominating role of Florence in fashion from its origin until now. Conducted in English.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1457 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2017

The Odyssey: Estrangement and Homecoming

2 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Laura Slatkin

Description

One of the two foundational epics of so-called Western Culture, the  Odyssey  features a wily hero whose journeys are extraordinary and whose longing for home is unbounded. The  Odyssey  offers a complex meditation on brotherhood, bestiality, sexuality, kinship, and power; it is the great epic of cross-cultural encounter, in all its seductive and violent aspects, as well as the great poem of marriage. An adventure in nostos (homecoming), the  Odyssey  shows us the pleasures and dangers of voyaging among strangers. Constantly exploring the boundaries between the civilized and the savage, the poem offers as well a political critique of many ancient institutions, not least the family, patriarchy, hospitality customs, and the band-of-brothers so central to epic ideology. And as a masterwork of narrative art, the  Odyssey  asks us to consider the relation of fiction to “truth.” We will explore these and other matters in the  Odyssey , and may make some concluding forays into contemporary re-workings of Odyssean themes and characters.

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, First Class: January 25; Last Class: March 8.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1700 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2017

Becoming "Global" in the Early Modern World

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Valerie Forman

Description

Over and over, we are told that the world we live in is becoming increasingly global, that all its parts are connected to one another; and goods, people, culture, and information can move from one place to another, seemingly without barriers. Yet how true are these claims? And how new are the phenomena these claims describe? Scholars have pointed to the middle of the sixteenth century as the moment when the economy became global, and the age of exploration and colonization began to connect many parts of the world to each other in a complex network that included and radically reimagined forms of cooperation, piracy, and slavery. This course will explore what kinds of global consciousness developed in the early modern period in negotiations with these transformations. Some of our central questions include: to what extent did early modern people begin to imagine and experience the world globally, that is, as an entity whose regions were interdependent? Which groups of people began to experience it globally? How were things, places, and persons, not seen before categorized or valued? What influence did global encounters have on ideas about gender, sexuality, class, religion, and citizenship and on social and economic practices? What new kinds of narratives about the world developed in relation to the challenges of participating in it? Finally, to what extent is globalization a “western” phenomenon or a sign of modernity? We will investigate a wide variety of primary works, including travel narratives, plays, poems, ethnography, film, engravings, and globes. We will also read secondary works by literary scholars, anthropologists, and historians of labor, the economy, and science. Many of these works also put the past and present in conversation with each other in compelling ways. While many of the primary works originate in “Europe” or the Americas, we will also study a range of works that challenge the Eurocentric view of globalization that was emerging and still dominates much of contemporary discourse of globalization.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 721 006.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1603 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Modern Poetry and the Actual World

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Lisa Goldfarb

Description

Although lyric poetry is the art of language that we reserve for the expression of the emotional dimension of our human experience, lyric poets also importantly use the forms and conventions of their art to respond to the shape and substance of the world they inhabit; that is, the historical, political, and physical aspects of the world—the “actual world”—in which they live. This course has two principal aims: first, to help us to develop skills in the reading of lyric poetry, and, second, to consider the complex relation between lyric poetry and the actual world. In the first half of the class, we will study the forms and conventions of lyric poetry and work on developing our poetic sensibilities. In the second half, we will focus our attention on the relationship of modern poets to the concrete or actual world and focus our study on W.H. Auden and Wallace Stevens, two poets who address the pressing questions of their day, and the world they shared, in strikingly different ways. Yet, however different their approaches, both poets ponder questions of faith and secularity, consider heroism and loss in a century marked by war, and probe our human relationship to nature in answer to an increasingly industrialized and technological world. Readings will include texts that consider how to read lyric poetry (Hirsch, Vendler, Perloff), a representative selection of modern lyric poetry (Eliot, Pound, Valéry, Éluard, Apollinaire, Moore, H.D., Bishop, Hughes, Brooks, Rich), the works of Auden and Stevens (essays and poems), as well as the philosophical, historical and political narratives to which they refer and that inform their work (Freud, Nietzsche, William James, Santayana).

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9550 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
SP 2017

TEL AVIV: Ancient Israel History and Archaeology: Travelers, Collectors, and Antiquities Robbers

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-TEL AVIV. The story of the archaeological discipline in the Land of Israel is strongly tied with the major developments that the region has undergone in the last two centuries. This course offers an overview of the history of archaeology in Palestine since the appearance of the first European travelers and missionaries in the mid-19th century, along the vibrant interest of collectors, forgers and robbers in the Promised Land, through the appearance of the first scientific excavations, the rise of the American biblical archaeology and its influence on local Israeli research. Special attention will be given to the way the newly born Israeli archaeology helped to establish the Zionist identity that wished to pass over two thousand years of Diaspora history; the methods by which the nascent Israeli archaeology connected new-comers to the land of the patriarchs and the manner by which Israeli scholars served state interests in the creation of the national Zionist ethos. The aftermath of the Six Days War and the increasing tension between the Bible and archaeology will be discussed in light of the intense debate over the historicity of the Exodus story, Joshua's conquests and the United Kingdom of David and Solomon. Finally, at the turn of the millennium, post-modern archaeology presented a new pluralistic view of the past. This multi-vocal framework will be used as a background for discussing the archaeology of otherness and minorities in 21st century Israel.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1826 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

(Dis)Placed Urban Histories

4 units Fri
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Rebecca Amato

Description

Neighborhood change comes in many varieties. Mid-twentieth century urban renewal in U.S. cities brought bulldozers and tower-in-the-park housing developments to dozens of poor neighborhoods considered ripe for revision. Early-twenty-first century gentrification, meanwhile, has brought high-end commerce and affluence to areas once occupied by low-income and working class communities. In the Melrose section of the South Bronx, a series of changes have influenced the streetscapes and lives of residents. Rampant arson in the 1970s and 1980s destroyed acres of the neighborhood, for example, while migrants from Puerto Rico and immigrants from the Dominican Republic, West Africa, and Bangladesh, among others, settled in the remaining homes of Melrose to build new lives in a new city. Most recently, federal dollars have been earmarked for Melrose’s reconstruction and redevelopment. This course, offered in partnership with the Bronx-based community empowerment organization WHEDCo, invites students to become activist historians whose objective is to learn what histories are at risk of being silenced or displaced as the South Bronx changes. Students will conduct archival and secondary research; produce collaborative oral histories with neighborhood residents and business owners; and meet with activists who are working to protect the interests of the current community of Melrose. The course will culminate in an on-line archive and a physical, history-based exhibit to be co-produced with neighborhood residents and displayed in a publicly accessible, outdoor park. Readings may include Jonathan Mahler’s  Ladies and Gentlemen the Bronx is Burning  and Jill Jonnes’s  South Bronx Rising .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9403 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

PRAGUE: Central European Film

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. This interdisciplinary seminar is designed to discuss and question the identity of specific nations in European space, which has always been a fascinating crossroad of ideas and ideologies as well as the birthplace of wars and totalitarian systems. The course will cover masterpieces of Russian, Hungarian, German, Polish and Czech cinematography, focusing on several crucial periods of history, in particular WWII and its aftermath, showing moral dilemmas of individuals and nations under the Nazi regime as well as revealing the bitter truth of the Stalinist years.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1823 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

In with the Old, Out with the New: Debates on "Tradition" in Western Music

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Kwami Coleman

Description

Contests between stalwart custodians of “tradition” and rebels searching for new, untested modes of expression pervade Western music history. This course surveys some of the most contentious debates on music’s past, present, and future waged between music theorists, critics, artists, and audiences, spanning the last five hundred years. Our focus is on the seemingly inevitable tension between what music is, what it should be, and what it can be. Starting with the Greek philosophers of antiquity, we explore debates on the music of Claudio Monteverdi, Ludwig van Beethoven, Richard Wagner, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, John Cage, Bob Dylan, and The Slits. We also examine the backlash against and subsequent defense of styles like jazz, rock and roll, punk rock, and rap. Our goal is to better understand how culture is “made” ​precisely ​during ​these ​moments of charged debate, where a particular music’s perceived merits​ or transgressions serve as the pretext for larger ​often controversial ideological issues. Art, in this sense, becomes a platform by which to observe how competing aesthetic value​ systems​ reveal deep social and cultural rifts. This class meets twice a week. Our first session is devoted to scrutinizing and discussing primary sources​:​ letters, newspaper and magazine articles, journal entries, sound recordings, and film. For our second session we read and discuss secondary sources by scholars, critics, and investigative journalists for context, using this new information as a way to think critically about the primary sources and our own aesthetic judgments. Debating music tradition and innovation, as we shall see, is a long-standing tradition in its own right.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1772 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2017

Music and Civic Culture: Ancient and Modern

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Bruce King

Description

This course examines the role of music theory and musical performance in the formation of community, actual and utopic. We will begin our study with the musical, mathematical, and mystical thought of Pythagoras and his followers in the short-lived utopian community of Croton: How is “the Music of the Spheres” a paradigm both for ethical action within the community and for the progress of the soul within the cosmos? From Croton, we will turn to debates about music and civic culture in fifth-century democratic Athens: What forms of music and poetry sustain and subvert citizens and states? Is there a particularly “democratic” form of music? (Readings from Aeschylus, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plato, and Aristotle.) From ancient Greece, we will then turn to the late-nineteenth century efforts of Wagner, partially inspired by Athenian tragedy, to create the “Total Work of Art” in his Ring cycle of music-dramas and in the festival at Bayreuth; we will also read Nietzsche’'s (and Adorno’'s) responses to Greek tragedy and to Wagner. Finally, we will consider some twentieth-century experiments in music and art, especially those associated with Fluxus and with New York City (e.g., John Cage, Steve Reich, La Monte Young, Yoko Ono, The Velvet Underground), in dialogue with our earlier readings.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9150 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

BUENOS AIRES: Tango and Mass Culture (in Spanish)

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. This course explores Tango as an aesthetic, social and cultural formation that is articulated in interesting and complex ways with the traditions of culture and politics in Argentina and Latin America more generally. During the rapid modernization of the 1920s and 1930s, Tango (like Brazilian Samba), which had been seen as a primitive and exotic dance, began to emerge as a kind of modern primative art form that quickly came to occupy a central space in nationalist discourse. The course explores the way that perceptions of a primative and a modern converge in this unique and exciting art. In addition, the course will consider tango as a global metaphor with deeply embedded connections to urban poverty, social marginalization, and masculine authority.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1793 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Femininity, Postfeminism and Mass Media

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Moya Luckett

Description

Postfeminism is an ambiguous and often contradictory term whose very indeterminacy speaks to the difficulties in understanding contemporary relationships between feminism, femininity, citizenship and identity. Positioned simultaneously as a backlash against feminism, a testament to achieved gender equality, as a reclamation of traditional feminine values and a sign of female success, postfeminism’s significance is widely felt even as its specific meanings and cultural effects appear unclear. This class will examine postfeminism’s relationship to feminism and femininity, situating all three as historically and culturally significant manifestations of the female self. Closely linked to the development of neoliberalism with its emphasis on self-reliance, choice and privatization, postfeminism is largely a product of consumer culture and mass media that have particularly consequences for feminine identities and gender relations. This course will look at popular women’s media from the makeover show, to fashion magazines and blogs, chick films and television drama to explore how they manage tradition and promote a more privatized and commercial feminine self, negotiating the relationship between family responsibilities and more laissez faire ideas of female success and self-actualization.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1905 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Designing for New Climates: Histories of Adaptation

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Peder Anker, Mitchell Joachim

Description

The course explores how designers have responded to environmental problems and climate change. It starts with turn of the century admirations for primitivism and ends with the cyber punks design­ing new environments online. Following the work of architects, artists, urban planners, graphic designers and fashionista, the course will review the historical evolution of attempts to “save the world” from our environmental crisis. Who were the key figures that first ignited the green design revolution and its ensuing agenda? The class will unpack texts by thinkers such as Patrick Geddes, Henry David Thoreau, Ebenezer Howard, Louis Sullivan, Buckminster Fuller, Jane Goodall, Annie Leonard, Paul Hawken, Amory Lovins, Walter Gropius, Herbert Beyer, Ian McHarg, and many more. The class will focus on various modernist design schemes for adapting to new warmer climates, and why these attempts often failed. We will also devote time to discuss topics such as building closed ecological systems, counterculture designs, cyber environments, sick building syndrome, biomimetics, eco-fashion, earth art, and other attempts to design with nature. The overall objective is twofold; to survey the larger historical context of ecological design and define specific contributions to the climate change debate. The students will be asked to design, develop and participate in a street project.

Notes

Section 002 for Environmental Studies Majors

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1866 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

Poetry and the Politics of Decolonization

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Linn Cary Mehta

Description

The course looks at poets writing in the twentieth century and after whose work is concerned with liberation from colonial rule and, subsequently, with the formation of a post-colonial literary voice. Poetry in the period of decolonization deals with issues of national, racial, and gender identity, place and displacement, and freedom from linguistic and political oppression. We will read, among others, two leading poets of négritude, Aimé Césaire and Léopold Senghor, in relation to movements in Caribbean, African, and American literature including the Harlem Renaissance (Nicolas Guillén, Derek Walcott, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes); poets from the Indian Subcontinent and Middle East such as Tagore, Iqbal, Faiz and Darwish; Latin American poets including Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, and Octavio Paz; and English-language poets including W.B. Yeats, William Carlos Williams, and more contemporary movements in poetry. Using theory and historical background, we will look at the work of each poet comparatively in the context of international development and political change. The course offers an approach to globalization through literature; since this process has touched so much of the world, we are open to works from other literatures that students propose.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9400 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

PRAGUE: Modern Dissent in Central Europe: The Art of Defeat

4 units

500

Cannot serve request to /content/gallatin/en/academics/courses.html on this server


ApacheSling/2.2 (Day-Servlet-Engine/4.1.52, Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM 1.7.0_79, Linux 2.6.32-642.6.2.el6.centos.plus.x86_64 amd64)