Skip Navigation

Courses

Filter By

Courses

Found 367 courses
INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/tutorial-proposal.html Description: Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include "Writing Long Fiction," "Dante's Literary and Historical Background," and "Environmental Design." Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Tutorial Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: December 1. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/private-lesson-proposal.html Description: Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Private Lesson Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: January 27. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2028 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Proseminar: The Past in the Present: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Eugene Vydrin

Description

The past is… An enabling tradition? A stifling burden? A repetition compulsion? A revolutionary imperative? Each of these by turns or all at once, the idea of the past figures centrally in the work of thinkers across disciplines and mediums: philosophers and psychologists, historians and social theorists, poets, painters, and filmmakers. This proseminar, aimed at the needs and interests of students embarking upon the Gallatin MA, offers an introduction to a series of influential theories and methods in the humanities and social sciences by exploring and comparing their conceptions of the past and its effects on the present and the future. The past is an unquiet ghost haunting theoretical texts as well as the literary and visual artworks they illuminate and that have inspired them. With the presence of the past as our guiding thread, we will read and closely analyze classic and modern texts (in fields ranging from philosophy and cultural theory to literature, painting, and film, to anthropology, sociology, and historiography); map major theoretical and political positions within these texts and artworks; develop a shared critical vocabulary; and formulate the urgent and intractable questions that motivate these texts and provoke our responses to them. Our texts may include essays and books by Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Woolf, Stein, Du Bois, Benjamin, Césaire, Foucault, Said, Gilroy, and Morrison. Students will play a major role in navigating our readings, steering our discussions, and choosing the topics we address. In addition to writing short responses and a midterm paper, students will conduct a critical research project on a relevant topic of their own choosing that will culminate in a 15-20 page final paper.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335, or Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403, are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2510 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Critic vs. Cliché

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Ben Ratliff

Syllabus

Description

“Cliches invite you not to think,” wrote the literary critic Christopher Ricks, “but you may always decline the invitation.” Cliches can be bad for language, thought, and action, in that they serve efficiency and an abstract idea of power, and lead the user away from the truth. But we all use them, and to avoid them entirely may be impossible. Which makes the work of the cultural critic, part of whose job is to locate and question them wherever they occur, that much trickier and deeper. In this advanced writing seminar, we will move toward a sophisticated relationship with the cliche. What is the difference between cliche and idiom, meme, hype, tradition, archetype? Where do they live and breed? What do they accomplish? If, as Adam Phillips says, “cliches are there to stop us being suspicious,” can they be much more than a writer’s bad habit--can they be used for bullying and societal oppression? We will read criticism which notices the use of cliches (or received wisdom) in culture, by Gerald Early, Hannah Arendt, Margo Jefferson, and others, as well as some fiction (Paul Beatty’s novel The Sellout) and satire; and writings on the subject of the cliche itself by critics, linguists, sociologists and others (Christopher Ricks, Orin Hargraves, George Orwell). Students will write critical essays in response to the readings, as well as to current cultural or social events, paying special attention to how cliches function in the subject itself and the discourse around it.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (bpr212@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2675 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Vibrant Matters

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Eugenia Kisin

Description

How does matter—generally thought of as the inert stuff of nature, acted upon or animated by humans—come to  matter  in the social, political, and ecological senses of the word? This seminar explores recent approaches to materiality across art, anthropology, feminist theory, and political ecology, an interdisciplinary constellation of scholarship often called the “new materialism.” Proceeding from political theorist Jane Bennett’s rendering of vibrancy as a thingly agency bound up with social justice, this course is an invitation to work critically with this formation in a transcultural way. We will interrogate the “newness” of the new materialism, situating its histories and genealogies in earlier phenomenological approaches to matter, while exploring its alternative lineages and contestations. Students will apply the new materialism’s diverse methodological tools for theorizing things and networks to their own practices and projects. Emphasizing graduate-level reading skills, our discussions will be based primarily on several recent book-length texts, which we will work to situate within the new materialism and within their authors’ own disciplinary lineages. In addition to Bennett’s  Vibrant Matter , these texts may include Bill Brown’s  Other Things,  Natasha Myers’  Rendering Life Molecular , Spyros Papapetros’s  On the Animation of the Inorganic , and Anna Tsing’s  The Mushroom at the End of the World .

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (eugenia.kisin@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Independent Study

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/independentstudy.html Description: In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean's Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student's work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Independent Study Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: January 27. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

ELEC-GG2544 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Fiction Inside Out

4 units Fri
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Meera Nair

Syllabus

Description

In this fiction workshop, we will identify and practice the essential technical elements of fiction writing. We will look under the hood, take the back off the clock, peer into the innards, in order to study the formal decisions necessary for effective story-telling. Our inquiry will include point of entry; character and plot; creating meaningful scenes; interiority v/s external action; exposition; the management of time; the position of the narrator; linear v/s modular design; dialogue and its uses; conflict and resolution; image systems and so on. Fun exercises that encourage play, class readings, technique essays and student work will be points of departure for our enquiries into the internal workings of fiction. Readings include among others Sharma, Marcus, Gurganus, Bulawayo, Anam, and essays on the craft of writing by Butler, Hrijbal and Keesey among others.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (meerav3@gmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2665 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Film as Postcolonial Visual Culture

4 units
Jamie Berthe

Description

Relations of looking were a constitutive part of the power dynamic that defined the colonial project, and they continue to shape (and re-shape) the postcolonial landscape in very important ways. This course brings together key texts in postcolonial studies and visual culture, while putting these readings in conversation with French and Francophone film. Among other things, the course will address the imbrications of post/colonial histories, practices of representation, and visual economies; it will use theoretical, historical, and cinematic texts to examine concepts like in/visibility, cultural imperialism, and post/colonial identity. Students will be encouraged to think about how cinematic images can be seen to intersect with, challenge, codify, and/or interrupt political and post/colonial ideologies. Authors will include Aimé Césaire, Franz Fanon, and Edward Said, to name a few. Filmmakers will include Gillo Pontecorvo, Jean Rouch, Ousmane Sembène, and Jean-Marie Teno, among others. Students will be assigned weekly readings, response papers, and a final research paper. It is further expected that students will watch films (every week) outside of class.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (jamieberthe@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2402 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Master's Thesis I

2 units
5:30 PM - 6:15 PM

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis1.html DESCRIPTION: In the first months of Master’s Thesis I, the student works under the supervision of a grading instructor (generally, the student’s adviser) but also quite independently and with great focus on the thesis research, project, or artistic work described in the proposals they wrote in the Thesis Proposal Seminar. By the end of the semester, the student will have begun drafting the thesis paper (or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the research essay, artistic aims essay, and other required written supplements to the thesis artwork). Throughout the semester, the student and adviser (the grading instructor for this class) should meet at least four times to discuss ideas and drafts. All students are required to attend a mandatory information session during the first week of classes. To pass this class, students must demonstrate significant progress toward completing the thesis. For more details, please see the additional information about Master’s Thesis I on the Gallatin website.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2401. Please note there are two components to this course: an independent study section with hours to be arranged between the student and faculty adviser and a mandatory information session during the first week of the semester. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis I Registration form, available on the Gallatin website. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the student a permission number to register for the independent study section. When students register for the independent study section, they will be automatically enrolled in section one (CORE-GG 2402 001). The mandatory information session day/time is Tuesday, January 24, 2017, 5:30-6:15pm in 1 Washington Place, Room 801.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2717 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Islam and Modernity: Re-thinking Tradition, Cosmopolitanism and Democracy

4 units Tue
4:55 PM - 7:35 PM
Ali Mirsepassi

Description

This graduate seminar will focus upon the broad question of how societies, predominantly influenced by Islamic traditions, might find a home in the modern world on their own terms. We will discuss the possibility of a critical re-thinking of certain modern conventional modes of thinking about modernity, secularism, and democracy. The class will examine notions of citizenship, religion, and globalization in societies that have been historically influenced by Islamic tradition and institutions. This will be done by way of interrogating the works of contemporary scholars of Islamic modernity, including Mohammed Arkoun, Abdullahi An-Na'im, Fatima Mernissi, Talal Asad, Saba Mahmood, and Aziz Al-Azmeh. We will explore questions that cut across the disciplines of history, anthropology, sociology, and law.

Notes

Same as MEIS-GA 1807. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (am128@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units
Section 002
Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Rosalind Fredericks

Syllabus

Description

Students in this class will draft and complete the thesis proposal. They will learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate goals that are ambitious but also achievable in a reasonable amount of time and in accordance with the availability of resources. Multiple sections of this course will be offered for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. Please note: unlike other requirements in the thesis and defense sequence of classes, the Thesis Proposal Seminar is offered only once a year in the spring semester. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit a final draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser. The instructor’s acceptance of the draft will count as official Gallatin approval but students must also submit their proposal using the appropriate form, which will then be emailed to the adviser and Seminar instructor for confirmation.

Notes

Prerequisite CORE-GG 2018, CORE-GG 2025, CORE-GG 2028 or CORE-GG 2029, or permission of the MA Program Director, Karen Hornick (karen.hornick@nyu.edu). Section 2 is for students who intend to complete a thesis drawing largely from research in the fields of the social sciences. Pass/fail only. This 2-unit course is taken during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. This course is only offered in the Spring semester. Students may not take this class in their first semester and are strongly advised to take it after they have completed the Proseminar requirement. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 24th, in which all sections meet at Silver Center, Room 414.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units
Section 003
Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Bella Mirabella

Syllabus

Description

Students in this class will draft and complete the thesis proposal. They will learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate goals that are ambitious but also achievable in a reasonable amount of time and in accordance with the availability of resources. Multiple sections of this course will be offered for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. Please note: unlike other requirements in the thesis and defense sequence of classes, the Thesis Proposal Seminar is offered only once a year in the spring semester. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit a final draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser. The instructor’s acceptance of the draft will count as official Gallatin approval but students must also submit their proposal using the appropriate form, which will then be emailed to the adviser and Seminar instructor for confirmation.

Notes

Prerequisite CORE-GG 2018, CORE-GG 2025, CORE-GG 2028 or CORE-GG 2029, or permission of the MA Program Director, Karen Hornick (karen.hornick@nyu.edu). Section 3 is for students who intend to complete an artistic thesis. Pass/fail only. This 2-unit course is taken during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. This course is only offered in the Spring semester. Students may not take this class in their first semester and are strongly advised to take it after they have completed the Proseminar requirement. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 24th, in which all sections meet at Silver Center, Room 414.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Sara Murphy

Syllabus

Description

Students in this class will draft and complete the thesis proposal. They will learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate goals that are ambitious but also achievable in a reasonable amount of time and in accordance with the availability of resources. Multiple sections of this course will be offered for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. Please note: unlike other requirements in the thesis and defense sequence of classes, the Thesis Proposal Seminar is offered only once a year in the spring semester. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit a final draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser. The instructor’s acceptance of the draft will count as official Gallatin approval but students must also submit their proposal using the appropriate form, which will then be emailed to the adviser and Seminar instructor for confirmation.

Notes

Prerequisite CORE-GG 2018, CORE-GG 2025, CORE-GG 2028 or CORE-GG 2029, or permission of the MA Program Director, Karen Hornick (karen.hornick@nyu.edu). Section 1 is for students who intend to complete a thesis drawing largely from research in the fields of the humanities. Pass/fail only. This 2-unit course is taken during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. This course is only offered in the Spring semester. Students may not take this class in their first semester and are strongly advised to take it after they have completed the Proseminar requirement. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 24th, in which all sections meet at Silver Center, Room 414.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Internship

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/internship-proposal.html Description: Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between their academic interests and related industries, and between academic theory and practical experience. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own internships as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship placement site, students are expected to attend two workshops; submit journal reflections about their internship experiences; write a mid-semester progress report describing the status of the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Internship Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: January 27. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students registering for an Internship for the first time are required to attend two workshops: Workshop I: Thursday, February 2, 12:30-1:30pm or Thursday, February 9, 12:30-1:30pm; Workshop II: Thursday, March 23, 12:30-1:30pm or Thursday, March 30, 12:30-1:30pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2403 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Master's Thesis II

2 units
5:30 PM - 6:15 PM

Description

Application: [http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis2.html Description: To pass this class, the student must submit and defend his or her thesis. In the first months of the semester, the student continues to work in collaboration with the adviser to complete the thesis paper or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the artwork as well as the related research essay and other required accompanying materials. All students are required to attend a a mandatory information session during the first week of classes. As prescribed by the online Thesis and Defense calendar, students must receive approval for all work from their adviser far enough in advance of the defense so that the other panelists will have at least four weeks to read and inspect the submission. For more details, please see the additional information about Master's Thesis II on the Gallatin website as well as the thesis and defense calendar and submission forms.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2402. Please note there are two components to this course: an independent study section with hours to be arranged between the student and faculty adviser and a mandatory information session meeting during the first week of the semester. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis II Registration form, available on the Gallatin website. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the student a permission number to register for the independent study section. When students register for the independent study section, they will be automatically enrolled in section one (CORE-GG 2403 001). The mandatory information session day/time is Wednesday, January 25, 2017, 5:30-6:15pm in 1 Washington Place, Room 801.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2644 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

From Raw Footage to Finished Film

4 units Mon
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Cheryl Furjanic

Description

This course is open to all filmmakers (fiction or non-fiction, experimental or otherwise) at all levels (beginner or advanced), but the expectation is that students will have shot a significant amount of footage prior to the course's start date and will complete a short film by the end of the course. In a collaborative workshop environment, students will work through aspects of the post-production process from screening raw footage and preparing footage for the edit, through editing and cinematic-problem-solving, to completing a short film. In addition to addressing practical concerns (editing, style, story structure, etc.), we will discuss related issues such as the importance of knowing how to situate your film within certain historical and representational paradigms. Who is the audience for your film? Where is the best “home” for your completed film? Projects may be extensions of research projects, fiction films, non-fiction films, animation, etc. Students will be required to read extensively about film history and technique, complete weekly editing/production assignments, and attend screenings outside of class hours. Over the course of the semester, every film will be given a lot of individualized attention so students are expected to engage with the variety of projects being undertaken by their peers and to participate actively in class workshops and discussions. Classes will sometimes include guest lectures by filmmakers. Students may edit on whichever platform is most comfortable and/or accessible.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (cheryl.furjanic@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2601 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Arts of Intervention: Social Practices in Public Spaces

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Mark Read

Syllabus

Description

The contemporary art world is replete with artists that perform or install works in public spaces as a method of provoking critical dialogue about the social, political, and economic conditions that shape modern life. In this course, you will engage with the emerging field of social practice: socially oriented research and practice by artists that includes but is not limited to urban interventions, utopian proposals, guerrilla architecture, “new genre” public art, social sculpture, project-based community practice, interactive media, service dispersals, street performance, and social media. This course examines how the idea of public space has evolved over time, up to and including considerations of virtual public space. In this course we will consider artists as members of society who intervene in and create structures of participation, frequently with the intention of changing the actual, economic and political conditions that construct social reality. We will research and produce projects about complex social sites of power like The Classroom, The Library, The Newspaper, The Walk, The Lecture, The Potluck, The Road Trip, The Party, The Salon, and The Community Center. Students will examine and discuss the work of contemporary artists such as The Guerilla Girls, Krysztof Wodiczco, The Yes Men, Martha Rosler, Rick Lowe and Suzanne Lazy. We will read and discuss the work of authors such as Lucy Lippard, Shannon Jackson, Clare Bishop, Henri Lefebvre, Guy Debord, Pablo Helguera, Nato Thompson, Greg Sholette and Grant Kester.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (mr105@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2017

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship, students are expected to attend two workshops about internships; keep a journal of their daily internship experiences; submit a progress report describing the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Internship Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: Monday, May 22. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2017

Internship

4 units
Section 002

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship, students are expected to attend two workshops about internships; keep a journal of their daily internship experiences; submit a progress report describing the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Internship Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: Monday, July 3. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2017

Thesis Advisement

1 units
Section 002

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semesterin which they registered for Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403 (or Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335), are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2017

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they registered for Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403 (or Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335), are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2017

Private Lesson

4 units
Section 002

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Private Lesson Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: Monday, July 3. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2017

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Private Lesson Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: Monday, May 22. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2403 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2017

Master's Thesis II

2 units

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis2.html Description: To pass this class, the student must submit and defend his or her thesis. In the first months of the semester, the student continues to work in collaboration with the adviser to complete the thesis paper or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the artwork as well as the related research essay and other required accompanying materials. All students are required to attend a number of writing workshops to aid this process. As prescribed by the online Thesis and Defense calendar, students must receive approval for all work from their adviser far enough in advance of the defense so that the other panelists will have at least four weeks to read and inspect the submission. For more details, please see the additional information about Master's Thesis II on the Gallatin website as well as the thesis and defense calendar and submission forms.

Notes

Session I: May 22 - July 2. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2402. Students who register for Master's Thesis I in the summer should contact a program adviser (Karen Hornick or Jamie Berthe) to discuss requirements and deadlines. Before enrolling in this course, students should confirm their adviser is available during the summer months to supervise work on the thesis. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis II Registration form. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the student a permission number.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2017

Independent Study

4 units
Section 002

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student’s work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Independent Study Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: Monday, July 3. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2017

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student’s work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Independent Study Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: Monday, May 22. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2402 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2017

Master's Thesis I

2 units

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis1.html DESCRIPTION: In the first months of Master’s Thesis I, the student works under the supervision of a grading instructor (generally, the student’s adviser) but also quite independently and with great focus on the thesis research, project, or artistic work described in the proposals they wrote in the Thesis Proposal Seminar. By the end of the semester, the student will have begun drafting the thesis paper (or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the research essay, artistic aims essay, and other required written supplements to the thesis artwork). Throughout the semester, the student and adviser (the grading instructor for this class) should meet at least four times to discuss ideas and drafts. All students are required to attend a series of four drafting and writing workshops To pass this class, students must demonstrate significant progress toward completing the thesis. For more details, please see the additional information about Master’s Thesis I on the Gallatin website.

Notes

Session I: May 22 - July 2. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2401. Students who register for Master's Thesis I in the summer should contact a program adviser (Karen Hornick or Jamie Berthe) to discuss requirements and deadlines. Before enrolling in this course, students should confirm their adviser is available during the summer months to supervise work on the thesis. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis I Registration form. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the student a permission number.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2017

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include “Creating a Magazine,” “Dante’s Literary and Historical Background,” and “Environmental Design.” Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Tutorial Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: Monday, July 3. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2017

Tutorial

4 units
Section 002

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include “Creating a Magazine,” “Dante’s Literary and Historical Background,” and “Environmental Design.” Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Tutorial Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: Monday, July 3. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they registered for Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403 (or Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335), are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Thesis Advisement

1 units
Section 002

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semesterin which they registered for Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403 (or Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335), are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship, students are expected to attend two workshops about internships; keep a journal of their daily internship experiences; submit a progress report describing the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, May 23. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu)

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Internship

4 units
Section 002

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship, students are expected to attend two workshops about internships; keep a journal of their daily internship experiences; submit a progress report describing the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Tuesday, July 5. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu)

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2402 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Master's Thesis I

2 units

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis1.html DESCRIPTION: In the first months of Master’s Thesis I, the student works under the supervision of a grading instructor (generally, the student’s adviser) but also quite independently and with great focus on the thesis research, project, or artistic work described in the proposals they wrote in the Thesis Proposal Seminar. By the end of the semester, the student will have begun drafting the thesis paper (or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the research essay, artistic aims essay, and other required written supplements to the thesis artwork). Throughout the semester, the student and adviser (the grading instructor for this class) should meet at least four times to discuss ideas and drafts. All students are required to attend a series of four drafting and writing workshops To pass this class, students must demonstrate significant progress toward completing the thesis. For more details, please see the additional information about Master’s Thesis I on the Gallatin website.

Notes

Session I: May 23 - July 3. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2401. Before enrolling in this course, students should confirm their adviser is available during the summer months to supervise work on the thesis. In addition, students are expected to meet with support staff (these meetings will be arranged as the session starts). To register, submit the Master’s Thesis I Registration form, available on the Gallatin website.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Private Lesson

4 units
Section 002

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Tuesday, July 5. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu)

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, May 23. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu)

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2403 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Master's Thesis II

2 units

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis2.html Description: To pass this class, the student must submit and defend his or her thesis. In the first months of the semester, the student continues to work in collaboration with the adviser to complete the thesis paper or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the artwork as well as the related research essay and other required accompanying materials. All students are required to attend a number of writing workshops to aid this process. As prescribed by the online Thesis and Defense calendar, students must receive approval for all work from their adviser far enough in advance of the defense so that the other panelists will have at least four weeks to read and inspect the submission. For more details, please see the additional information about Master's Thesis II on the Gallatin website as well as the thesis and defense calendar and submission forms.

Notes

Session I: May 23 - July 3. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2402. Before enrolling in this course, students should confirm their adviser is available during the summer months to supervise work on the thesis. In addition, students are expected to meet with support staff (these meetings will be arranged as the session starts). To register, submit the Master’s Thesis II Registration form, available on the Gallatin website.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include “Creating a Magazine,” “Dante’s Literary and Historical Background,” and “Environmental Design.” Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, April 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Tutorial

4 units
Section 002

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include “Creating a Magazine,” “Dante’s Literary and Historical Background,” and “Environmental Design.” Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, April 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student’s work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, May 23. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Independent Study

4 units
Section 002

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student’s work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Tuesday, July 5. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2018 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Proseminar: Interdisciplinary Critical Theory in Practice

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Karen Hornick

Syllabus

Description

Historical and technological developments have changed ideas about cultural consumption. Is the mass audience itself a product of the goods and entertainment it consumes (as midcentury ideology theorists believed) or is it an outmoded concept lost in the wake of globalization, the sharp focusing techniques of digital marketing, crowd sourcing, and participatory culture? What are the implications of these developments for aesthetic appreciation, the formation of pleasure and desire, the relationship between culture and politics? Where do you stand as a critic, scholar, or artist in relation to such questions? This proseminar attempts to reach students with interests, practical or theoretical, in one or more of the following fields: media studies, literary and art criticism, history, sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, and philosophy (particularly aesthetics). Among the topics to be discussed are: the history of asserted differences between high and low art; the mass reproduction and commodification of art; critical judgement and the differences between fans and experts. Class readings will include a mix of major theoretical writings, histories, and a variety of primary materials including literary texts, films, and performances. Authors may include Charles Baudelaire, Willa Cather, Walter Benjamin, Dwight Macdonald, Linda Williams, Henry Jenkins, and Carl Wilson.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

SCHOL-GG2600 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Global Fellowship in Human Rights

0 units Tue
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Description


Type

Scholarly Communities (SCHOL-GG)

ELEC-GG2850 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

History of Science, Medicine and Technology

4 units Wed
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Myles Jackson

Syllabus

Description

The primary objective of the course is to provide students with a working knowledge of the historiography of the history of science, medicine, and technology. The course is organized around some of the major themes and readings in the field. Since complete coverage would be impossible, the course strives to provide a mix of classic texts and more recent scholarship in an effort to familiarize students with the methods, objectives, and research techniques employed by historians of science, medicine, and technology. While all students are welcome to take this course, this graduate seminar will prepare those interested in preparing for an exam in the field. Note that while it is always good to read the entire book, I have listed the chapters upon which we shall focus our discussion.

Notes

Same as HIST-GA 1625 HIST-GA 1625.

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2402 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Master's Thesis I

2 units Tue
5:30 PM - 6:15 PM

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis1.html DESCRIPTION: In the first months of Master’s Thesis I, the student works under the supervision of a grading instructor (generally, the student’s adviser) but also quite independently and with great focus on the thesis research, project, or artistic work described in the proposals they wrote in the Thesis Proposal Seminar. By the end of the semester, the student will have begun drafting the thesis paper (or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the research essay, artistic aims essay, and other required written supplements to the thesis artwork). Throughout the semester, the student and adviser (the grading instructor for this class) should meet at least four times to discuss ideas and drafts. All students are required to attend a mandatory information session during the first week of classes. To pass this class, students must demonstrate significant progress toward completing the thesis. For more details, please see the additional information about Master’s Thesis I on the Gallatin website.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2401. Please note there are two components to this course: an independent study section with hours to be arranged between the student and faculty adviser and a mandatory information session during the first week of the semester. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis I Registration form, available on the Gallatin website. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the student a permission number to register for the independent study section. When students register for the independent study section, they will be automatically enrolled in section one (CORE-GG 2402 001). The mandatory information session day/time is Tuesday, January 26, 2016, 5:30-6:15pm.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions in the arts, media, government, business, non-profit or community action sectors. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them to explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory, as well to pursue career options. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is January 29. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students registering for an Internship are required to attend two workshops: Workshop I: Tuesday, February 9th, 12:30pm-1:30pm; Workshop II: Tuesday, March 1th, 12:30pm-1:30pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include "Writing Long Fiction," "Dante's Literary and Historical Background," and "Environmental Design." Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is December 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2403 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Master's Thesis II

2 units Wed
5:30 PM - 6:15 PM

Description

Application: [http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis2.html Description: To pass this class, the student must submit and defend his or her thesis. In the first months of the semester, the student continues to work in collaboration with the adviser to complete the thesis paper or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the artwork as well as the related research essay and other required accompanying materials. All students are required to attend a a mandatory information session during the first week of classes. As prescribed by the online Thesis and Defense calendar, students must receive approval for all work from their adviser far enough in advance of the defense so that the other panelists will have at least four weeks to read and inspect the submission. For more details, please see the additional information about Master's Thesis II on the Gallatin website as well as the thesis and defense calendar and submission forms.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2402. Please note there are two components to this course: an independent study section with hours to be arranged between the student and faculty adviser and a mandatory information session meeting during the first week of the semester. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis II Registration form, available on the Gallatin website. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the student a permission number to register for the independent study section. When students register for the independent study section, they will be automatically enrolled in section one (CORE-GG 2403 001). The mandatory information session day/time is Wednesday, January 27, 2016, 5:30-6:15pm.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335, or Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403, are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2581 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Adaptation: Screenplays and Source Material

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Selma Thompson

Syllabus

Description

How does a story change when re-imagined for a new medium? Why are some film adaptations more successful than others? What is the screenwriter's responsibility to the work being adapted and to its author? Should one always strive to be "true" to the source? How do screenwriters contend with elements of prose such as first-person narrative, point-of-view, authorial voice, and non-linear time? We will examine novels, short stories, memoirs, graphic novels—and the screenplays they inspired—from a screenwriter's perspective, as we consider various adaptation strategies. We also analyze the writing choices behind what might be called "faux adaptations"—original screenplays written as if they were adaptations. A guest speaker from Volunteer Lawyers For The Arts will explain how to correctly secure rights to underlying material. Students keep a journal, part of which may include, with instructor's approval, a short film screenplay adaptation, if the student holds the necessary rights.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (st35@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is January 29. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

ELEC-GG2542 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Telling the Truth

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Scott Korb

Syllabus

Description

The slipperiness of nonfiction writing—ostensibly telling the truth in print—has, in recent years, been the subject of some handwringing in the world of writing and publishing. Jonah Lehrer made up Bob Dylan quotes? David Foster Wallace was a fabricator? Brian Williams lied? John D’Agata failed a fact-check (and then wrote a book with his fact-checker)? These are extreme examples of problems all nonfiction writers face. This nonfiction workshop asks students to try telling the truth in various forms throughout the semester, from memoir to personal essay to literary journalism. All the while, the animating questions will be what it means to tell the truth in these forms and why—or if—telling the truth matters, and whether it is even possible. Is all nonfiction the same? Is any of it ethical? Is, as Janet Malcolm says, the work of a journalist “morally indefensible?” Weekly workshops will engage ideas from readings by Joan Didion, John McPhee, Leslie Jamison, James Baldwin, John Jeremiah Sullivan, James Agee, Zora Neale Hurston, among others.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (smkorb@gmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2717 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Islam and Modernity: Re-thinking Tradition, Cosmopolitanism and Democracy

4 units Tue
4:55 PM - 7:35 PM
Ali Mirsepassi

Syllabus

Description

This graduate seminar will focus upon the broad question of how societies, predominantly influenced by Islamic traditions, might find a home in the modern world on their own terms. We will discuss the possibility of a critical re-thinking of certain modern conventional modes of thinking about modernity, secularism, and democracy. The class will examine notions of citizenship, religion, and globalization in societies that have been historically influenced by Islamic tradition and institutions. This will be done by way of interrogating the works of contemporary scholars of Islamic modernity, including Mohammed Arkoun, Abdullahi An-Na'im, Fatima Mernissi, Talal Asad, Saba Mahmood, and Aziz Al-Azmeh. We will explore questions that cut across the disciplines of history, anthropology, sociology, and law.

Notes

Same as MEIS-GA 1807.

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2719 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Communities And/Of Justice

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Gianpaolo Baiocchi

Description

This course explores scholarly debates about communities and justice. Course material covers longstanding themes, such as state-society relations, democracy and political participation, emergence of political identities, grassroots and netroots, community organizing and urban governance, and social movements. Students will acquire critical literacy in social studies, including the bodies of literature mentioned above that draw on anthropology, political theory, geography and sociology. These insights should be able to inform students’ further critical engagement in the world. Particular attention will be paid to 1) how political problems both reflect and help constitute social practices, identities and inequalities, and 2) how this complex relationship between the ‘social’ and the ‘political’ is manifested on a variety of levels, from global networks and nation-states to cities, regions and local neighborhoods.

Notes

Same as SOC-GA 3000 003. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (gb97@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units
Section 003
Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Bella Mirabella

Description

As the first step in the sequence leading to the thesis, the Thesis Proposal Seminar will move students toward the completion of an acceptable thesis proposal. Students learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate goals that are ambitious but also achievable in a reasonable amount of time and in accordance with the availability of resources. Multiple sections of this course will be offered for students across the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. Please note: unlike other requirements, the Thesis Proposal Seminar is offered only once a year in the spring semester. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit an advanced draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser.

Notes

Pass/fail only. This 2-unit course is taken after the student has completed a Proseminar and generally during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. This course is only offered in the Spring semester. Full-time students admitted in the spring term will need to take the Thesis Proposal Seminar in their third semester. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 27th, in which all sections meet at 1 Washington Place, Room 527. Students should register for section one of this course. After registration ends, students will be assigned to the appropriate section. Students who are planning to take this course in the spring, should register as early as possible.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Stephen Duncombe

Description

As the first step in the sequence leading to the thesis, the Thesis Proposal Seminar will move students toward the completion of an acceptable thesis proposal. Students learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate goals that are ambitious but also achievable in a reasonable amount of time and in accordance with the availability of resources. Multiple sections of this course will be offered for students across the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. Please note: unlike other requirements, the Thesis Proposal Seminar is offered only once a year in the spring semester. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit an advanced draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser.

Notes

Pass/fail only. This 2-unit course is taken after the student has completed a Proseminar and generally during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. This course is only offered in the Spring semester. Full-time students admitted in the spring term will need to take the Thesis Proposal Seminar in their third semester. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 27th, in which all sections meet at 1 Washington Place, Room 527. Students should register for section one of this course. After registration ends, students will be assigned to the appropriate section. Students who are planning to take this course in the spring, should register as early as possible.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units
Section 002
Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Julie Malnig

Description

As the first step in the sequence leading to the thesis, the Thesis Proposal Seminar will move students toward the completion of an acceptable thesis proposal. Students learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate goals that are ambitious but also achievable in a reasonable amount of time and in accordance with the availability of resources. Multiple sections of this course will be offered for students across the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. Please note: unlike other requirements, the Thesis Proposal Seminar is offered only once a year in the spring semester. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit an advanced draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser.

Notes

Pass/fail only. This 2-unit course is taken after the student has completed a Proseminar and generally during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. This course is only offered in the Spring semester. Full-time students admitted in the spring term will need to take the Thesis Proposal Seminar in their third semester. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 27th, in which all sections meet at 1 Washington Place, Room 527. Students should register for section one of this course. After registration ends, students will be assigned to the appropriate section. Students who are planning to take this course in the spring, should register as early as possible.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2545 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

The Shape of the Story: Content into Form

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Dave King

Description

How does the telling transform a story? And how can a story govern itsown telling? In this course for writers in all genres, we consider diverse storytelling strategies, looking at fiction, creative nonfiction and narrative poetry, as well as theater and a few short films. Through exercises in both prose and poetry, we explore how a writer reimagines a project via formal decisions about voice, genre, point of view, diction, even meter and rhyme. The intent is to move us away from comfort zones, to help us draw invention from the unfamiliar and to broaden our literary palettes, so students should be prepared to be daring, open-minded and seriously playful. (Please note that while this is not a workshop in the conventional sense, the instructor will be available during office hours to discuss personal creative projects at the student’s request.) Readings will include works by Amy Hempel, Ryszard Kapuscinski, Vikram Seth, Vladimir Nabokov, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, W G Sebald, Nicholson Baker, Robert Frost, David Foster Wallace, Marjane Satrapi, David Shields and others; also films by Su Friedrich, Maya Deren and Kenneth Anger and performance work by Anna Deaveare Smith and Ruth Draper.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (davekingwriter@gmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean's Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student's work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is January 29. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

SCHOL-GG2602 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

Global Fellowship in Human Rights

2 units Tue
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Description


Type

Scholarly Communities (SCHOL-GG)

ELEC-GG2825 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

The Art of Psalms in Medieval European Culture

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Andrew Romig

Description

“The Art of the Psalms in Medieval European Culture” is a team-taught graduate seminar designed to introduce students, including doctoral candidates, master’s students, and BA/MA students across a range of departments and programs, to the study of the Old Testament Book of Psalms, with particular interest in its collection, dissemination, interpretation, and illustration in medieval manuscripts from roughly the fifth through fifteenth centuries CE. Taught by Kathryn A. Smith (Department of Art History) and Andrew Romig (Gallatin School of Individualized Study), the course takes a multi- and inter-disciplinary approach to medieval cultural study. We will regard the Book of Psalms as a text that was used and reused for multi-layered purposes throughout the European Middle Ages. We will consider the ways in which the Book of Psalms served as an object of and vehicle for veneration, commemoration, and pictorial innovation. We will explore how it both facilitated the expression of cultural identity and served as a means of intercultural connection between contemporary communities and their collective pasts. Finally, we will define “Psalm Art” as broadly as possible, so as to include not only the calligraphic presentation and pictorial illustration of the Psalms, but also the poetics of the Psalms themselves, the arts of translation and exegetical interpretation, and the devotional practices that placed the Psalms at the center of spiritual life for professional and lay Christians alike for more than a millennium. While the course has its foundations in the fields of literature, history, and art history, as well as the study of medieval manuscripts as material artifacts, readings will invite students to use the Psalms as a case study for a wide range of methodological and theoretical pursuits – the history of emotions, gender studies, literary theory, theology, and philosophy, to name just a few. Students will have the opportunity to examine manuscripts in local collections (the Morgan Library, the Columbia University Rare Book Room, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library) and to examine works in both digital and paper facsimile.

Notes

Same as MEDI-GA 2200 001. Team-taught with Kathryn Smith. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructors (ajr6@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2028 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Proseminar: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Culture and Society

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Karen Hornick

Syllabus

Description

Aimed at the needs and interests of students embarking upon the Gallatin MA, this proseminar provides a broad introduction to theories and methods, many of which were developed by humanities scholars, but which also have been influential within social, cultural, and/or political research. Thus, while it will easily accommodate those working within the traditional borders of the humanities, this class is also a good choice for students whose concentration will take a humanities-oriented approach to the study of, for example, media, audiences, gender and sexuality, education, or cultural identity. We will at times focus on fundamental questions such as those used to distinguish art from other forms of human expression—what is “form”? what is “meaning?” Generally, though, our conversations and readings will gravitate towards issues more commonly associated with “society”—although that is yet another term we will have to define. We will read and analyze classic and modern texts (in fields ranging from philosophy, religion, and cultural theory to literature, film, visual art, and music, to anthropology, sociology, and political economy); map major historical periods and schools of thought; develop critical vocabularies; visit common debates (can art be political? should governments fund the humanities? how have technological changes affected culture?); and explore the relationship between the study of the humanities, the making of art, and the structures of society and culture we create and labor within. By the end of the semester, students will have played a strong role in deciding the particular issues we address. In past semesters we have considered affect and public policy, cross-cultural exchange in the globalized present, the (alleged) decline of the humanities in modern education, post-humanism, and the emergence of digital humanities. In addition to writing short responses and a midterm paper, students will conduct a research / critical project on a relevant topic of their own choosing that will culminate in a 15 – 20 page final paper.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2680 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Issues in Arts Politics

4 units Wed
12:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Jack Tchen

Description

This seminar aims to give students both a conceptual and practical grounding in the range of issues and approaches by which arts politics can be understood via the lens of NYC arts and cultural practices in the present and historically. We will think about the complexities that lie between the politics that make art and the politics that art makes—which is to say the array of forces that give rise to specific artistic practices and the agency and efficacy of artistic work. The course will be framed by the following considerations: What are the institutional, discursive, and ideological contexts that shape the objects, images, sounds or texts we call “art?” How can we actively decolonize content but also formal qualities? What are the links between cultural spaces -- the museum, the movie-theater, the gallery, the music/dance hall, the bookstore, the fashion runway, the public street, television, cyber space -- and the larger realm of politics? And how do these relationships impact, implicitly or explicitly, the ways we create, curate, study, or engage with the arts? How do consumers play an active role in the reception of artistic products and practices? What is the relation between formally promulgated cultural policy and the tacit knowledge that artists call upon to get their work into the world? How can the embodied, affective spirit of cultural practices challenge and balance entrenched power? What dimensions of the broader cultural terrain are made legible through artistic practice? What are the means through which art intervenes in the political arena? “Art” will be studied as a site of contested representations and visions, embedded in power formations -- themselves shaped by specific historical moments and geographical locations. Given contemporary global technologies, cultural practices will also be studied within the transnational “travel” of ideas and people. Such germane issues as the legal and constitutional dimensions of censorship, the social formation of taste, the consumption of stars, the bio-politics of the body, transnational copyrights law -- will all pass through an intersectional analyses of gender, race, class, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, and nation, incorporating the insights of such areas of inquiry as decolonizing and dialogic methodologies, affect studies and embodied knowledges, queer studies, and strategizing interventions. Each session is organized around the exploration of a key question, with readings that develop conceptual and practical issues. You’ll also get to meet the Arts Politics community and through them we’ll visit key engaged spaces of the present-past/future in NYC. An approach of critical generosity and ethics of care will be cultivated.

Notes

Same as ASPP-GT 2001 and PERF– GT 2312. Open to Gallatin graduate students only.

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2060 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Of Sylphs, Swans, and Swimmers: Dance Writing and Criticism

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Julie Malnig

Description

In his celebrated essay “Dancers, Buildings, and People in the Streets,” renowned dance critic and poet Edwin Denby wrote that “One part of dance criticism is seeing what is happening onstage. The other is describing clearly what it is you saw.” “Of Sylphs, Swans, and Swimmers: Writing About Dance Performance,” an advanced writing seminar, aims to train students to become critical viewers of dance of various kinds and translate that “looking” into analytical and persuasive prose. The course focuses on writing and thinking critically about dance inclusive of a range of genres among them social and popular dance, concert dance, dance-theater, and musical-theater dance. The ultimate challenge of the course will be to develop a vocabulary to track an essentially non-verbal, ephemeral art form; we will accomplish this through considerations of how space, time, and rhythm are employed in a variety of dance works. The course is also a history of different styles of dance criticism from the early part of the 20th-century to the present. Readings will include works by André Levinson, Edwin Denby, John Martin, Arlene Croce, Marcia Siegel, Joan Acocella, Deborah Jowitt, Brenda Dixon-Gottschild, Thomas DeFrantz, Ann Daly, and others. We will also study the writing in some of the major dance journals in the field among them  Dance Research Journal, Dance Chronicle, and Dance Research . The work of the course consists of essay writing, attendance at dance concerts, and visits by guest critics. Finally, the course will also consider how writing itself is akin to a choreographic endeavor.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (julie.malnig@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2025 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Proseminar: Theory and Methods in the Social Sciences: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Gianpaolo Baiocchi

Syllabus

Description

This seminar, designed for incoming M.A. students, provides a broad introduction to theories and methods that have shaped the interdisciplinary terrain of the social sciences. The course emphasizes the reading of classic and more contemporary works of social theory and methodology, with a focus on key concepts and thinkers. How does one define a society? What is culture? How have social and cultural processes been understood? What is the relationship between a society or culture and a social group, an institution, or an individual? What is the nature of power, difference and identity? How do such foundational questions generate theories of modernity, capitalism, nationalism and globalization? How do such foundational questions orient the variety of disciplines within the social sciences? The course also surveys qualitative and quantitative methodologies, exploring the relationship between theory, methods, and the broader goals of research within the social sciences. Empirically grounded writings will explore the links between research frameworks, methodologies, data collection and theoretical claims. Readings will include classic texts by Karl Marx and Max Weber and more contemporary theorists such as Michel Foucault, David Harvey and Judith Butler, among others. Guest lectures by Gallatin faculty will introduce students to a range of methodologies (ethnography, quantitative data sets, the case study method, documentary analysis, interviewing and survey methods) and interdisciplinary research frameworks.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include “Creating a Magazine,” “Dante’s Literary and Historical Background,” and “Environmental Design.” Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is May 2. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship, students are expected to attend two workshops about internships; keep a journal of their daily internship experiences; submit a progress report describing the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is September 12. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students are required to attend two workshops. Workshop I: Thursday, Sept. 8, 12:30-1:30pm, or Tuesday, Sept 13, 12:30-1:30pm; Workshop II: Tuesday, Oct. 18, 12:30-1:30pm or Thursday, Oct 20, 12:30-1:30pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2403 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Master's Thesis II

2 units Wed
5:30 PM - 6:15 PM

Description

Application: [forthcoming] Description: To pass this class, the student must submit and defend his or her thesis. In the first months of the semester, the student continues to work in collaboration with the adviser to complete the thesis paper or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the artwork as well as the related research essay and other required accompanying materials. All students are required to attend a mandatory information session during the first week of classes. As prescribed by the online Thesis and Defense calendar (http://www.gallatin.nyu.edu/academics/graduate/thesis/calendars.html), students must receive approval for all work from their adviser far enough in advance of the defense so that the other panelists will have at least four weeks to read and inspect the submission. For more details, please see the additional information about Master's Thesis II on the Gallatin website as well as the thesis and defense calendar and submission forms.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2402. This class is an independent study with hours to be arranged between the student and faculty adviser. Students are also required to attend a short information session at the beginning of the semester. In Fall 2016, the mandatory information session day/time is Wednesday, Sept. 7, 5:30-6:15 pm. Please note: the information session meets only one time during the semester. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis II Registration form, available on the Gallatin website. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the student a permission number to register for the course.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student’s work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is September 12. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2402 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Master's Thesis I

2 units Tue
5:30 PM - 6:15 PM

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis1.html Description: In the first months of Master’s Thesis I, the student works under the supervision of a grading instructor (generally, the student’s adviser) but also quite independently and with great focus on the thesis research, project, or artistic work described in the proposals they wrote in the Thesis Proposal Seminar. By the end of the semester, the student will have begun drafting the thesis paper (or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the research essay, artistic aims essay, and other required written supplements to the thesis artwork). Throughout the semester, the student and adviser (the grading instructor for this class) should meet at least four times to discuss ideas and drafts. All students are required to attend a mandatory information session during the first week of classes. To pass this class, students must demonstrate significant progress toward completing the thesis. For more details, please see the additional information about Master’s Thesis I on the Gallatin website.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2401. This class is an independent study with hours to be arranged between the student and faculty adviser. Students are also required to attend a short information session at the beginning of the semester. In Fall 2016, the mandatory information session day/time is Tuesday, Sept. 6, 5:30-6:15 pm. Please note: the information session meets only one time during the semester. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis I Registration form, available on the Gallatin website. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the student a permission number to register for the course.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403, are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin’s private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail Only. Deadline for submitting proposal is September 12. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

ELEC-GG2546 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Writing Fiction in the Digital Age

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Lara Vapnyar

Syllabus

Description

The main goal of this course is to provide students with ways how to enhance traditional storytelling by new technologies without diminishing the role of the written word. We will examine every aspect of the craft of traditional fiction writing: plot, structure, point of view, narrative voice, dialogue, building of individual scenes, etc as well as the new techniques of the digital age: hypertext, visual and audio images, social media. We will learn how to balance the traditional with the new without overwhelming the written text with gadgets. The class will become a creative lab studying ideas by others, coming up with their own, presenting their fiction, responding to the writing of others, and discussing questions about literature, editing, and publishing in the digital age. Each student will create and present to class a work of fiction based on some of the ideas we will be discussing. The works don’t have to be in the electronic form, but the students will need to explain how they would work. Each student will create a basic website with a writer’s profile and portfolio of her works. Readings will include fiction by: Borges, Nabokov, Michael Joyce, Margaret Atwood, Jennifer Egan.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (Vapnyar@hotmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2029 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Proseminar in the Arts: Why Do You Want to Make It, and How Can You Make It Better?

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Nina Katchadourian

Description

This course is intended for Gallatin graduate students in their first or second semester who are likely to pursue an artistic thesis. The class aims to pose difficult and productive questions that will help you understand your tendencies and priorities as an artist, the methods you employ, and where these are in the service of the work as opposed to where they stand in the way. The class requires rigorous and individualized research into your sources of artistic influence with an emphasis on analytical thinking about the methods and strategies employed by those artists or thinkers you consider key influences. The course includes assignments that explore your existing strategies and subject matter in order to understand what has motivated and generated the work thus far. Other assignments push students to work against the grain of their usual modes in order to discover new ways of working and to undermine default strategies. Towards the end of the term, the accumulated insights will be channeled into writing about your work that will be useful in the future context of an artist’s statement or artistic aims essay. In the personal and lab-like atmosphere that this course hopes to cultivate, the class also aims to connect Gallatin graduate students to each other’s work and practice, and to take advantage of the enormous importance that peer input and critique can have on work in progress. Possible side effects include: focused engagement, enhanced motivation, collaboration.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2544 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2016

Fiction Inside Out

4 units Fri
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Meera Nair

Syllabus

Description

In this fiction workshop, we will identify and practice the essential technical elements of fiction writing. We will look under the hood, take the back off the clock, peer into the innards, in order to study the formal decisions necessary for effective story-telling. Our inquiry will include point of entry; character and plot; creating meaningful scenes; interiority v/s external action; exposition; the management of time; the position of the narrator; linear v/s modular design; dialogue and its uses; conflict and resolution; image systems and so on. Fun exercises that encourage play, class readings, technique essays and student work will be points of departure for our enquiries into the internal workings of fiction. Readings may include Bausch, Gordon, Coetzee, Marcus, Mueenuddin Jin, Ngochi Adiche and craft essays by Baxter, Gass, Scoffield and Hrijbal among others.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (meerav3@gmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2029 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Proseminar in the Arts: Why Do You Want to Make It, and How Can You Make It Better?

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Nina Katchadourian

Description

This course is intended for Gallatin graduate students with a creative project component to their graduate study. At its heart, the class aims to pose difficult and productive questions that will help you understand your tendencies and priorities as an artist, the methods you employ, and where these are in the service of the work as opposed to where they stand in the way. The class requires rigorous and individualized research into your sources of artistic influence with an emphasis on analytical thinking about the methods and strategies employed by those artists or thinkers you consider key influences. The course includes assignments that explore your existing strategies and subject matter in order to understand what has motivated and generated the work thus far. Other assignments push students to work against the grain of their usual modes in order to discover new ways of working and to undermine default strategies. Towards the end of the term, the accumulated insights will be channeled into writing about your work that will be useful in the future context of an artist’s statement or artistic aims essay. In the personal and lab-like atmosphere that this course hopes to cultivate, the class also aims to connect Gallatin graduate students to each other’s work and practice, and to take advantage of the enormous importance that peer input and critique can have on work in progress. Possible side effects include: focused engagement, enhanced motivation, collaboration.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2402 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Master's Thesis I

2 units

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis1.html Description: In Master’s Thesis I, students will complete the basic research for and begin drafting the thesis. The course, which is a two credit course supervised by the student’s advisor, will entail independent work, supported by the writing resources of the MA Program. Students: (1) must attend a meeting (registered students will be emailed information about place and time at the beginning of the semester) with the MA Program faculty and staff to discuss the overall goals of the course; (2) immerse themselves in the relevant scholarly discourses and literatures and begin drafting the thesis and, in the case of artistic theses, developing the artwork and accompanying research essay ; (3) meet with their advisers, on a regular basis, to consult on the content, logic, organization and methods for the thesis; (4) draw on the resources of the MA Program (e.g. individual consultations, organized peer writing groups, themed writing workshops) led by Gallatin M.A. program staff; (5) and at the end of the semester, present their work in progress by participating in a forum organized by Gallatin and attended by faculty and peers. To pass this course, in addition to fulfilling the presentation requirement, students must demonstrate significant progress toward completing the thesis. For more details, please see the additional information about Master’s Thesis I on the Gallatin website.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2401.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2670 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Transnational Cinema

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Rahul Hamid

Description

Film has always been an international medium. During the silent era films were exported with title cards of different languages, so that the same images could cross linguistic borders. With the coming of sound language came to identify films more closely with their country of origin and the discourse of nationhood. As time has passed and films are increasingly funded by multiple sources from many different nations and regions a new conception of transnational cinema has emerged. In this course we will try to understand the many forms that transnational cinema takes, ranging from huge mass market co-productions to small art films designed for the International festival circuit. We will try to answer such questions as how do these films express national identity both politically and stylistically? How do transnational aesthetics interact with the idea of the  auteur  and with national identity? The course will examine various examples of transnational cinema originating in India, Senegal, Hong Kong, and the European Union. Students will engage with theorizations of the Transnational, as well as post colonial theory, conceptions of third cinema, and genre theory.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2028 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Proseminar: Theory and Methods in the Humanities: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Karen Hornick

Syllabus

Description

This seminar, designed for incoming M.A. students, provides a broad introduction to theories and methods that have shaped research in the humanities. We will read and analyze classic and modern works in fields ranging from philosophy and religion to literature and visual art, representative literary and dramatic works as well as works of theory and historiography. Early weeks of the course will be organized around texts and images representative of the major historical periods used to organize Western humanities research—the ancient world, the early modern period (“Renaissance”), and Enlightenment and Modernity. After that initial period, the syllabus will focus on major questions, themes, methods, and terms that recur frequently in contemporary humanities research: language, value and taste, form and content, interpretation and criticism, close reading, the uses of history, theorizing, cross-cultural influence and exchange, and the relationship between the disciplines of the humanities and those of the social sciences. In the last phase of the semester, we will apply everything discussed so far to a number of readings representative of the “big” preoccupations of the moment. Students in the class will have a strong voice in determining what those issues are, but they might include the study of affect, cross-cultural exchange in the globalized present, the humanities in modern education and public policy, post-humanism, or the digital humanities. In addition to short response postings and a midterm paper, students will conduct a research / critical project on a relevant topic of their own choosing that will culminate in a 15 – 20 page final paper. Guest lectures by Gallatin faculty will introduce students to a range of methodologies and interdisciplinary research frameworks.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2025 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Proseminar: Theory and Methods in the Social Sciences: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Ritty Lukose

Syllabus

Description

This seminar, designed for incoming M.A. students, provides a broad introduction to theories and methods that have shaped the interdisciplinary terrain of the social sciences. The course emphasizes the reading of classic and more contemporary works of social theory and methodology, with a focus on key concepts and thinkers. How does one define a society? What is culture? How have social and cultural processes been understood? What is the relationship between a society or culture and a social group, an institution, or an individual? What is the nature of power, difference and identity? How do such foundational questions generate theories of modernity, capitalism, nationalism and globalization? How do such foundational questions orient the variety of disciplines within the social sciences? The course also surveys qualitative and quantitative methodologies, exploring the relationship between theory, methods, and the broader goals of research within the social sciences. Empirically grounded writings will explore the links between research frameworks, methodologies, data collection and theoretical claims. Readings will include classic texts by Karl Marx and Max Weber and more contemporary theorists such as Michel Foucault, David Harvey and Judith Butler, among others. Guest lectures by Gallatin faculty will introduce students to a range of methodologies (ethnography, quantitative data sets, the case study method, documentary analysis, interviewing and survey methods) and interdisciplinary research frameworks.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2840 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Citizenship Culture: Art, Urban Governance and Public Participation

2 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Antanas Mockus

Description

In January 1995, Antanas Mockus became Mayor of Bogotá, Colombia. Over two non-consecutive terms of three years each, he assumed the challenge of governing a city in crisis, disrupted by chaos, corruption, and violence. He did so by fostering a cultural transformation through attention to pedagogy, public policy, and art—an approach to governing that he calls “Citizenship Culture.” This course examines theoretical, governmental, and public discussions around individual behaviors that have a collective impact—both desirable (like saving water or paying voluntary taxes) and harmful (law-breaking, tax evasion, and intolerance). During the course, students at NYU will work on collaborative projects with graduate students in Vilnius, Lithuania, and Bogota, Colombia. We will begin by reviewing the case of Bogotá. We then use readings on politics and public policy to generate reflections on the relationship between social structure, civic culture, and individual decision-making. Course material may include readings by Jürgen Habermas, Basil Bernstein, John Elster, Doris Sommer, Raymond Fisman and Edward Miguel.

Notes

This 2-unit course meets the first seven weeks only. Registration is by permission of the instructor. To request permission, send a short note to gallatin.global@nyu.edu explaining your interest in and previous experience with the themes of the course. In the note, indicate which of the authors listed in the course description, if any, you have already studied. Please allow 2-3 weeks for a decision.

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2403 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Master's Thesis II

2 units

Description

Application: [forthcoming] Description: To pass this class, which is a two-credit course supervised by the student’s advisor, the student must submit and defend thesis. In the first months of the semester, the student continues to work in collaboration with the adviser to complete the thesis paper or, in the case of an artistic thesis, the artwork as well as the related research essay and other required accompanying materials. All students are required to attend one meeting at the start of the semester (registered students will be emailed information about place and time at the beginning of the semester) with MA Program faculty and staff to discuss the overall goals of the course. Finally, students should draw on the resources of the MA Program (individual consultations with writing specialists, peer writing groups, themed writing workshops) during the writing process. As prescribed by the online Thesis and Defense calendar (http://www.gallatin.nyu.edu/academics/graduate/thesis/calendars.html), students must receive approval for all work from their adviser far enough in advance of the defense so that the other panelists will have at least four weeks to read and inspect the submission. For more details, please see the additional information about Master's Thesis II on the Gallatin website as well as the thesis and defense calendar and submission forms.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2402.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City’s many social institutions in the arts, media, government, business, nonprofit or community action sectors. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them to explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory, as well to pursue career options. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work anywhere from 8 to 24 hours each week; for each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is September 8. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students are required to attend two workshops. Workshop I: Sept. 17, 12:30pm-1:30pm; Workshop II: Oct.15, 12:30pm-1:30pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

ELEC-GG2770 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Demi-Mondes and Dance Worlds

4 units Tue
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Julie Malnig

Description

Worlds of social dance often find their genesis among artists, rebels, non-conformists, and others who are deliberately or accidently marginal to mainstream capitalist culture. From the bordellos of Buenos Aires, where tango was born, to the honky-tonks of Nashville, to the jazz clubs of New Orleans and New York, to say nothing of contemporary raves, social dance’s roots may be found in transgressive behavior. Dancers in these scenes are often referred to as obsessed, addicted, and out of control. But whose control? In this course we examine the relation of the moving body to music and transgression, analyzing the way aesthetic styles create demimondes and subcultures that transform gender relations and public affect writ large. Beginning with theories of the aesthetic that explain the power of the body in cultural expression, we move on to examine dance worlds in their historical and ethnographic context, paying close attention to the politics of the body and its influence on changing parameters of social permissibility. We will also explore dancers’ efforts to test behaviors and assert identities outside the confines of the ordered, everyday world and consider what qualities are lost or gained when these dances become adopted for mainstream consumption. We will read works by Pierre Bourdieu, Marcel Mauss, Jacques Ranciere, Jose Munoz, Jane Desmond, Sarah Thornton, Fiona Buckland, Robert Farris Thompson, Julie Taylor, Juliet McMains, Frances Aparicio, Marta Savigliano, Barbara Browning, and Tricia Rose, among others.

Notes

Same as PERF-GT- 2311. Team-taught with Prof. Deborah Kapchan (from Tisch).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2780 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

The Poetics of Knowledge in South Asia and the Middle East

4 units Wed
4:55 PM - 7:35 PM
Nosheen Ali

Description

This course will examine how poetic thought and practice shapes notions of history, self, collectivity, and change in South Asia and the Middle East. The course considers “poetic knowledge” as a term that might encapsulate the value and meaning of the poetic as a mode of being, seeing and doing in the world. We will delve into the breadth and depth of non-Western literary thought, theory and practice in South Asia and the Middle East, reading key texts by poets, historians, and anthropologists including A. K. Ramanujan, Ann Gold, Lila Abu-Lughod, Steve Caton, and Sheldon Pollock. Alongside, we will read selected, poetic texts in translation from a variety of languages including Braj, Urdu, Persian, Sindhi, and Punjabi. Course themes include poetic knowledge as a reflection on history and society, gender and power in poetic traditions, poetry and political critique, and the relationship between poetic idiom and spiritual subjectivity.

Notes

Same as HIST-GA1001 and MEIS-GA 2715. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (nosheen.ali@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2546 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Writing Fiction in the Digital Age

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Lara Vapnyar

Syllabus

Description

The main goal of this course is to provide students with ways how to enhance traditional storytelling by new technologies without diminishing the role of the written word. We will examine every aspect of the craft of traditional fiction writing: plot, structure, point of view, narrative voice, dialogue, building of individual scenes, etc as well as the new techniques of the digital age: hypertext, visual and audio images, social media. We will learn how to balance the traditional with the new without overwhelming the written text with gadgets. The class will become a creative lab studying ideas by others, coming up with their own, presenting their fiction, responding to the writing of others, and discussing questions about literature, editing, and publishing in the digital age. Each student will create and present to class a work of fiction based on some of the ideas we will be discussing. The works don’t have to be in the electronic form, but the students will need to explain how they would work. Each student will create a basic website with a writer’s profile and portfolio of her works. Readings will include fiction by: Borges, Nabokov, Michael Joyce, Margaret Atwood, Jennifer Egan.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (Vapnyar@hotmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2648 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Media Historiography

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Moya Luckett

Syllabus

Description

This course explores both theories and practices of media history and analyzes how media more generally contribute to the writing of history. We consider how media’s ability to document the present—both in fiction and non-fiction—provides an archive of the recent past, in turn presenting the illusion of a more complete popular memory of the last century or so. In addition to parsing the relationship between history, the past, and mass media, we consider the stakes of writing media history more broadly. What factors do we need to consider in writing about the past and how do we treat the materials that we use in our enquiries? As the media’s complexity and its own diverse stakes shape its history, we explore divisions between social, aesthetic, cultural and technological media histories and the more business-minded institutional and economic studies. In examining the materials used to write media histories—primary and secondary sources, archival records, trade and fan press, promotional materials and social documents—we think about the problems of asserting truth, both on screens and the printed page. We also consider the particular difficulties and significance of writing the history of popular media, especially given their seductive, if often false, claims to "reality." Readings include selections from Gitelman,  Always Already New: Media, History and the Data of Culture ; Rosen,  Change Mummified: Cinema, Historicity, Theory ; Lewis and Smoodin,  Looking Past the Screen: Case Studies in American Film History and Method ; and Carr,  What Is History ?

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (moya.luckett@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student’s work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is September 8. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include “Creating a Magazine,” “Dante’s Literary and Historical Background,” and “Environmental Design.” Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is May 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335, or Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403, are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2548 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Storytelling: Writing Techniques for Fiction and Nonfiction

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Christopher Bram

Syllabus

Description

Whether you are writing fiction or nonfiction, story is an important part of prose. Story here is not just narrative but order, sequence, and structure. Learning the right order for your sentences and thoughts is as important as learning how to put one foot in front of the other when learning to walk. In this course we will explore different ways to lay out actions and ideas, whether you're writing a novel, a book of history, an opinion piece, an essay or a short story. We will examine the best ways to make notes and sketch out early drafts as you find your voice and structure. You will gain practice in rewriting. And we will look at some different approaches to story by reading such writers as Milan Kundera, Janet Malcolm, Truman Capote, George Orwell, Sigrid Nunez, and Primo Levi. Students will submit for workshop two separate projects, one a work of fiction and the other a work of nonfiction, in at least two drafts each. In the end you are expected to produce a minimum of forty finished pages.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (chris.bram@yahoo.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin’s private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail Only. Deadline for submitting proposal is September 8. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student’s work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Tuesday, May 26. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Independent Study

4 units
Section 002

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student’s work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, July 6. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City’s many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work an average of 10 to 20 hours each week at the site and meet regularly during the semester with their faculty adviser to discuss the internship. For each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship, students are expected to attend two workshops about internships; keep a journal of their daily internship experiences; submit a progress report describing the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Tuesday, May 26. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu)

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Internship

4 units
Section 002

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City’s many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work an average of 10 to 20 hours each week at the site and meet regularly during the semester with their faculty adviser to discuss the internship. For each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship, students are expected to attend two workshops about internships; keep a journal of their daily internship experiences; submit a progress report describing the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, July 6. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu)

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2402 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Master's Thesis I

2 units

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis1.html DESCRIPTION: In the first months of Master’s Thesis I, the student works under the supervision of a grading instructor (generally, the student’s adviser) but also quite independently and with great focus on the thesis research, project, or artistic work described in the proposals they wrote in the Thesis Proposal Seminar. By the end of the semester, the student will have begun drafting the thesis paper (or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the research essay, artistic aims essay, and other required written supplements to the thesis artwork). Throughout the semester, the student and adviser (the grading instructor for this class) should meet at least four times to discuss ideas and drafts. All students are required to attend a series of four drafting and writing workshops To pass this class, students must demonstrate significant progress toward completing the thesis. For more details, please see the additional information about Master’s Thesis I on the Gallatin website.

Notes

Session I: May 26 - July 2. Before enrolling in this course, students should confirm their adviser is available during the summer months to supervise work on the thesis. In addition, students are expected to meet with support staff (these meetings will be arranged as the session starts).

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2403 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Master's Thesis II

2 units

Description

Application: [forthcoming] Description: To pass this class, the student must submit and defend his or her thesis. In the first months of the semester, the student continues to work in collaboration with the adviser to complete the thesis paper or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the artwork as well as the related research essay and other required accompanying materials. All students are required to attend a number of writing workshops to aid this process. As prescribed by the online Thesis and Defense calendar, students must receive approval for all work from their adviser far enough in advance of the defense so that the other panelists will have at least four weeks to read and inspect the submission. For more details, please see the additional information about Master's Thesis II on the Gallatin website as well as the thesis and defense calendar and submission forms.

Notes

Session I: May 26 - July 2. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2402. Before enrolling in this course, students should confirm their adviser is available during the summer months to supervise work on the thesis. In addition, students are expected to meet with support staff (these meetings will be arranged as the session starts).

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Tuesday, May 26. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu)

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Private Lesson

4 units
Section 002

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, July 6. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu)

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they registered for Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403 (or Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335), are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Thesis Advisement

1 units
Section 002

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semesterin which they registered for Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403 (or Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335), are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Tutorial

4 units
Section 002

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include “Creating a Magazine,” “Dante’s Literary and Historical Background,” and “Environmental Design.” Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Wednesday, April 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include “Creating a Magazine,” “Dante’s Literary and Historical Background,” and “Environmental Design.” Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Wednesday, April 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean's Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student's work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is January 30. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

ELEC-GG2542 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Telling the Truth

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Scott Korb

Syllabus

Description

The slipperiness of nonfiction writing—ostensibly telling the truth in print—has, in recent years, been the subject of some handwringing in the world of writing and publishing. Jonah Lehrer made up Bob Dylan quotes? David Foster Wallace was a fabricator? Jane Goodall plagiarized? John D’Agata failed a fact-check (and then wrote a book with his fact-checker)? These are extreme examples of problems all nonfiction writers face. This nonfiction workshop asks students to try telling the truth in various forms throughout the semester, from memoir to personal essay to literary journalism. All the while, the animating questions will be what it means to tell the truth in these forms and why—or if—telling the truth matters, and whether it is even possible. Is all nonfiction the same? Is any of it ethical? Is, as Janet Malcolm says, the work of a journalist “morally indefensible?” Weekly workshops will engage ideas from readings by Joan Didion, John McPhee, Leslie Jamison, James Baldwin, John Jeremiah Sullivan, James Agee, Roxanne Gay, among others.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (smkorb@gmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is January 30. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2403 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Master's Thesis II

2 units
Section 002
Thu
6:20 PM - 8:20 PM

Description

Application: [forthcoming] Description: To pass this class, the student must submit and defend his or her thesis. In the first months of the semester, the student continues to work in collaboration with the adviser to complete the thesis paper or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the artwork as well as the related research essay and other required accompanying materials. All students are required to attend a number of writing workshops to aid this process. As prescribed by the online Thesis and Defense calendar, students must receive approval for all work from their adviser far enough in advance of the defense so that the other panelists will have at least four weeks to read and inspect the submission. For more details, please see the additional information about Master's Thesis II on the Gallatin website as well as the thesis and defense calendar and submission forms.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2402. Please note there are two components to this course: an independent study section with hours to be arranged between the student and faculty adviser and a workshop that meets four times during the course of the semester. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis II Registration form, available on the Gallatin website. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the student a permission number to register for the independent study section. When students register for the independent study section, they will be prompted to select one of the workshop sections (CORE-GG 2403 001 or CORE-GG 2403 002). Section I of the workshop (CORE-GG 2403 001) meets January 26, February 23, March 30 and April 20; Section II of the workshop (CORE-GG 2403 002) meets January 29, February, 26, April 2 and April 30.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2403 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Master's Thesis II

2 units Mon
6:20 PM - 8:20 PM

Description

Application: [forthcoming] Description: To pass this class, the student must submit and defend his or her thesis. In the first months of the semester, the student continues to work in collaboration with the adviser to complete the thesis paper or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the artwork as well as the related research essay and other required accompanying materials. All students are required to attend a number of writing workshops to aid this process. As prescribed by the online Thesis and Defense calendar, students must receive approval for all work from their adviser far enough in advance of the defense so that the other panelists will have at least four weeks to read and inspect the submission. For more details, please see the additional information about Master's Thesis II on the Gallatin website as well as the thesis and defense calendar and submission forms.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2402. Please note there are two components to this course: an independent study section with hours to be arranged between the student and faculty adviser and a workshop that meets four times during the course of the semester. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis II Registration form, available on the Gallatin website. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the student a permission number to register for the independent study section. When students register for the independent study section, they will be prompted to select one of the workshop sections (CORE-GG 2403 001 or CORE-GG 2403 002). Section I of the workshop (CORE-GG 2403 001) meets January 26, February 23, March 30 and April 20; Section II of the workshop (CORE-GG 2403 002) meets January 29, February, 26, April 2 and April 30.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2758 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Life After Lockdown: Critical Perspectives on Justice Through Creative Writing and Performance

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bryonn Bain

Description

Half a century after Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X began discussing plans to put the United States on trial for widespread human rights violations, the inhumane conditions they witnessed persist today and now impact millions more in prisons, on parole and probation. In this course, we will use critical texts, creative writing and performance to engage the stories and lessons learned by those dehumanized incarceration in America. While critically examining texts by and about the impact and experiences of the prison industrial complex, we will research, write, record, workshop and perform original verse for the page and the stage. Our interrogation of the meanings and movements for justice will be guided by a diversity of prose, poetry, political and philosophical texts ranging from Imhotep, Plato, Aristotle and Rousseau, to Immortal Technique, Public Enemy, Assata Shakur and the RZA. Special guests will include formerly incarcerated activists, artists, educators, experts and leaders in the arts as well as in prison reform and abolition.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (bryonnrollybain@gmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2545 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

The Shape of the Story: Content into Form

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Dave King

Description

How does the telling transform a story? And how can a story govern its own telling? In this course for writers of fiction and nonfiction, we consider diverse storytelling strategies, looking at fiction, creative nonfiction and narrative poetry, as well as a few short films. Through exercises in both prose and poetry, we explore how a writer reimagines a project via formal decisions about voice, genre, point of view, diction, even meter and rhyme. The intent is to move us away from comfort zones, to help us draw invention from the unfamiliar and to broaden our literary palettes, so students should be prepared to be daring, open-minded and seriously playful. (Please note that while this is not a workshop in the conventional sense, the instructor will be available during office hours to discuss personal creative projects at the student’s request.) Readings will include works by Amy Hempel, Ryszard Kapuscinski, Vikram Seth, Vladimir Nabokov, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Nicholson Baker, Robert Frost, David Foster Wallace, Marjane Satrapi, David Shields and others; also films by Su Friedrich, Maya Deren and Kenneth Anger.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (davekingwriter@gmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2018 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Proseminar: Interdisciplinary Critical Theory in Practice

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Karen Hornick

Syllabus

Description

Historical and technological developments have changed ideas about cultural consumption. Is the mass audience itself a product of the goods and entertainment it consumes (as midcentury ideology theorists believed) or is it an outmoded concept lost in the wake of globalization, the sharp focusing techniques of digital marketing, crowd sourcing, and participatory culture? What are the implications of these developments for aesthetic appreciation, the formation of pleasure and desire, the relationship between culture and politics? Where do you stand as a critic, scholar, or artist in relation to such questions? This proseminar attempts to reach students with interests, practical or theoretical, in one or more of the following fields: media studies, literary and art criticism, history, sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, and philosophy (particularly aesthetics). Among the topics to be discussed are: the history of asserted differences between high and low art; the mass reproduction and commodification of art; critical judgement and the differences between fans and experts. Class readings will include a mix of major theoretical writings, histories, and a variety of primary materials including literary texts, films, and performances. Authors may include Charles Baudelaire, Willa Cather, Walter Benjamin, Dwight Macdonald, Linda Williams, Henry Jenkins, and Carl Wilson.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions in the arts, media, government, business, non-profit or community action sectors. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them to explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory, as well to pursue career options. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work anywhere from 8 to 24 hours each week; for each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is January 30. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students registering for an Internship are required to attend two workshops: Workshop I: Tuesday, February 10th, 12:30pm-1:45pm; Workshop II: Tuesday, March 10th, 12:30pm-1:45pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2025 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Proseminar: Theory and Methods in the Social Sciences: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
David Moore

Description

For students whose programs have included investigations of the social world, this course provides an opportunity to grapple with a variety of theoretical approaches to the study of individuals, groups, organizations, cultures and societies, and to engage several methods for conducting research in those realms. Depending on students’ interests and goals, the theoretical frameworks might include behaviorism (Watson, Skinner), interactionism (GH Mead, Blumer), constructivism (Piaget, Vygotsky, Bruner), conflict (Marx, the Frankfurt School), psychodynamics (Freud, Erikson), structuralism (Saussure, Levi-Strauss), and/or postmodernism (Foucault, Baudrillard). The class will explore the different premises, logics and arguments of various schools of thought. Moreover, members will conduct pilot-level research using methods appropriate to their problematics: e.g., ethnographic observations, interviews, discourse analysis, document study, visual anthropology, psychometric tests, and/or case studies. The course will be a useful preliminary for students expecting to do a research thesis focused on questions about the social world.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2402 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Master's Thesis I

2 units Mon
6:20 PM - 8:20 PM

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis1.html DESCRIPTION: In the first months of Master’s Thesis I, the student works under the supervision of a grading instructor (generally, the student’s adviser) but also quite independently and with great focus on the thesis research, project, or artistic work described in the proposals they wrote in the Thesis Proposal Seminar. By the end of the semester, the student will have begun drafting the thesis paper (or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the research essay, artistic aims essay, and other required written supplements to the thesis artwork). Throughout the semester, the student and adviser (the grading instructor for this class) should meet at least four times to discuss ideas and drafts. All students are required to attend a series of four drafting and writing workshops To pass this class, students must demonstrate significant progress toward completing the thesis. For more details, please see the additional information about Master’s Thesis I on the Gallatin website.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2401. Please note there are two components to this course: an independent study section with hours to be arranged between the student and faculty adviser and a workshop that meets four times during the course of the semester. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis I Registration form, available on the Gallatin website. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the student a permission number to register for the independent study section. When students register for the independent study section, they will be automatically enrolled in the workshop section (CORE-GG 2402 001). The workshop meets four times: February 2, March 9, April 13, and April 27.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2765 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

The Politics and Anti-Politics of NGOs

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Gianpaolo Baiocchi

Syllabus

Description

Over the last two decades Non-Governmental Organizations, or NGOs, have played an increasingly active and visible role in international aid, disaster relief, development, post-conflict rebuilding, and local governance. They have received increasing amounts of aid and development dollars, in many cases supplanting more traditional actors, like governments. They have thus provided fodder for exciting and contentious academic and public debates marked by extreme positions: Are NGOs the solution to some of the world’s most difficult problems, or are they trojan horses for neoliberal reforms? Do they represent a form of global civil society, or simply a circulation of elites? This course steps back and offers a broader perspective, by introducing students to the critical analysis of non-governmental organizations and their role in shaping global institutions and domestic political and social change. It locates NGOs within the web of transnational assemblages that they operate in, and pays attention to the experiences and practices of “local” populations that fall in and out of the category of “client.” We draw from a range of literatures to inform our analysis: democratic theory around citizenship and civil society; theories of the state; critical studies of development; and analyses of social movements, institutions and global networks. We focus on a few emblematic cases of transnational NGOs and their consequences, including Human Rights, Fair Trade, and alter-globalization NGOs.

Notes

Same as SOC-GA 3442. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (gb97@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include "Writing Long Fiction," "Dante's Literary and Historical Background," and "Environmental Design." Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is December 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335, or Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403, are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units
Section 003
Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Bella Mirabella

Syllabus

Description

As the first step in the sequence leading to the thesis, the Thesis Proposal Seminar will move students toward the completion of an acceptable thesis proposal. Students learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate goals that are ambitious but also achievable in a reasonable amount of time and in accordance with the availability of resources. Multiple sections of this course will be offered for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. Please note: unlike other requirements in the thesis and defense sequence of classes, the Thesis Proposal Seminar is offered only once a year in the spring semester. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit an advanced draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser.

Notes

Pass/fail only. This 2-unit course is taken after the student has completed a Proseminar and generally during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. This course is only offered in the Spring semester. Full-time students admitted in the spring term will need to take the Thesis Proposal Seminar in their third semester. Section 3 is for students who intend to complete an artistic thesis. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 27th, in which all sections meet at 1 Washington Place, Room 527.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units
Section 002
Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Ritty Lukose

Syllabus

Description

As the first step in the sequence leading to the thesis, the Thesis Proposal Seminar will move students toward the completion of an acceptable thesis proposal. Students learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate goals that are ambitious but also achievable in a reasonable amount of time and in accordance with the availability of resources. Multiple sections of this course will be offered for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. Please note: unlike other requirements in the thesis and defense sequence of classes, the Thesis Proposal Seminar is offered only once a year in the spring semester. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit an advanced draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser.

Notes

Pass/fail only. This 2-unit course is taken after the student has completed a Proseminar and generally during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. This course is only offered in the Spring semester. Full-time students admitted in the spring term will need to take the Thesis Proposal Seminar in their third semester. Section 2 is for students who intend to complete a thesis drawing largely from research in the fields of the social sciences. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 27th, in which all sections meet at 1 Washington Place, Room 527.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Nina Cornyetz

Syllabus

Description

As the first step in the sequence leading to the thesis, the Thesis Proposal Seminar will move students toward the completion of an acceptable thesis proposal. Students learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate goals that are ambitious but also achievable in a reasonable amount of time and in accordance with the availability of resources. Multiple sections of this course will be offered for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. Please note: unlike other requirements in the thesis and defense sequence of classes, the Thesis Proposal Seminar is offered only once a year in the spring semester. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit an advanced draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser.

Notes

Pass/fail only. This 2-unit course is taken after the student has completed a Proseminar and generally during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. This course is only offered in the Spring semester. Full-time students admitted in the spring term will need to take the Thesis Proposal Seminar in their third semester. Section 1 is for students who intend to complete a thesis drawing largely from research in the fields of the humanities. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 28th, in which all sections meet at 1 Washington Place, Room 527.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Private Lesson

4 units
Section 002

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, July 7. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu)

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Tuesday, May 27. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu)

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Tutorial

4 units
Section 002

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include “Creating a Magazine,” “Dante’s Literary and Historical Background,” and “Environmental Design.” Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, April 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include “Creating a Magazine,” “Dante’s Literary and Historical Background,” and “Environmental Design.” Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, April 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City’s many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work an average of 10 to 20 hours each week at the site and meet regularly during the semester with their faculty adviser to discuss the internship. For each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship, students are expected to attend two workshops about internships; keep a journal of their daily internship experiences; submit a progress report describing the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Tuesday, May 27. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu)

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Internship

4 units
Section 002

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City’s many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work an average of 10 to 20 hours each week at the site and meet regularly during the semester with their faculty adviser to discuss the internship. For each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship, students are expected to attend two workshops about internships; keep a journal of their daily internship experiences; submit a progress report describing the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, July 7. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu)

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student’s work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Tuesday, May 27. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Independent Study

4 units
Section 002

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student’s work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, July 7. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2402 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Master's Thesis I

2 units Mon
6:20 PM - 8:20 PM

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis1.html Description: In Master’s Thesis I, students will complete the basic research for and begin drafting the thesis. The course will entail independent work and mandatory participation in collaborative and group work. Students: (1) immerse themselves in the relevant scholarly discourses and literatures and begin drafting the thesis; (2) meet with their advisers at least four times to consult on the content, logic, organization and methods for the thesis; (3) attend four sessions organized and led by Gallatin M.A. program writing staff; (4) and at the end of the semester, present their work in progress by participating in a conference organized by Gallatin. To pass this course, in addition to fulfilling the presentation requirement, students must demonstrate significant progress toward completing the thesis. For more details, please see the additional information about Master’s Thesis I on the Gallatin website.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2401. Please note there are two components to this course: an independent study section with hours to be arranged between the student and faculty adviser and a workshop that meets four times during the course of the semester. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis I Registration form, available on the Gallatin website. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the permission number required to register for the independent study section. After registering for an independent study section, students will be prompted to select one of the workshop sections (CORE-GG 2401 001 or CORE-GG 2401 002). Section I of the workshop (CORE-GG 2401 001) meets four times: Sept. 8, Sept. 22, Oct. 20, Nov. 10; section II of the workshop (CORE-GG 2401 002) meets four times: Sept. 15, Sept. 29, Oct. 27, and Nov. 17.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2402 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Master's Thesis I

2 units
Section 002
Mon
6:20 PM - 8:20 PM

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis1.html Description: In Master’s Thesis I, students will complete the basic research for and begin drafting the thesis. The course will entail independent work and mandatory participation in collaborative and group work. Students: (1) immerse themselves in the relevant scholarly discourses and literatures and begin drafting the thesis; (2) meet with their advisers at least four times to consult on the content, logic, organization and methods for the thesis; (3) attend four sessions organized and led by Gallatin M.A. program writing staff; (4) and at the end of the semester, present their work in progress by participating in a conference organized by Gallatin. To pass this course, in addition to fulfilling the presentation requirement, students must demonstrate significant progress toward completing the thesis. For more details, please see the additional information about Master’s Thesis I on the Gallatin website.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2401. Please note there are two components to this course: an independent study section with hours to be arranged between the student and faculty adviser and a workshop that meets four times during the course of the semester. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis I Registration form, available on the Gallatin website. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the permission number required to register for the independent study section. After registering for an independent study section, students will be prompted to select one of the workshop sections (CORE-GG 2401 001 or CORE-GG 2401 002). Section I of the workshop (CORE-GG 2401 001) meets four times: Sept. 8, Sept. 22, Oct. 20, and Nov. 10; section II of the workshop (CORE-GG 2401 002) meets four times: Sept. 15, Sept. 29, Oct. 27, and Nov. 17.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2716 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Culture and Society: A Seminar on Critical Social Theory

4 units Tue Thu
5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Ali Mirsepassi

Description

This interdisciplinary seminar will examine a critical debate on culture and society. We will explore theories emphasizing structural or “material” determinism, as well as intellectual currents privileging “cultural” explanations. Excessive emphasis on the cultural unhelpfully blurs the economic and other aspects of social life, while reductive fixation on economic moorings suggests subordination of social life to the structural imperatives of the market. The course proposes a nuanced understanding of human behaviors, social interactions and their forms of subjectivity. The central question will be: how are hegemonic meanings produced and made to become a “normal” part of our political, intellectual, and moral life? And how do such meaning-making processes shape the organization of spaces, policies and population within dominant discourses of modernity and development, as well as the emergence of forms of resistance to these economic imaginaries and practices. We will analyze the ‘cultural political economy’ problem, or culture and society, within four possible analytical frameworks: social science methodology; everyday life; culture and human rights; and state theory. Readings will include selections from the works of Max Weber, Antonio Gramsci, Michel Foucault, Michel de Certeau, Amartya Sen, James Scott, Emile Durkheim and Karl Marx.

Notes

Session II: July 7 - August 15. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (am128@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2340 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master’s Thesis and Defense, K70.2335, are required to register for Thesis Advisement (1 credit) each semester (including the summer, if you plan on graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. This 1-credit course is not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master’s degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

Session I: May 27 - July 3

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2340 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Thesis Advisement

1 units
Section 002

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master’s Thesis and Defense, K70.2335, are required to register for Thesis Advisement (1 credit) each semester (including the summer, if you plan on graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. This 1-credit course is not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master’s degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

Session II: July 7 - August 15

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2335 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Master's Thesis and Defense

3 units Wed
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Karen Hornick

Description

Students registering for this course meet in the beginning of the semester with the thesis reviewer to discuss the procedures for organizing and presenting the thesis. It then becomes an independent project with the student’s adviser to complete the thesis. Students are required to register for Thesis and Defense when they have completed 37 credits in the M.A. program. Master’s Thesis and Defense is a required graduate core course for students who started the Gallatin M.A. program in Spring 2013 or earlier. It will be offered for the last time in Fall 2014. For more details, please see the information about degree requirements on the Gallatin Web site.

Notes

Course meets one time only on Wednesday, May 28.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2718 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Community: Approaches to the Concept

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
David Moore

Syllabus

Description

Students in this seminar investigate ‘community’ from a variety of theoretical and disciplinary approaches: sociology, psychology, anthropology, history, philosophy. They explore different ways community can be conceived and formed: as locality, as interest group, as action, as discourse. On one level, the course is designed for students specifically engaged in either or both analyzing and building community; on another level, it uses ‘community’ as just one example of a complex concept in the social domain, and samples the variety of ways different kinds of scholars have tried to study and theorize it. In the latter sense, the course is appropriate even for students focused on problems other than community, because it introduces them to the practice of interdisciplinary inquiry in the broad realm of social phenomena. It encourages them to grapple with the methodological differences among such broad paradigms as positivism, interpretivism, and poststructuralism, and to try out ideas and methods from each. Readings may include works by such authors as Elijah Anderson, Vered Amit, Anthony Cohen, Gerard Delanty, John Jackson, and Miranda Joseph.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (david.moore@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2546 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Writing Fiction in the Digital Age

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Lara Vapnyar

Syllabus

Description

The main goal of this course is to provide students with ways how to enhance traditional storytelling by new technologies without diminishing the role of the written word. We will examine every aspect of the craft of traditional fiction writing: plot, structure, point of view, narrative voice, dialogue, building of individual scenes, etc as well as the new techniques of the digital age: hypertext, visual and audio images, social media. We will learn how to balance the traditional with the new without overwhelming the written text with gadgets. The class will become a creative lab studying ideas by others, coming up with their own, presenting their fiction, responding to the writing of others, and discussing questions about literature, editing, and publishing in the digital age. Each student will create and present to class a work of fiction based on some of the ideas we will be discussing. The works don’t have to be in the electronic form, but the students will need to explain how they would work. Each student will create a basic website with a writer’s profile and portfolio of her works. Readings will include fiction by: Borges, Nabokov, Michael Joyce, Margaret Atwood, Jennifer Egan.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (Vapnyar@hotmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2544 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Fiction Inside Out

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Meera Nair

Syllabus

Description

In this fiction workshop, we will identify and practice the essential technical elements of fiction writing. We will look under the hood, take the back off the clock, peer into the innards, in order to study the formal decisions necessary for effective story-telling. Our inquiry will include point of entry; character and plot; creating meaningful scenes; interiority v/s external action; exposition; the management of time; the position of the narrator; linear v/s modular design; dialogue and its uses; conflict and resolution; image systems and so on. Fun exercises that encourage play, class readings, technique essays and student work will be points of departure for our enquiries into the internal workings of fiction. Readings may include Bausch, Gordon, Coetzee, Marcus, Mueenuddin Jin, Ngochi Adiche and craft essays by Baxter, Gass, Scoffield and Hrijbal among others.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (meerav3@gmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2027 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Proseminar: Theory and Methods in the Arts: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Meleko Mokgosi

Syllabus

Description

Theory and critique are not only expected from so-called "serious artists", they are also being produced and consumed at increasingly rapid rates by students, established artists, historians, critics, and others. This course will investigate the foundations and developments of art criticism and analysis. Emphasis will be placed on addressing what it means to be "critical" and how analysis has been influenced or shaped by critical theory, semiotics and psychoanalysis. The course will consider how these disciplines have been used in the writings and artworks by figures such as Nicolas Bourriaud, Julia Kristeva, Meyer Schapiro, Hans Haake, Mary Kelly, Dan Graham, and Andrea Fraser. In this instance artistic practice is viewed as involving both creating artworks and writing/theorizing. The course will stress the role of discourse in art while also allowing allowing practitioners to produce and present art projects.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units
Section 002
Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Rosalind Fredericks

Syllabus

Description

As the first step in the sequence leading to the thesis, the Thesis Proposal Seminar will move students toward the completion of an acceptable thesis proposal. Students learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate a plan that is both ambitious and practicable. Multiple sections of this course will be offered each semester for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit an advanced draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser.

Notes

Pass/fail only. The 2-unit course is taken after the student has completed a Proseminar and generally during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. Section 1 is for students who intend to complete a thesis in the arts and humanities; section II is for students in the social sciences. Please note that, throughout the semester, both sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, September 2nd.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Karen Hornick

Syllabus

Description

As the first step in the sequence leading to the thesis, the Thesis Proposal Seminar will move students toward the completion of an acceptable thesis proposal. Students learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate a plan that is both ambitious and practicable. Multiple sections of this course will be offered each semester for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit an advanced draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser.

Notes

Pass/fail only. The 2-unit course is taken after the student has completed a Proseminar and generally during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. Section 1 is for students who intend to complete a thesis in the arts and humanities; section II is for students in the social sciences. Please note that, throughout the semester, both sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, September 2nd.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin’s private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail Only. Deadline for submitting proposal is September 8. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City’s many social institutions in the arts, media, government, business, nonprofit or community action sectors. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them to explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory, as well to pursue career options. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work anywhere from 8 to 24 hours each week; for each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is September 8. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students are required to attend two workshops. Workshop I: Sept. 9, 12:30pm-1:30pm; Workshop II: Oct.7, 12:30pm-1:30pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

ELEC-GG2710 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Theorizing Practices: Underground Archives

4 units Mon
4:55 PM - 7:35 PM
Jack Tchen

Syllabus

Description

This is an intensive research seminar “decolonizing” knowledge and building on the students' own subaltern archival work, with the goal of producing publishable essays. As part of the "hidden" organizing work of groups excluded and marginalized from dominant normalizing political cultures, collectors and their collections are a foundational yet largely unrecognized group of cultural activists. This course will examine our own subject positions and our gleanings, visit collectors and their collections, and examine critical writings related to collecting, making presence, and the political culture of knowledge-making. Agnes Varda’s documentaries The Gleaners and I and Two Years Later will serve as a starting point for the class. Readings will likely include: essays by James Hevia, Dominick LaCapra, Bruno Latour, and Ann Stoler; and selections from: Ann Cvetkovich, An Archive of Feelings , Jacques Derrida, Archive Fever , Richards, The Imperial Archive , Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Decolonizing Methodologies , and Diana Taylor, The Archive and the Repertoire .

Notes

Same as AMST-GA 2304 001. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (jack.tchen@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2026 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Proseminar: Theory and Methods in the Humanities: Traditions of Interpretation

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Andrew Romig

Description

This interdisciplinary seminar for incoming M.A. students introduces a series of key twentieth and twenty-first century theoretical debates about the subject and object of interpretation in the modern humanities. The course begins with discussions concerning author, text, and context that took place within the British and American literary circles of the 1940s, ’50s, and ’60s – clashes over the origin and location of meaning that challenged the ways in which artists and critics had traditionally conceived of their work. These debates led to broad reevaluations – sometimes quite radical – of the interpretive act itself within both the academic and public spheres. The course continues with close analysis of the so-called “Linguistic Turn” of the 1970s and early ’80s, which both reflected and fomented broader shifts and revolutions of thought within the contemporary western world. The final weeks of the semester culminate with an exploration of critical interpretive trends today: theories of culture, narrative, memory, representation, power, disciplinarity, and interdisciplinarity. Students will emerge from the course with a stronger historical grasp of the interpretive theory of the past century, and will be challenged to use the course’s introductory framework to identify and to develop further the theoretical underpinnings of their own individual graduate work. Readings will be applicable to all humanities fields and shall include cultural critics such as Bhabha, Butler, and Fish, as well as more philosophical voices such as Barthes, Derrida, Spivak, and Zizek. Guest appearances by Gallatin faculty will facilitate a broad interdisciplinary discussion of not only the theory, but its application in research and practice.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335, are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include “Creating a Magazine,” “Dante’s Literary and Historical Background,” and “Environmental Design.” Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is May 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student’s work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is September 8. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

ELEC-GG2765 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

The Politics and Anti-Politics of NGOs

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Gianpaolo Baiocchi

Description

Over the last two decades Non-Governmental Organizations, or NGOs, have played an increasingly active and visible role in international aid, disaster relief, development, post-conflict rebuilding, and local governance. They have received increasing amounts of aid and development dollars, in many cases supplanting more traditional actors, like governments. They have thus provided fodder for exciting and contentious academic and public debates marked by extreme positions: Are NGOs the solution to some of the world’s most difficult problems, or are they trojan horses for neoliberal reforms? Do they represent a form of global civil society, or simply a circulation of elites? This course steps back and offers a broader perspective, by introducing students to the critical analysis of non-governmental organizations and their role in shaping global institutions and domestic political and social change. It locates NGOs within the web of transnational assemblages that they operate in, and pays attention to the experiences and practices of “local” populations that fall in and out of the category of “client.” We draw from a range of literatures to inform our analysis: democratic theory around citizenship and civil society; theories of the state; critical studies of development; and analyses of social movements, institutions and global networks. We focus on a few emblematic cases of transnational NGOs and their consequences, including Human Rights, Fair Trade, and alter-globalization NGOs.

Notes

Same as SOC-GA 3442. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (gb97@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, January 31. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include "Creating a Magazine," "Dante's Literary and Historical Background," and "Environmental Design." Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is December 2. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2335 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Master's Thesis and Defense

3 units Mon
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Karen Hornick

Description

Students registering for this course meet in the beginning of the semester with the thesis reviewer to discuss the procedures for organizing and presenting the thesis. It then becomes an independent project with the student’s adviser to complete the thesis. Students are required to register for Thesis and Defense when they have completed 37 credits in the M.A. program. Master’s Thesis and Defense is a required graduate core course for students who started the Gallatin M.A. program in Spring 2013 or earlier. It will be offered for the last time in Fall 2014. For more details, please see the information about degree requirements on the Gallatin Web site.

Notes

Course meets one time only on Monday, February 3. To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2115 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Review of the Literature

3 units

Description

Before starting the thesis, students are required to conduct an independent study—usually with their adviser—in which they find, read and critique a substantial body of scholarship related to the thesis. The purpose of this independent study is to ensure that the student is familiar with the previous scholarly work that forms a context for the thesis. The required work for Review of the Literature is a critical essay and a bibliography. The aim of the essay is to identify the categories of pertinent studies; report on major concepts, theories, debates, trends, and gaps in the field; and place the thesis topic in relation to earlier studies. The adviser sets the length of the paper, but it is typically more than 25 pages. Review of the Literature is a required graduate core course for students who started the Gallatin M.A. program in Spring 2013 or earlier. It will be offered for the last time in Spring 2014. For more details, please see the information about degree requirements on the Gallatin Web site.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, January 31. To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

PERF-GT2311 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Demi-Mondes and Dance Worlds

4 units Mon
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Julie Malnig

Description

Worlds of social dance often find their genesis among artists, rebels, non-conformists, and others who are deliberately or accidently marginal to mainstream capitalist culture. From the bordellos of Buenos Aires, where tango was born, to the honky-tonks of Nashville, to the jazz clubs of New Orleans and New York, to say nothing of contemporary raves, social dance’s roots may be found in transgressive behavior. Dancers in these scenes are often referred to as obsessed, addicted, and out of control. But whose control? In this course we examine the relation of the moving body to music and transgression, analyzing the way aesthetic styles create demimondes and subcultures that transform gender relations and public affect writ large. Beginning with theories of the aesthetic that explain the power of the body in cultural expression, we move on to examine dance worlds in their historical and ethnographic context, paying close attention to the politics of the body and its influence on changing parameters of social permissibility. We will also explore dancers’ efforts to test behaviors and assert identities outside the confines of the ordered, everyday world and consider what qualities are lost or gained when these dances become adopted for mainstream consumption. We will read works by Pierre Bordieu, Marcel Mauss, Jacques Ranciere, Jose Munoz, Jane Desmond, Sarah Thornton, Fiona Buckland, Robert Farris Thompson, Julie Taylor, Juliet McMains, Frances Aparicio, Marta Savigliano, Barbara Browning, and Tricia Rose, among others.

Notes

This Tisch graduate course is team-taught by Prof. Deborah Kapchan (from Tisch) and Prof. Julie Malnig (from Gallatin).

Type

NYU Courses (PERF-GT)

ELEC-GG2542 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Telling the Truth

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Scott Korb

Syllabus

Description

The slipperiness of nonfiction writing—ostensibly telling the truth in print—has, in recent years, been the subject of some handwringing in the world of writing and publishing. Jonah Lehrer made up Bob Dylan quotes? David Foster Wallace was a fabricator? Jane Goodall plagiarized? John D’Agata failed a fact-check (and then wrote a book with his fact-checker)? These are extreme examples of problems all nonfiction writers face. This nonfiction workshop asks students to try telling the truth in various forms throughout the semester, from memoir to personal essay to literary journalism. All the while, the animating questions will be what it means to tell the truth in these forms and why—or if—telling the truth matters, and whether it is even possible. Is all nonfiction the same? Is any of it ethical? Is, as Janet Malcolm says, the work of a journalist “morally indefensible?” Weekly workshops will engage ideas from readings by Joan Didion, John McPhee, Janet Malcolm, James Baldwin, John Jeremiah Sullivan, James Agee, Katherine Boo, among others.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (smkorb@gmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2735 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

War, Law and Memory

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Vasuki Nesiah

Syllabus

Description

From Antigone to the Nuremberg trials, there have been many efforts to grapple with the demands of law and the persistence of memory in the aftermath of war. This class will study trials, truth commissions, reparation programs, memorials and literary interventions that seek to engage with this challenge. This class examines the enabling conditions and (intended and unintended) consequences of the turn to transitional justice in international human rights. Reading some of the most important critical interventions of the last decade, the class will collectively analyze how different approaches to dealing with the legacies of war negotiate, challenge or legitimize different actors, institutions and alternative imaginings of 'justice.' The course is open to graduate students; advanced undergraduates are permitted with the permission of the instructor. There is a lot of reading for the course (10 books)—virtually a book a week for most weeks—so those interested should be able to manage that reading load. This is not a survey course that provides an overview of transitional justice norms, laws and institutions. Rather, it seeks to analyze the transitional justice field through engagements with theorists from multiple disciplines, including international law, political theory, history and anthropology. Readings include Sophocles, Hannah Arendt, Judith Butler, Kamari Clark, Ruti Teitel, Rosalind Shaw and others.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (vn10@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units
Section 002
Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Ritty Lukose

Description

As the first step in the sequence leading to the thesis, the Thesis Proposal Seminar will move students toward the completion of an acceptable thesis proposal. Students learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate a plan that is both ambitious and practicable. Multiple sections of this course will be offered each semester for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit an advanced draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser.

Notes

The 2-unit THESIS PROPOSAL SEMINAR replaces the 4-unit MASTER'S THESIS SEMINAR, effective Spring 2014. This course is taken after the student has completed a Proseminar and generally during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. Pass/fail only. Section 2 is for students who intend to complete a thesis drawing largely from research in the fields of the social sciences. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 28th, in which all sections meet at 1 Washington Place, Room 527.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Karen Hornick

Description

As the first step in the sequence leading to the thesis, the Thesis Proposal Seminar will move students toward the completion of an acceptable thesis proposal. Students learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate a plan that is both ambitious and practicable. Multiple sections of this course will be offered each semester for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit an advanced draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser.

Notes

The 2-unit THESIS PROPOSAL SEMINAR replaces the 4-unit MASTER'S THESIS SEMINAR, effective Spring 2014. This course is taken after the student has completed a Proseminar and generally during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. Pass/fail only. Section 1 is for students who intend to complete a thesis drawing largely from research in the fields of the humanities. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 28th, in which all sections meet at 1 Washington Place, Room 527.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units
Section 003
Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Bella Mirabella

Description

As the first step in the sequence leading to the thesis, the Thesis Proposal Seminar will move students toward the completion of an acceptable thesis proposal. Students learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate a plan that is both ambitious and practicable. Multiple sections of this course will be offered each semester for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit an advanced draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser.

Notes

The 2-unit THESIS PROPOSAL SEMINAR replaces the 4-unit MASTER'S THESIS SEMINAR, effective Spring 2014. This course is taken after the student has completed a Proseminar and generally during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. Pass/fail only. Section 3 is for students who intend to complete an artistic thesis. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 28th, in which all sections meet at 1 Washington Place, Room 527.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions in the arts, media, government, business, non-profit or community action sectors. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them to explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory, as well to pursue career options. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work anywhere from 8 to 24 hours each week; for each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, January 31. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students registering for an Internship are required to attend two workshops: Workshop I: Tuesday, February 4th, 12:30pm-1:45pm; Workshop II: Tuesday, March 4th, 12:30pm-1:45pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2335 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Master's Thesis and Defense

3 units Thu
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Karen Hornick

Description

Students registering for this course meet in the beginning of the semester with an M.A. program director to discuss the procedures for organizing and presenting the thesis. It then becomes an independent project with the student’s adviser to complete the thesis. Students are required to register for Thesis and Defense when they have completed 37 credits in the M.A. program. This course is required for students who started the program in Spring 2013 and earlier.

Notes

Pass/fail only. Course meets one time only on Thursday, September 4. To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2025 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Proseminar: Theory and Methods in the Social Sciences: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Stephen Duncombe

Syllabus

Description

This seminar, designed for incoming M.A. students, provides a broad introduction to theories and methods that have shaped the interdisciplinary terrain of the social sciences. The course emphasizes the reading of classic and more contemporary works of social theory and methodology, with a focus on key concepts and thinkers. How does one define a society? What is culture? How have social and cultural processes been understood? What is the relationship between a society or culture and a social group, an institution, or an individual? What is the nature of power, difference and identity? How do such foundational questions generate theories of modernity, capitalism, nationalism and globalization? How do such foundational questions orient the variety of disciplines within the social sciences? The course also surveys qualitative and quantitative methodologies, exploring the relationship between theory, methods, and the broader goals of research within the social sciences. Empirically grounded writings will explore the links between research frameworks, methodologies, data collection and theoretical claims. Readings will include classic texts by Karl Marx and Max Weber and more contemporary theorists such as Michel Foucault, David Harvey and Judith Butler, among others. Guest lectures by Gallatin faculty will introduce students to a range of methodologies (ethnography, quantitative data sets, the case study method, documentary analysis, interviewing and survey methods) and interdisciplinary research frameworks.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2830 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

Thinking with Tragedy: Ancient Genres and Their Influences

4 units Wed
5:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Susanne Wofford, Laura Slatkin

Syllabus

Description

This course will explore the nature and influence of the Greek tragic theater in generating theatrical forms that enabled writers in later periods to dramatize tragedy’s central philosophical and theoretical questions, and to theorize drama itself. Athenian State Theater developed a dramatic form -- tragedy -- that paid its dues both to epic and to ritual, and formalized a space for exploring the complex relations of kinship, eros, gender, the polis, thought and desire. This course grounds itself in ancient Greek tragedy and pursues its afterlives and aftershocks in the early modern and modern periods, in drama, philosophy, and film. Tragedy was never without its others—its accompanying satyr play, comedy, philosophy: Euripides in particular is among the most influential explorers and exploders of the genre, and the course will take a special look at his role in shaping early modern ideas of tragedy and tragicomedy. Throughout we will attend to historical situation, rhetorical resources, genre as category, and questions of the mediation of the tragic in later periods. As a space for our own speculations about the intersections of theory and drama, the course will include readings from Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, Shakespeare, Racine and Beckett, and will give some attention to modern film interpretations of works by these playwrights, including Pasolini’s Medea , Kozintsev’s King Lear , and Kurosawa’s Ran ; theoretical readings will include Aristotle, Hegel, Nietzsche, Vernant, and Butler. The idea of “Thinking with Tragedy” is to build in a space for uncovering the exfoliations of tragedy into other genres and forms, and for speculation on the generative power of tragedy for aesthetic theory.

Notes

Same as COLIT-GA 2821 and POET-GA 2001. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (laura.slatkin@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335, are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2581 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Adaptation: Screenplays and Source Material

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Selma Thompson

Description

How does a story change when re-imagined for a new medium? Why are some film adaptations more successful than others? What is the screenwriter's responsibility to the work being adapted and to its author? Should one always strive to be "true" to the source? How do screenwriters contend with elements of prose such as first-person narrative, point-of-view, authorial voice, and non-linear time? We will examine novels, short stories, memoirs, graphic novels—and the screenplays they inspired—from a screenwriter's perspective, as we consider various adaptation strategies. We also analyze the writing choices behind what might be called "faux adaptations"—original screenplays written as if they were adaptations. A guest speaker from Volunteer Lawyers For The Arts will explain how to correctly secure rights to underlying material. Students keep a journal, part of which may include, with instructor's approval, a short film screenplay adaptation, if the student holds the necessary rights.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (st35@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2018 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Proseminar: Popular Objects/Popular Subjects

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Karen Hornick

Syllabus

Description

Historical and technological developments have changed the way we think about cultural consumption. Is the mass audience itself a product of the goods and entertainment it consumes (as midcentury ideology theorists believed) or is it an outmoded concept lost in the wake of globalization, the sharp focusing techniques of digital marketing, crowd sourcing, and participatory culture? What are the implications of these developments for aesthetic appreciation, the formation of pleasure and desire, the relationship between culture and politics? Where do we ourselves stand as critics, scholars, and artists in relation to such questions? This proseminar attempts to reach students with interests, practical or theoretical, in one or more of the following fields: media studies, literary and art criticism, history, sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, and philosophy (particularly aesthetics). Among the topics to be discussed are: the history of asserted differences between high and low art; the mass reproduction and commodification of art; critical judgement and the differences between fans and experts. Class readings will include a mix of major theoretical writings, histories, and a variety of primary materials including literary texts, films, and performances. Authors may include Charles Baudelaire, Willa Cather, Walter Benjamin, Dwight Macdonald, Linda Williams, Henry Jenkins, and Carl Wilson.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean's Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student's work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, January 31. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2024 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

Proseminar: Everyday Life

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
David Moore

Description

Nothing is more taken-for-granted than everyday life: dinner-table conversations, workplace activities, shopping-mall transactions, sidewalk encounters. And yet each situation is shaped by a complex intersection of social forces, individual personalities, moment-to-moment decisions, cultural memes, and institutional histories. This course, designed for MA students in the social sciences and professions, will introduce them to a variety of ways of understanding and analyzing these sorts of quotidian experiences. We will examine talk and non-verbal behavior as they inform activities and relationships; we will look at the ways practical intelligence operates in different situations; we will track cultural differences in everyday behavior. We will consider the ways in which larger social structures and processes – class, race, gender, and so on – are produced, performed, and changed in the course of everyday life, as well as the ways they shape people’s actions and thoughts. Along the way, we will tackle such issues as human agency vs. structural determinism; the processes of social change; and the construction of identity, self, and nation. While the immediate purpose of the course is to unpack the dynamics of everyday life, the larger goal is to consider several broad approaches to social theory and research: the positivist, the interpretivist, and the poststructuralist. These explorations will give students an opportunity to try out various perspectives on their own studies and professional work, and may move them toward clearer conceptions of their theses. Readings may include sections from Karp et al.’s Sociology in Everyday Life ; Rogoff and Lave’s Everyday Cognition ; Geertz’s The Interpretation of Cultures ; Erickson’s Talk and Social Theory , and de Certeau’s The Practice of Everyday Life .

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2225 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Master's Thesis Seminar

4 units
Section 002
Mon
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Rosalind Fredericks

Description

This course engages students in the conceptual and technical processes leading to a thesis: articulating a core problem, reviewing appropriate literatures, designing effective methods, and constructing persuasive analyses. Through discussions of both published research articles and student work, the seminar examines the conventions of scholarly discourse, strategies of analysis and argumentation, and the ways in which writing can serve as a means to discover ideas. Students also learn academic writing skills; the conventions of scholarly discourse; strategies for building arguments; and the use of writing to explore ideas. Sections of the course focus on different thesis formats (research, artistic, project), but all take the student to the stage of preparing a thesis proposal.

Notes

Pass/fail only. Sec. 2 for the research or project thesis.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2225 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Master's Thesis Seminar

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Bella Mirabella

Description

This course engages students in the conceptual and technical processes leading to a thesis: articulating a core problem, reviewing appropriate literatures, designing effective methods, and constructing persuasive analyses. Through discussions of both published research articles and student work, the seminar examines the conventions of scholarly discourse, strategies of analysis and argumentation, and the ways in which writing can serve as a means to discover ideas. Students also learn academic writing skills; the conventions of scholarly discourse; strategies for building arguments; and the use of writing to explore ideas. Sections of the course focus on different thesis formats (research, artistic, project), but all take the student to the stage of preparing a thesis proposal.

Notes

Pass/fail only. Sec. 1 for the artistic thesis.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2115 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Review of the Literature

3 units

Description

Before starting the thesis, students are required to conduct an independent study—usually with their adviser— in which they find, read and critique a substantial body of scholarship related to the thesis. The purpose of this independent study is to ensure that the student is familiar with the previous scholarly work that forms a context for the thesis. The required work for Review of the Literature is a critical essay and a bibliography. The aim of the essay is to identify the categories of pertinent studies; report on major concepts, theories, debates, trends, and gaps in the field; and place the thesis topic in relation to earlier studies. The adviser sets the length of the paper, but it is typically more than 25 pages. Students may take Review of the Literature before the Master's Thesis Seminar as a way of exploring the broad literatures in the student's field or topic and to use the study as a way of generating a researchable question for the thesis. It is also possible to take Review of the Literature simultaneously with the Master's Thesis Seminar when the student is fairly clear about the research question, but may need some background development and can use Review of the Literature as a way of deepening knowledge in the specific domain of the thesis. A student may also take Review of the Literature after the Master's Thesis Seminar when he or she already has a well-developed research question and wants to dig deeply into the specific literatures related to that question. For more details about Review of the Literature, please visit Gallatin's website.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, February 1. To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2548 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Storytelling: Writing Techniques for Fiction and Nonfiction

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Christopher Bram

Syllabus

Description

Whether you are writing fiction or nonfiction, story is an important part of prose. Story here is just another name for sequence and structure. Learning the right order for your sentences, paragraphs, and pages is as invaluable as learning how to put one foot in front of the other when learning to walk. In this course we will explore different ways to lay out actions and ideas, whether you're writing a novel, a book of history, an opinion piece, an essay or a short story. We will examine the best ways to make notes and sketch out early drafts as you find your voice and structure. You will gain practice in rewriting. And we will look at some of the different approaches to voice and narrative, reading such writers as Milan Kundera, Janet Malcolm, Truman Capote, Sigrid Nunez, and Primo Levi. Students will be expected to submit for workshop two separate projects, one work of fiction and another of nonfiction, in at least two drafts each, which we will discuss in class. In the end you are expected to produce a minimum of forty finished pages.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (chris.bram@yahoo.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2755 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Contemporary Everyday Life in Iran

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Ali Mirsepassi

Syllabus

Description

This course will explore social and cultural theories and practices of everyday life. We will study various theoretical approaches to the understanding of everyday realities and focus on Iran as a contemporary case study. Theories of everyday life focus on the elusive character of our reality called "everydayness," the commonplace, ordinary, familiar and generally taken-for-granted world. What are the social and cultural elements that constitute life as ordinary reality? Study of everyday life is a highly powerful representation of how physical public space can be infused with the full richness and ambiguity of the imaginary—in a material context where the future path of a society is being decided through people’s ‘innocuous’ everyday actions (gathering to drink tea or coffee, playing music, or going shopping). A ‘lifestyle’ expresses a political allegiance, however murkily and grainily understood. It is ‘below’ the level of rational discourse, in imaginatively infused habitus. We will particularly focus on the variety of everyday practices in post-revolutionary Iran under the Islamic Republic. The class starts with a brief section on the social and cultural history of modern Iran and studies important scholarly works on the Iranian Revolution of 1979. We will also examine the social and cultural changes taking place in Iran over the past three decades. Most of the course will focus on various forms of everyday life practices in Iran. Some areas of everyday life we will examine are: consumption and life style; youth and underground culture; love and sexual experiences; public and private sphere; new and old religiosity; leisure time and secularization of time; and war as an ideological practice.

Notes

Same as NEST-GA 2785. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (am128@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ELEC-GG2730 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Causes Beyond Borders: Human Rights Activism and Global Governance

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Vasuki Nesiah

Syllabus

Description

One of the most distinctive dimensions of contemporary globalization has been the flourishing of transnational activism. Causes, organizations and activist networks have crossed borders alongside capital, goods and labor to reshape the terrain of political engagement. This class examines the enabling conditions and (intended and unintended) consequences of this turn to transnational activism in relation to other dimensions of contemporary global governance. The course will focus on human rights initiatives, including international non-governmental organizations such as Amnesty International and transnational campaigns such as ‘Save Darfur’. Reading important critical interventions of the last decade, the class will collectively analyze how different approaches mobilize and challenge different actors, causes and alternative imaginings of 'the global'. The course is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Readings are likely to draw from Sydney Tarrow, Clifford Bob, Daniel Bell, Kathryin Sikkink, Sally Merry, Stephen Hopgood, Mahmoud Mamdani, Kamari Clark, Wendy Hesford and Valerie Sperling.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (vn10@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2015 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Proseminar: Community Studies and Action

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 8:20 PM
David Moore

Syllabus

Description

This proseminar is designed for students interested broadly in social theory and practice, or more narrowly in community studies and/or community-based action, whether in the social services, education, the media, urban planning, grassroots organizing or political movements. It introduces them to interdisciplinary inquiry and action by using ‘community’ as an example of a complex idea in the social domain: exploring its varied meanings and manifestations from the perspectives of different kinds of theorists—sociologists, psychologists, anthropologists and historians, for example—and examining the ways different kinds of activists and professionals attempt to shape it. Readings, discussions and projects will engage students in understanding some of the dominant paradigms in social thought and approaches to social action. They will also be encouraged to apply these modes of inquiry and practice to their own goals and plans for the graduate program.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include "Creating a Magazine," "Dante's Literary and Historical Background," and "Environmental Design." Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is December 3. To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2018 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Proseminar: Popular Objects/Popular Subjects

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 8:20 PM
Karen Hornick

Syllabus

Description

Historical and technological developments in media have changed the way we think about popular audiences—are they products or producers of culture? Is an audience a mass of subjects, or is it comprised of individuals who freely express personal tastes? This proseminar attempts to reach students with interests, practical or theoretical, in one or more of the following fields: media studies, literary and art criticism, history, sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, and philosophy (particularly aesthetics). Our gaze will most often fall upon objects and events generated for transmission via mass media, but we will also consider other phenomena (as studied and documented, for example, in legal studies, ethnography, or star studies). Particular questions may concern such themes as: the difference between high and low art; the intersection of culture and politics; the globalization of culture, art as commodity and mass object; the value of fan studies and Henry Jenkins’s concept of “participatory culture”; and the place of desire, pleasure, and the perception of beauty in mass-produced or popular culture. Major class readings may include classic arguments by Max Weber, Karl Mannheim, Theodor Adorno, Raymond Williams, Stuart Hall, Pierre Bourdieu, Roland Barthes, Michel de Certeau, Michel Foucault, and Edward Said.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions in the arts, media, government, business, non-profit or community action sectors. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them to explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory, as well to pursue career options. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work anywhere from 8 to 24 hours each week; for each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, February 1. To register, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students registering for an Internship are required to attend one workshop: Monday, February 11 9:30am-10:30am or Tuesday, February 12; 12:30pm-1:30pm AND Monday, March 4 9:30am-10:30am or Tuesday, March 5, 12:30pm-1:30pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, February 1. To register, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

CORE-GG2023 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2013

Proseminar: Works-In-Progress: Criticism and The Creative Process

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Matthew Gregory

Description

Historically, criticism has evoked in the artist a myriad of reactions from antagonism to apathy and everything between. Yet despite the inherent vulnerability that comes with having one's work criticized, it is possible to constructively engage with and learn from criticism. This proseminar is designed for students interested in the visual, literary or performing arts. It is primarily intended for practicing artist/scholars who wish to explore how criticism may productively influence their creative process as well as understand their artwork and the role of criticism in a broader historical and theoretical context. In this class we will survey a range of readings that reveal issues about the history and changing purposes of criticism. Central to our exploration, however, is the requirement that each student create a piece of art (a screenplay, musical composition, painting, theatre performance, or other medium determined by the student’s concentration), which will receive criticism at various stages of development from a wide hierarchy of sources: peer, faculty, critics and experts in the field. Over the course of the semester, students will further develop their artwork in response to critique, while concurrently writing critically about their own work and work of their classmates. This iterative process of creation and criticism will provide an opportunity to deeply examine, through both theory and practice, the intersections between artist, audience, scholar and critic. Readings may include: John Berger’s Ways of Seeing ; Hans Hofmann’s Search for the Real ; George Bernard Shaw’s The Sanity of Art ; Tolstoy’s What is Art? ; Oscar Wilde’s The Critic as Artist ; Liz Lerman’s Critical Response ; Richard Schechner’s Between Theatre & Anthropology ; W.M. Shrum’s Fringe and Fortune: The Role of Critics in High and Popular Art .

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2340 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2013

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335, are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes