Skip Navigation

Courses

Filter By

Courses

Found 3405 courses
SASEM-UG9100 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

BERLIN: European Environmental Policy

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BERLIN. The course gives an introduction to various aspects of EU environmental policy making and policy implementation. After a brief recap of the basics of policy making in the EU, students will learn about the guiding principles and developments within EU environmental policy, the main actors and their interests in and influence on policy making. An optional part of the course might be a visit to the European House of the European Commission (EC) in Berlin where students either have the opportunity to role-play the decision-making process of the EC on the introduction of CO2-standards for cars or to engage in a debate with an EC representative. The second half of the course analyses EU environmental policies in different issue areas (e.g. climate change, biodiversity, waste) for their effectiveness in solving environmental problems. Different policy instruments are discussed for their merits and shortcomings (one example will be the EU Emissions Trading System) and linkages to other issue areas of EU policy making (e.g. industry and agriculture) are discussed. Finally, the course provides an international perspective on EU environmental policy making: sessions will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of EU environmental policy making at home and in international negotiations, compare it with US environmental politics, and discuss future challenges (e.g. EU enlargement) and trends for EU environmental governance.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1686 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2013

Self Fashioning in Literaure and Drama

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Jeanette Tran

Description

In 1980, literary critic Stephen Greenblatt coined the term “self-fashioning” to describe the 16th century phenomenon by which men in England developed an increasing self-consciousness about their ability to shape or “fashion” their identities. Anyone familiar with Shakespeare’s often quoted lines, “All the world’s a stage/ and all the men and women merely players,” has already received an introduction to this idea that identity is “fashion-able” or “performative.” Taking Greenblatt’s concept as a point of departure, this course explores identity and the concept of “self-fashioning” as it relates to performance. How does one fashion an identity, and how does knowledge of the theater inform our understanding of how identities are fashioned? What degree of autonomy does an individual have in fashioning his or her identity? How are our social, sexual, and racial identities mediated and shaped by our speech, our appearance, our institutions, and finally, our audiences? This course engages with both primary and secondary sources. Students examine early modern literature and drama alongside theories of performance from multiple disciplines. Authors include Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Castiglione, Pico della Mirandola, Erving Goffman, J.L Austin, and Judith Butler.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1661 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Total War, Terror and Critique

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
A.B. Huber

Description

There is currently a loud contest over what counts as terrorism, but there is also a quieter and wider crisis in our capacity to name and demarcate violence—the United States' and other's. It is no longer clear what counts as war, what constitutes a combatant, nor what kind of peace we might hope to make. What then can be said to confront, critique or rethink violence? We begin the seminar by familiarizing ourselves with the origins and logics of the Just War Theory (including Aristotle, Cicero, and Augustine) and we go on to consider the historical and philosophical contexts of Kant’s call for Perpetual Peace. But the seminar focuses primarily on critical theory’s engagement with the form and logics of modern warfare. Together we read work from the Frankfurt School in order to begin to reckon the relationship between politics, aesthetics, and violence. Finally, with the help of contemporary theorists (including Asad, Butler, Chow, Mamdani, Mahmood, Redfield) we turn toward questions of technology, terror, and the changing face of war in the twenty-first century. Can critique help us in anyway to abate violence or the anguish of its aftermath?

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1732 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Intermedia and Interdisciplinary Art Practices

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Meleko Mokgosi

Description

This seminar focuses on the development of interdisciplinary approaches in art practices from the 1960's to the present. Course material begins with Dick Higgins’ concept of ‘intermedia’, which was initially used to propose interdisciplinarity as the necessity of crossing genres, such as using painting, performance, video, film, poetry, and theatre as part of a viable artistic practice. By moving away from privileging one medium over another, this approach, which we explore, aimed at challenging notion of authenticity in art and erasing the boundary between producer and viewer as well as between linguistic and visual production. Consideration is then given to contemporary interdisciplinary methods. Course investigations are also framed by questions pertaining to the place of ethics and critical discourses in art; the shape and aesthetic that ‘critical’ art projects assume; as well as the relevance and limits of political and critical art projects in exhibition systems. In addition to reading texts from writers such as Amelia Jones, Hal Foster, Nicolas Bourriaud, Andrea Fraser, Liam Gillick, and Miwon Kwon, there will be visits to exhibitions within the city.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1031 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Scenic Design in the Performing Arts: Theatre, Dance, Film, and Television

4 units Mon
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Salvatore Tagliarino

Description

This course is an introduction to the principles and practice of theatrical scenic design. The vocabulary of visual imagery is woven into a history of theater, décor, and architecture and developed through the practice of graphic communication—the disciplines of drawing, painting and model building necessary for the expression of visual ideas in architecture, set, and lighting design. We explore how theatrical texts communicate in three-dimensional spaces and designs that respond to the author, director, and musical form (musical theater and opera). Students are expected to complete a series of scenic designs in models and two-dimensional presentations. Exercises integrate the principles of composition, value, color pattern, geometric form, and rhythm in the creation of three-dimensional shapes within a theatrical space—as in the sequence of acts or scenes in a drama. We deal in depth with the discipline of design skills, drafting and presentation craft as well as the reality of shop fabrication and load-in at the studio or theater. Although this is not a course in art direction for film and /or television, we discuss the differences in design for theater, film, and television.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1380 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

Three Revolutions: Haiti, Mexico, Cuba

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Antonio Lauria-Perricelli

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1380

Description

We compare and contrast the revolutionary events, processes and outcomes in Haiti, Mexico, and Cuba. None were simple reflexes of European or North American ideas and politics, although such external factors were among their causes and effects. Each had significant anti-colonial or anti-imperial components, as well as social and political conflicts and alliances within the immediate societies of the revolutionary countries which involved both "internal" and "external" groups and ideas. We consider the roles of such investors, landowners, mineowners, merchants, bankers, politicians, state administrators, peasants, laborers, intellectuals, migrants, and other social groups in-country or in the relevant imperial centers. We analyze interrelations among kinds of capitalism, and anti-capitalist ideologies or social forms and types of rationality; changing revolutionary processes and demands; changing role and organization of the state; the supporters or antagonists of the revolution among differing social groups at differing times; the revolution's relation to earlier and later movements. Where necessary, we invoke examples from other countries. Readings might include selections from Wolf, Peasant Wars of the Twentieth Century ; DuBois, Avengers of the New World ; Trouillot, Haiti: State Against Nation ; Sheller, various papers on gender, power and 19th century Haiti; Gonzales, The Mexican Revolution, 1910-1940 ; Olcott et al., Sex in Revolution: Gender, Politics, and Power in Modern Mexico ; Pérez Cuba, Between Reform and Revolution ; Kapcia, Cuba in Revolution: A History Since the Fifties ; Foran, Theories of Revolution , and later works.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CORE-GG2225 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Master's Thesis Seminar

4 units
Section 002
Mon
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Rosalind Fredericks

Description

This course engages students in the conceptual and technical processes leading to a thesis: articulating a core problem, reviewing appropriate literatures, designing effective methods, and constructing persuasive analyses. Through discussions of both published research articles and student work, the seminar examines the conventions of scholarly discourse, strategies of analysis and argumentation, and the ways in which writing can serve as a means to discover ideas. Students also learn academic writing skills; the conventions of scholarly discourse; strategies for building arguments; and the use of writing to explore ideas. Sections of the course focus on different thesis formats (research, artistic, project), but all take the student to the stage of preparing a thesis proposal.

Notes

Pass/fail only. Sec. 2 for the research or project thesis.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2225 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Master's Thesis Seminar

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Bella Mirabella

Description

This course engages students in the conceptual and technical processes leading to a thesis: articulating a core problem, reviewing appropriate literatures, designing effective methods, and constructing persuasive analyses. Through discussions of both published research articles and student work, the seminar examines the conventions of scholarly discourse, strategies of analysis and argumentation, and the ways in which writing can serve as a means to discover ideas. Students also learn academic writing skills; the conventions of scholarly discourse; strategies for building arguments; and the use of writing to explore ideas. Sections of the course focus on different thesis formats (research, artistic, project), but all take the student to the stage of preparing a thesis proposal.

Notes

Pass/fail only. Sec. 1 for the artistic thesis.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1589 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

The Vietnam War

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Hannah Gurman

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1589

Description

The Vietnam War occupies a special place in U.S history and foreign relations. For decades, it was known as America’s longest war, the only war the United States ever lost, a war that shattered Americans' faith in their government and spawned a culture of protests that divided one generation from another. More recently, it has become the conflict against which the U.S. wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya are most often compared and contrasted. In this course, we examine the history of the Vietnam War both in its own context and as part of ongoing debates about U.S. foreign policy and military interventions. In addition to considering the war from the U.S. perspective, we also read texts that offer insights into the Vietnamese experience. We cover a wide range of genres and disciplines, including: official documents written by Robert McNamara, George Ball, and Daniel Ellsberg; historical scholarship by Leslie Gelb, David Hunt, and Marilyn Young; and novels, films, and poetry of Eugene Burdick, Norman Mailer, Yusef Komunyaaka, and Tim O’Brien.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1719 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

China Gazing

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Chinnie Ding

Description

Ever since Marco Polo’s travels in the 13th century, China has provoked the Western imagination less as a place than a set of ideas—a cipher of difference and a test-case for universals. For thinkers from Leibniz to Sontag to Badiou, and in recent controversies around Ai Weiwei as much as FoxConn, determining how China and the Chinese are (or ought to be) like or unlike other states and cultures has sounded out essential questions about governance, human rights, civilizational progress, epistemology, and the bounds of fellow-feeling. Guided by the history of diplomatic, economic, and cultural exchanges between China and the Western world, this course is built around several key tropes that have persisted adaptively throughout that history, such as despotism and internationalism, the laboring body and the revolutionary masses. Our emphasis is on critical analysis of the political as well as the aesthetic imagination. Writing assignments consist of weekly response papers, a midterm essay, and a final research project. Readings span literature, history, political philosophy, critical theory, and travel writing. We also scrutinize several works of art, film, theatre, and performance.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1740 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Bridging Culture and Nature: An Introduction to Conservation Science

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Jim Tolisano

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1740

Description

This course brings together leading thinking from literature, anthropology, archeology, social psychology, economics, and biology to explore the art and science of applied conservation biology. The goal of conservation biology is to conserve the incredible diversity of life found on our planet, and, in the process, protect our rich cultural diversity, and ourselves. We discover how business entrepreneurs, social scientists, wildlife biologists, and artists all play an integral role in achieving practical conservation solutions. We begin with an exploration of our own relationship to the natural world. We examine what biological diversity is, the principal threats to biological systems, and specific actions that are being taken to reverse these threats and protect life on earth. We also explore the premise that managing the biological wealth of the planet really requires us to manage ourselves and the human cultures we have created. The fieldwork of the physical and biological sciences provide the foundation from which our work as conservation biologists proceeds. However, the applied work of the social sciences, education, business, humanities and arts then serve as the tools we need to manage ourselves and create a relationship with nature that is mutually supportive. Readings include reserved selections from textbooks, including Richard Primack’s Primer of Conservation Biology and Sarah Pilgrim’s Nature and Culture , along with others from popular non-fiction authors including Bill McKibben, Gary Snyder, Terry Tempest Williams and others. At the course conclusion students from all disciplines should see a role for themselves in the conservation work that is an essential part of our next century.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1628 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Think Big: Global Issues and Ecological Solutions

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Mitchell Joachim

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1628

Description

What are the most stimulating solutions to global climate change? If we were given an imaginary “client” with an unlimited budget and colossal power, what should we design? The resounding formula for green thinking is broadly interpreted in three meta-themes; apocalyptic, technological, and traditional. Each category promises solutions and/or interpretations of our current environmental calamity. We explore critical philosophical, artistic, and scientific positions in each meta-theme that help elucidate this dilemma. Students read, evaluate, and synthesize projects and texts from great minds such as; William Cronon, Bill McKibben, Bruce Mau, Mike Davis, Marshall McLuhan, Bjorn Lomborg, David Orr, Paul Virilio, Marshall Mclean , Laurence Buell, and others. The final project is the production of a mock Madison Avenue advertising campaign that promotes urban “sustainability.”

Notes

Open to sophomores only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG9450 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

SHANGHAI: Creative Writing

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-SHANGHAI. Shanghai is a city in radical flux, an historical East-West hybrid that is reinventing itself daily on an epic scale in the 21st century. Home now to some 18 million, counting the “floating population” of migrants, it is an easy place to “lose” oneself. Our exploration of Shanghai’s contemporary self-reinvention sets the scene for a visceral encounter with our rapidly changing world, selves, and places in it. If, like Shanghai, we reinvent ourselves in our season here—as writer, traveler, critic, perhaps even as cultural voyeur—what might we find? In this course, we will explore what it means to “lose” and then “find” oneself anew in this city—primarily as a writer, but also as a traveler from the West, an outsider inhabiting, and shifting among, different cultural identities. This investigation will bring us to look closely at Chinese and West¬ern writers’ works—fiction, creative nonfiction, travel writing, poetry, film and other genres—that use the city, and the experience of being “alien” or “other,” as a vital site of exploration of self, culture, identity and society.

Type

Global Programs (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1658 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Spies Like Us? Cold War Science as the Ultimate National Security Threat

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Jose Perillan

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1658

Description

On Friday June 19th, 1953 just before the sun set on Sing-Sing prison, Ethyl and Julius Rosenberg were executed by electrocution for their part in an espionage network that transferred classified information associated with top secret U.S. atomic research to the Soviet Union. This case was a landmark at the height of tensions associated with the second Red Scare of the 1940s and 50s, but the almost half-century of Cold War tensions, teetering on the brink of global annihilation, brought out the devastating threats of societal paranoia and political persecution. Throughout the Cold War period science was wielded by both the United States and the Soviet Union with alarming efficacy. As big science began to dominate international and domestic policy, the two superpowers played ‘chicken’ with an atomic arms race and ‘catch me if you can’ with a space race that seemed to fuel animosity and bring us ever closer to the brink of world catastrophe. In this seminar we use primary and secondary sources to examine the complex role of science during the Cold War, as weapon, threat, and salvation. Readings may include works by J.R. Oppenheimer, Deborah Cadbury, Albert Einstein, John Lewis Gaddis, John Earl Hayes, Harvey Klehr, and Jessica Wang among others.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG722 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Popular Religion and Popular Culture in North America

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Gregory Erickson

Syllabus

FIRST-UG722

Description

American religion, historian Nathan Hatch writes, has “less to do with the specifics of polity and governance and more with the incarnation of the church into popular culture.” Although Hatch was writing about the 19th century, this complex relationship between the popular and the liturgical continues to shape and define America today. In this course, we study and write about ways in which film, television, advertising, music, sports, politics, and the news media present, negotiate, and affect religious issues, and, conversely, how religion changes popular culture. We “read” primary texts of popular religion and popular culture, such as Billy Graham sermons, Mormon pageants, Madonna videos, baseball and video games, as well as theoretical works by Jean Baudrillard, Elaine Graham, Peter Williams, Kate McCarthy, Eric Mazur, Susan Mizruchi, Richard Santana and Gregory Erickson. Students are encouraged to explore topics of their own interest, and assignments include reaction papers, various essay forms, and individual research projects.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

GERM-UA240 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud

4 units
Section 002
Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

Description

This course examines the work of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three German authors who in different and decisive ways provided a radically new understanding of the notions of interpretation, history, the subject, politics, religion, and art. The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive engagement with and a dialogue between these three thinkers. The seminar underscores their prevailing actuality and thereby strives to delineate the origin of much modern thinking.

Type

CAS Course Sections Reserved for Gallatin Students (GERM-UA)

FIRST-UG746 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Fear and the Gothic

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Bridget McFarland

Description

Why do some stories scare us? This course seeks to define and examine fear by reading scary stories defined as gothic. The course begins with the birth of the "Gothic" novel in Great Britain and traces the genre's evolution during the revolutionary turmoil of the 1790s. In addition to reading the gothic as a response to a shifting political landscape, we consider the extent to which the gothic's ability to inspire fear and produce a sensory response relates to the goals of the Enlightenment. How does gothic literature test the limits of empiricism and question the authority of sensory experience? How and why do works of gothic literature succeed in creating fear? We read canonical works of the gothic, including drama, short stories, horror ballads, and a satirical send-up of the genre . Readings may include M.G. Lewis' The Monk and Castle Spectre, Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, Miles Peter Andrews' The Enchanted Castle, Edgar Allan Poe's The Fall of the House of Usher, Washington Irving's Legend of Sleepy Hollow and selected ballads such as "The Children in the Wood," "Tam Lin," and "Sweet William's Ghost."

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1342 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Language, Globalization and the Self

4 units Mon
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Maria-Luisa Achino-Loeb

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1342

Description

This course is intended as an exploration of language as vehicle for processes of globalization. What role did language play in the changes wrought by early capitalist transformations and the colonial expansion? Conversely, how have these global changes affected localized communities and the languages that identify them? And why should we care? To answer these questions we examine how the colonial experience has given rise to value-laden linguistic practices that mirror and sustain the racializing of privilege; and how the experience of language-loss encountered by voluntary and involuntary migrants can attack the integrity of the self. While ultimately concerned with language, our discussions have a wide scope ranging from issues of political economy to collective consciousness and individual psychology. Readings include Achino-Loeb's Silence: The Currency of Power , Anderson's Imagined Communities , Wolf's Europe and the People Without History , Hoffman's Lost in Translation , Dangarembga's Nervous Conditions , Richard Rodriguez’ Hunger of Memory as well as selected excerpts from other sources.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1011 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Voicing the Text

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Jessie Austrian

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1011

Description

In this class we study vocal and performance technique, as well as the art of rhetoric and its history. We put these two studies together to practice and investigate how to communicate thought and how to evoke pathos, understanding and action from our audiences. Students discuss, analyze and perform texts from classic and modern plays and poetry, as well as ancient and contemporary political texts. This course asks questions such as: What is the difference between text that is intended to be heard versus text which is intended to be read? How do the musical qualities of the voice (such as tone, timbre and inflection) affect the content and reception of the message? How does a performer give voice to a playwright's words? How do our vocal habits affect our ability to communicate clearly? How we can use our natural voices to their best and most profound effect?

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG727 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Sense and Consensus

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Chinnie Ding

Description

Blink. Sniff. Tickle. Eavesdrop. Slurp. We experience the world through our senses. To make sense of what we sense is to navigate between feeling and knowing, immediacy and otherness, idiosyncrasy and consensus. Whether deprivation or overload, sensory experience at once invites description and eludes understanding, challenging writers and scientists alike. This class explores the mechanics as well as the poetics of perception. Students develop individual research topics from diverse disciplines, such as literature, music, neuroscience, art, philosophy, and mysticism. Color, pain, synesthesia, umami, disgust, the sublime, phantom limbs, and "non-lethal" weaponry are some phenomena we look into. Readings may include works by Franz Kafka, Isadora Duncan, J.K. Huysmans, Gertrude Stein, Marcel Proust, Caroline Walker Bynum, Oliver Sacks, and Virginia Woolf. Films and excursions supplement the readings.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1718 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Hegel: Spirit, History and Forgiveness

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Justin Holt

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1718

Description

German Idealist thinker G.W.F. Hegel's views of historical and cultural change have been tremendously influential. Hegel asks us to consider: is there a logic to historical development? Can human knowledge ever be complete? Is a past of domination required for a future of freedom? Hegel raises these questions, and more, in The Phenomenology of Spirit . This course introduces students to this seminal work, exploring Hegel's ideas about the development of civilization, the nature of knowledge, the status of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution as projects of intellectual and political liberation, and the prospect of forgiveness for historical wrongs. We also look at some other works that draw on similar themes, such as Kant's Perpetual Peace and Sophocles' Antigone.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9102 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

BERLIN: Topics in German Cinema

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BERLIN. Course description coming soon.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

INDIV-UG1701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, February 1. To register, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1072 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Poets in Protest: Footsteps to Hip-Hop

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

This seminar examines the tradition of poetic protest in the African Diaspora. From the Harlem Renaissance and Négritude to the Black Liberation Movement of the 60's and today's Hip-Hop/Rap explosion, poets, lyricists and rap/hip-hop artists have sought to reclaim and reshape images of themselves and their communal experiences. Through comparative and critical analysis of historical works, songs, and poetry, we come to a deeper understanding of the common thematic and aesthetic approaches of these movements as they continue to alter the discourse on race and liberation. Texts may include Michael Richardson, ed., Refusal of the Shadow: Surrealism and the Caribbean ; David L. Lewis, ed., The Portable Harlem Renaissance Reader ; Tricia Rose, Black Noise ; films such as Euzhan Palcy, Sugar Cane Alley , and Tony Silver and Henry Chalfant, Style Wars ; and samples from Langston Hughes, NWA, Amiri Baraka, Nikki Giovanni, KRS-One, OutKast, Dead Prez, Public Enemy, and Tupac Shakur.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CORE-GG2115 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Review of the Literature

3 units

Description

Before starting the thesis, students are required to conduct an independent study—usually with their adviser— in which they find, read and critique a substantial body of scholarship related to the thesis. The purpose of this independent study is to ensure that the student is familiar with the previous scholarly work that forms a context for the thesis. The required work for Review of the Literature is a critical essay and a bibliography. The aim of the essay is to identify the categories of pertinent studies; report on major concepts, theories, debates, trends, and gaps in the field; and place the thesis topic in relation to earlier studies. The adviser sets the length of the paper, but it is typically more than 25 pages. Students may take Review of the Literature before the Master's Thesis Seminar as a way of exploring the broad literatures in the student's field or topic and to use the study as a way of generating a researchable question for the thesis. It is also possible to take Review of the Literature simultaneously with the Master's Thesis Seminar when the student is fairly clear about the research question, but may need some background development and can use Review of the Literature as a way of deepening knowledge in the specific domain of the thesis. A student may also take Review of the Literature after the Master's Thesis Seminar when he or she already has a well-developed research question and wants to dig deeply into the specific literatures related to that question. For more details about Review of the Literature, please visit Gallatin's website.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, February 1. To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1299 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Objectivity and the Politics of the Journalism Revolution

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Paul Thaler

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1299

Description

At the birth of this nation, it was assumed by journalists and their readers that journalists were partisans, telling stories from particular points of view. But the growth of the modern newspaper combined with the ideals of science transformed the image, self-image, and practice of journalism, which now claims to worship at the altar of objectivity, to present information or “news” without bias. This ethic has carried over to the contemporary media, despite challenges from critics. Rather than multiple media outlets presenting different optics or lenses through which to see events and their contexts, media outlets claim to speak impartially. In this course we examine this ideal or promise: is it possible? desirable? To pursue this inquiry we consider challenges to objectivity by figures such as Truman Capote, who linked a “new journalism” to a personal point of view, Robert McChesney, whose corporate media perspective provides a powerful macro analysis of modern journalism, and Jay Rosen, who articulates the postmodern shifts brought on by the Internet that have redefined and realigned the relationship between the journalist and audience. Readings include Walter Lippmann, John Dewey, Tom Wolfe, Michael Herr, Eric Alterman, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, and Ben Bagdikian.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Aesthetics in Context

4 units Tue Thu
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Christopher Trogan

Syllabus

FIRST-UG701

Description

What is beauty? Why is it so powerful? What attracts us to someone or something beautiful? Is beauty an objective feature of things, or is it determined by cultural context and personal preference? Although beauty inspired enormous attention from antiquity to the twentieth century, much of modern art, literature, and philosophy considered beauty insignificant and, in some cases, even reacted vehemently against it. This course recognizes the significance of beauty and its enormous influence on our lives. It approaches the issue through an examination of the way in which philosophers, artists, writers, psychologists, cultural historians, and biologists have understood the term. It also considers the intersection of beauty and politics. Texts may include works by Arthur Danto, Charles Baudelaire, Immanuel Kant, Thomas Mann, Plato, Nancy Etcoff, Susan Bordo, and other contemporary figures.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1059 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Disease and Civilization

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Gene Cittadino

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1059

Description

This course explores the cultural, social, scientific, and political dimensions of epidemic disease through an examination of selected episodes from plagues in antiquity to AIDS, Ebola, avian flu, and bioterrorism in our time. We approach the problem of understanding the role of disease in human history from two different, but interrelated, perspectives: an ecological perspective, making use of a combination of environmental, biological, and cultural factors to help explain the origin and spread of epidemics, and a cultural/social history perspective, emphasizing the interaction of cultural values, religious beliefs, scientific knowledge, medical practice, economics, and politics in shaping perceptions of the nature, causes, cures, and significance of various diseases. Readings range from Thucydides and the Hippocratic writings to Boccaccio, Defoe, and Orwell, including, where possible, nonwestern sources, along with a variety of recent works that discuss the historical, social, and biological aspects of epidemic disease in different cultural and geographical settings.

Notes

Section 3 for Environmental Studies majors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1493 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Sports, Race and Politics

4 units Wed
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Millery Polyné

Description

Beyond spectacular touchdowns and walk-off grand slams, sport remains a vital institution for analyzing the ideological/theoretical frameworks of nationalism, diplomacy, economic development, corruption, gender and race. From Joe Louis's historic fight against Max Schmeling in June 1936 to the role of FIFA's World Cup played in South Africa's structural development, sport should be understood beyond masculine bravado, violence and the joy and agony of competition, but also as a serious vehicle for conceptualizing and analyzing the triumphs and limitations of our society and its complicated history. This course examines sports (baseball, boxing, soccer, basketball and cricket), primarily from a U.S. and Latin American context, during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In what ways do these sports reify concepts of race and gender? How is it utilized as a tool of diplomatic relations? We read key articles and seminal books in the field of the sport studies that illuminate the significance of sport in shaping culture and politics in our global society.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9151 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

BUENOS AIRES: Myths, Icons, and Invented Traditions: A Cultural History of Latin America

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. Mitos, íconos y tradiciones inventadas is an advanced conversation course, which seeks to make students familiar with the rich and complex history of Latin America through the study of some of its most known and iconic cultural expressions. It does also work as an introductory map to the most influential and widespread approaches in Latin American social sciences, cultural studies and literary criticism. Thus, students will not only have a first encounter with key historical processes that lie behind some well know cultural icons, but also will be introduced to arguments and ways of writing that help constitute modern Latin American educated Spanish. The course will be structured in seven topics; each topic will be covered in two weeks. During these four classes, students will be exposed to different kinds of cultural materials, including literary texts, film, papers from several disciplines, theater plays, art shows and live concerts.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9352 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

PARIS: Topics in French Literature: Paris Modern Literature & Art

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PARIS. Course description coming soon.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

FIRST-UG745 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Thought Crimes: Criminal Intent in Law, Literature and Society

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Kathleen Smith

Syllabus

FIRST-UG745

Description

The concept of mens rea or criminal intent is a relatively new legal innovation, dating from the Middle Ages. Why did jurists and philosophers begin to recognize the mind, and specifically intent, as an important site of transgression? And how did this revolution in theories of morality shift the focus away from action in order to promote theories of innocence or guilt based on intent? By reading Augustine and Abelard as well as ancient legal codes, we study the origins of the creation of a moral self that was based on the mind, as opposed to observable actions. The poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer offers an important example of how writers of the period used the idea of individual intent to develop literary character and to represent human subjectivity. Medieval plays that represent the thought crimes of Satan also provide a platform for thinking about intention and religious or intellectual dissent. We also explore how studying the roots of these concepts can help us understand the modern world. We examine, for example, the related problems of just intent in just war theory from its medieval origins to its presence in current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. We read recent literary works by authors such as Junot Díaz and Alice Munro as a way to study intention as both a problematic and a defining element of culpability and the moral self. Finally, modern theories of intention and morality from philosophers and neuroscientists offer additional theoretical lenses for analyzing the semester’s readings. These topics form the basis for several short writing assignments and a major research paper.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1451 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2013

Ancient Reflections in a Time of Modern War

2 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Laura Slatkin

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1451

Description

In this class we explore ancient Greek attitudes toward war, as represented in epic, drama, and historiography. Among the topics we consider are: rhetoric and rationales for and against war; war and social cohesion; war and empire; the stakes of civil war; war and gender; the social costs of war; the implications for our contemporary situation. Readings may include, Homer, Iliad ; Sophocles, Ajax ; Aeschylus Seven Against Thebes ; Euripides, Iphigeneia in Aulis and Trojan Women ; Aristophanes, Peace ; Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War ; and twentieth century mediations on the problematic of war, such as Elaine Scarry, The Body in Pain ; Jonathan Shay, Achilles in Vietnam ; Simone Weil, The Iliad, or the poem of force .

Notes

Course meets 1/29- 3/12 only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1646 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

Fractured States: Border Crossings, Divisions, and Partitions

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Valerie Forman

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1646

Description

This course explores what happens when geographical spaces get divided and people are dislocated, forced to migrate, or become part of a new political entity. We focus on these geographical divisions both as larger political crises and as events that have effects at more personal and local levels, for example, on familial ties, the ability to find work, or to practice one's religion. We focus on a few regions whose borders have been and still are in crisis in different ways: Haiti and the Dominican Republic; India and Pakistan; and Israel and Palestine. Some specific questions we explore: In what ways do geographical borders participate in the creation of national, racial, or religious, identities? What happens to individuals or groups of people who live in a nation to which they do not feel a primary allegiance and to people who have multiple allegiances? In what ways do borders facilitate or demand the production of social difference? How do writers imagine the relationship of subjects to divided spaces and the relationship of those subjects to each other? How do fictional and historical works address the relationships between possibilities for peace and security and notions of justice? The class focuses primarily on literary texts and narrative films, which we place in dialogue with oral histories, personal memoir, and documentary films. Some likely authors we read in the course include: Edwige Danticat, Junot Díaz, Salman Rushdie, Sami Michael, and Ghassan Kanafani.

Notes

Same as COLIT-UA 800 001.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1734 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2013

Renaissance and Renewal in the 9th Century

2 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Andrew Romig

Description

The European Early Middle Ages may seem an unlikely place to find a renaissance. In our popular imagination, the era remains a foreign and backward place, a “Dark Age”: its systemic violence, its brutal social injustices, and its intellectual and artistic poverty. In fact, however, the Early Middle Ages of Europe was far more diverse and vibrant than our common narratives of the “brutish” medieval past suggest. In this course, we focus on the long 9th century, which saw a proliferation of scholarship and art under the patronage of Charlemagne and his heirs that in some ways harkened back to artistic world of imperial Rome. Carolingian courts became centers of learning, bringing the finest thinkers of Europe together in conversation, and recalling the aesthetics of the ancient world while also forging new styles and forms of scientific thought and artistic creation. Carolingian rulers engaged diplomatically with the world beyond—not just England and Scandinavia beyond the North Sea, but Muslim Spain and Baghdad, Jerusalem, and North Africa. In important ways, the Carolingian renaissance paved the way for the inventions and revolutions of the later Middle Ages and beyond. It thus provides a key early comparative example for the study of “renaissances” in all eras. No previous coursework required. Texts may include Einhard’s Life of Charlemagne , the “Coronation Gospels,” The Utrecht Psalter, the Heliand , and the Waltharius .

Notes

Course meets 1/28- 3/11 only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CLI-UG1466 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Policy, Community, and Self

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Eric Brettschneider

Syllabus

CLI-UG1466

Description

Intended to introduce policy, this course includes an internship at a policy and /or advocacy organization. Community building, service integration and child welfare are featured in readings, discussion, and internships. Through examples such as ethnic matching placements in foster care, zero tolerance approaches to drug abuse, or public financing of political campaigns, students come to understand how government, schools, gangs, religious institutions and families can, with varying degrees of explicitness and formality, all make policy. Students at the course conclusion are able to: identify policies within their lives; argue all sides of a policy question; appreciate the importance of evidence; and distinguish implementation from formulation. Readings include Bowling Alone , by Robert Putnam, and The Lost Children of Wilder , by Nina Bernstein. Students will be helped to connect meetings they attend and the policy concepts taught and discussed in class. The goal is to leave no student unaware of the importance of policy in their own and their community's life. The course focuses on policies that are empowering. Assignments include an internship journal.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

IDSEM-UG1720 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Artificial and the Natural

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Myles Jackson

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1720

Description

When we hear the story about molecular biologists inserting a gene responsible for luminosity taken from a lightning bug into a tobacco or strawberry plant, we tend to be repulsed, declaring that such a move is ‘unnatural.’ Yet when we see cows grazing on the Great Plains, or a beautiful array of flowers at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, we praise the beauty of nature. However, flowers and cattle are just as ‘artificial’ as the genetically modified tobacco or strawberry plant. After all, they are the products of centuries of breeding, artificially selecting for traits, which nature itself did not. Likewise, why should a chemical polymer or dye derived from a natural substance, such as carbon, be any more (or less) artificial than a genetically modified mouse programmed to succumb to cancer? Finally, why are we awestruck when we hear about IBM’s Big Blue defeating one of the greatest chess player of the century, Gary Kasparov, yet we are deeply concerned with and troubled by the attempts of scientists and engineers to devise computers, which may one day mimic human attributes, such as consciousness? The goal of this course is to study the debate in the West from Aristotle to the present and explore its socio-political, philosophical, economic and scientific ramifications. This course may be counted toward the science requirement. Readings include Aristotle’s Metaphysics and Meteorology , Essays by Grafton, Newman, and Bensaude-Vincent in The Natural and the Artificial ; Shapin, The Scientific Revolution , Riskin on automata, Goethe, N. Hawthorne, E. A. Poe, Freud, Turing, Fullwiley (race and genes) and Jackson (gene patenting).

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1027 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Performing the Self in Society

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Lenora Champagne

Description

This is a class in solo performance composition primarily for performers, dancers and for students interested in performance art and its histories. Participants develop a solo performance through a series of exercises using memory, movement and written and visual imagery, and explore the associative strategies of collage and pastiche as methodologies for structuring material. The solos emerge from a process involving improvisation (movement and text), composing, and revision of material. Readings include performance texts by prominent artists, essays on performance, and video viewings, which foreground the tendency in performance to explore subjectivity and identity in light of social and political critique. Required texts include Jo Bonney’s Extreme Exposure , C. Carr's On Edge: Performance at the End of the Twentieth Century, and Lenora Champagne’s Out from Under: Texts by Women Performance Artists . Additional readings include Colin Counsell, "Postmodernism and Performance Art," Roselee Goldberg, "Performance: A Hidden History," Jonathan Kalb, "Documentary Solo Performance: The Politics of the Mirrored Self," and an essay by Coco Fusco. Assignments include a solo performance created from the material developed in class (rather than "polishing" an already created piece), along with a written analysis of two live solo performances, and an oral presentation. Strategies learned in this class are also useful for composing group work.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

SASEM-UG9550 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
SP 2013

TEL AVIV: The Present Past: Archaeology and History of the Land of Israel and its Relevance for Today

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-TEL AVIV. The course examines the archaeological findings, the biblical text and ancient Near Eastern records in an attempt to reconstruct the history of ancient Israel in the first Millennium BCE. The study of ancient Israel in biblical times attracts the imagination of millions around the world. Biblical accounts on kings such as David and Solomon are at the heart of most cultures today and it is no wonder that pure academic debates about the historicity of these biblical accounts echoes into public realm. Can we use archaeology and biblical scholarship in order to reconstruct a better image of these decisive events? Five currently hotly debated subjects in biblical history will be discussed with the students in class meetings, in field trips and with the help of guest speakers who will present their side of the argument.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1212 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

World Dance

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Kathryn Posin

Description

Dance reflects cultural heritage and is a key to understanding diverse societies. In this arts workshop, students explore dance as it appears on several continents. Dance can be seen as encoded forms of a society's religious, artistic, political, economic, and familial values. Readings cover issues of globalization, fusion and authenticity. Migration, missionaries, trade routes and the diaspora have led to the creation of new dance forms like "Bollywood" and "Tribal" that are a synthesis of earlier forms. Students are introduced to different dance forms through selected readings, rich collection of video footage and studio practice often lead by various guest artists. After a brief warm-up, the class learns simple steps, floor plans and rhythms from the music and dance cultures being studied. Students choose a dance form as their project and themselves become researchers, performers and creators of new forms.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1116 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2013

Fate and Free Will in the Epic Tradition

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Antonio Rutigliano

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1116

Description

The role of the gods in human affairs inevitably raises the question of fate and free will. The epics, from the ancient world to the Renaissance, frequently reflect and define this debate. This course examines how the epics of Homer, Vergil, Dante and Milton not only mirror the philosophical and theological perceptions of the period, but sometimes forecast future debates on the issue. Readings may include the Epic of Gilgamesh, Iliad or Odyssey , Aeneid , and Divine Comedy , as well as selections from Plato's Protagoras or Aristotle's Ethics , Cicero's De Fato , Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy , and Fromm's Escape From Freedom .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1301 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Advanced Creative Nonfiction

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Cris Beam

Description

This is a course for students with some experience in reporting, researching and writing nonfiction, who want to experiment in literary, long-form journalism. Students choose a small culture or community on which to focus throughout the semester. We’ll start by writing one profile of a member of this community, developing interviewing skills, and learning about voice and point of view. We’ll also write a reflective piece on interrogating the ways we explore this community without exploiting, exoticizing or oversimplifying our sources. Then students move on to one major work of literary feature-writing—the bulk of the semester’s work—which is written in sections and go through several revisions. Borrowing the best tools from fiction writing—like character development, a strong arc, and engaging scenes—these features will be rich in narrative and as complex as the communities they portray. Students learn advanced re-porting techniques, story organization and editing skills, and debate the ethical issues inherent to truth-gathering. Readings likely include Joseph Mitchell, Katherine Boo, Alex Kotlowitz, Leon Dash, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc and Peter Hessler.

Notes

Suggested prerequisite WRTNG-UG 1300 or CRWRI-UA 825, CRWRI-UA 850 or permission of instructor.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1318 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2013

Shakespeare and the London Theatre

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Bella Mirabella

Description

In this class we take a visit to London in the years 1590 to 1616, in search of Shakespeare and the London in which he lived and wrote. During this period, London at the height of its Renaissance power, was a center of dramatic arts unparalleled in the rest of Europe. Volumes of plays were written, theaters were built all over London, and each day, during the season, those theaters were filled with audiences who were drawn from every social and economic class and both genders. Theater was a craze. It was the center of cultural life in London. And in the center of this remarkably, vibrant creative world, Shakespeare was a superstar. We examine the city of London, Shakespeare, and theater from literary, historical, political and cultural perspectives. Our consideration of the theater is in relation to other forms of popular entertainment, such as singing, dancing and mountebank performances, and how they might have influenced Shakespeare. We read a selection of plays written by Shakespeare such as As You Like It, Much Ado About Nothing, Richard III, Othello , and Measure for Measure . We also see film versions of some of the plays and go to the New York theatre.

Notes

Same as MEDI-UA 986 001.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9251 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

LONDON: Art and War, 1914-2004

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. This 15 week course will take an in-depth yet wide-ranging look at an important but curiously neglected aspect of modern western visual culture. Within a broadly chronological structure, topics to be dealt with will include the following: the relationship between art and atrocity, and the attendant problem of the aestheticisation of horror; the crucial influence of photography and the growth of mass communications; the issue of censorship, both external and internal, and the related issue of the "limits of representation" (above all, in relation to the Holocaust and Hiroshima); the distinction between official and unofficial war art, and between art and propaganda, between art that endorses and even glorifies war and an art of protest; issues of gender and sexuality; questions of cultural memory and the memorialization process, and the representation of war in contemporary art practice. It will consist of a combination of informal lectures, student presentations, at least one gallery visit, and the occasional film showing.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1735 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

American Narratives II

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
George Shulman

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1735

Description

The goal of this course is to create a conversation between post world war two North American literature, and contemporary political theory. We focus especially on the relationship between theorists making arguments using the genre of the treatise or monograph, and literary artists dramatizing protagonists acting in fictional worlds. What theoretical and political difference do differences of genre make in how readers (and citizens) apprehend and act in the world? But we also pursue more substantive questions. First, how is politics (and the meaning of democracy) represented and recast? Second, how do literary artists and theorists view the political role of language in the world, compared to the ways they use language in their texts? Third, how are issues of race and gender addressed? Fourth, what is the relationship between re-imagining (and redeeming) American nationhood, and in contrast, investing in post- (or anti-) national identifications? "Theorists" include Norman O. Brown, Sheldon Wolin, Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Jacques Ranciere, Lauren Berlant, Kimberlee Crenshaw, and Eve Sedgwick; literary artists include Thomas Pynchon, Norman Mailer, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Allan Ginsberg, Margaret Atwood, Toni Morrison, Phillip Roth.

Notes

Prerequisite IDSEM-UG 1592 or IDSEM-UG 1712 or IDSEM-UG 1475, or permission of the instructor.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ELEC-GG2548 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Storytelling: Writing Techniques for Fiction and Nonfiction

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Christopher Bram

Syllabus

ELEC-GG2548

Description

Whether you are writing fiction or nonfiction, story is an important part of prose. Story here is just another name for sequence and structure. Learning the right order for your sentences, paragraphs, and pages is as invaluable as learning how to put one foot in front of the other when learning to walk. In this course we will explore different ways to lay out actions and ideas, whether you're writing a novel, a book of history, an opinion piece, an essay or a short story. We will examine the best ways to make notes and sketch out early drafts as you find your voice and structure. You will gain practice in rewriting. And we will look at some of the different approaches to voice and narrative, reading such writers as Milan Kundera, Janet Malcolm, Truman Capote, Sigrid Nunez, and Primo Levi. Students will be expected to submit for workshop two separate projects, one work of fiction and another of nonfiction, in at least two drafts each, which we will discuss in class. In the end you are expected to produce a minimum of forty finished pages.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (chris.bram@yahoo.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

SASEM-UG9401 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

PRAGUE: Kafka and His Contexts

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. "A book must be an ax for the frozen sea in us," wrote Franz Kafka (1883-1924), one of the best known but least understood authors of our times. In this course, we will break some of the clichés which are stuck to Kafka's life and work and dive into the fascinating, intricate and profoundly humorous world of his thoughts and emotions. In Prague, the city that determined and held Kafka in its "claws", we will trace the possible sources of the writer's private obsessions which became the general characteristics of modern men: The sense of isolation, the anxiety, the self-irony, the sense of responsibility and guilt, the quest for freedom, the struggle of an individual against the system. We will read selected works of Kafka, but also Meyrink - the author of Prague ghetto - and Milan Kundera. This course aims to bring the students to a point from which they can find their own genuine and intimate understanding of Kafka's writing.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1573 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The New American Society

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Laurin Raiken

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1573

Description

Until 2007-08 we took for granted that in the past sixty years following World War II, the industrialized Western world experienced unprecedented economic expansion, and the United States was economically and geopolitically.” the dominant superpower, indeed America was the primary coordinator and beneficiary of the post World War II period. Only a few keen observers detected economic flaws or geopolitical vulnerability in what has been called “The American Century.” Since the mid-1970s however, there have been enormous changes in the United States and the world. New forms of violence, major economic shifts and geopolitical reversals have seriously undermined and changed the world order and particularly American lives and even more pointedly the lives of American youth. Recently the self-destruction and breakdown of the U.S. financial and economic systems triggered a deep global destabilization and The Great Recession. For a growing number of Americans life has become the equivalent to the severe dislocations of the Great Depression of the 1930s. With this broad historical are in view, this seminar offers a critical history of Post World War II America, focusing especially on major social, political, ideological, extremist “teavangelical” obstructionist aggression and the world historical economic collapse. Readings include social and political thinkers such as C. Wright Mills, Barrington Moore Jr., Hannah Arendt, and Arthur J. Vidich and economists such as, John Maynard Keynes, Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, the essayist John Lanchester, and Nobel Laureates Paul Krugman and Joseph Stieglitz. We read “Ill Fares the Land,” by the late New York University historian Tony Judt, and be inspired by the work of the great world class political economist and unsung American radical thinker, Thorstein Veblen. How do the emerging realities of today portend the future?

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1717 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Keynesian Century

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Andrew Bossie

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1717

Description

This class explores the intellectual history of economics during the 20th Century, and particularly the central economist of that century: John Maynard Keynes. What factors led to the ascendency of Keynesian economics during the middle of the 20th Century? What role did historical events such as the Great Depression, World War II, the Vietnam War and Stagflation play in determining this ascendance? What did the new, post-WWII technocratic class take from Keynes and what did they ignore? What led economists to largely disavow Keynes’ insights towards the end of the 20th Century? What does “Keynesian economics” even mean? We also examine works from the various schools of economic thought that emerged during the 20th century, all of which—in no small part—defined themselves either in support of or in opposition to Keynes’s ideas . Readings also include selections from Joan Robinson, Fredrick Hayek, Robert Lucas, Milton Friedman David Harvey, James Tobin, John Kenneth Galbraith and others.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9200 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

FLORENCE: History of Italian Fashion

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. Students trace the birth, evolution, decline, revival, and most recent developments of Italian fashion from the Late Gothic Age to the present "made in Italy" design. Italian fashion styles are decoded in relation to art history in an international, social and economic context. Fashion and its connections with culture, subculture, gender and communication are emphasized. On-site visits also illustrate the dominating role of Florence in fashion from its origin until now. Conducted in English.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel , Urry’s The Tourist Gaze, MacCannell’s The Tourist , and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: travel-studies.com.

Notes

Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site during Spring 2013.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

WRTNG-UG9150 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

BUENOS AIRES: Creative Writing: Argentina, Travel Writing at the End of the World

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. A practical course in the writing of creative literary texts: prose (short stories as well as literary non-fiction) and poetry. Selected published works will be analyzed in class both to provide inspiration for student writing as well as to represent literary structures and strategies. Writing assignments ranging from spontaneous to long-term projects will promote creative exploration and self-expression. Critical skills are emphasized and enhanced as students respond to each others’ work. Awareness of correct conventional use of the English language will be upheld. Students build up a body of work over the semester. For full credit and in demonstration of a writing “process,” the final portfolios should include both first drafts and subsequent revisions. At least one longer text (or set of poems) will be selected for submission as would be appropriate to publishers or literary contests.

Type

Global Programs (WRTNG-UG)

WRTNG-UG1550 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Fiction Writing

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Anthony Tognazzini

Description

This course provides students interested in writing fiction an opportunity to explore and discuss various forms of fiction writing in a workshop environment. The main objective of the course is to help students develop and revise their own works of fiction, and in the process hone individual styles and voices. One route to this goal is an inquiry into a range of techniques available to contemporary fiction writers. Emphasis is on characterization, structure, setting, narrative cohesion, and prose. A variety of the craft aspects of fiction writing are explored through exercises focused on narrative voice, plot, tension, time, sequence, dialogue, and other issues that arise in student work. Students present their own fiction, respond to the writings of others, and pose questions about literature, editing, and publishing, all within the supportive and responsive environment of the workshop group.

Notes

Students may take Fiction Writing two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

CLI-UG1460 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Literacy in Action

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Dianne Ramdeholl

Description

This course combines volunteer work in New York City adult literacy and English as a second language programs with an academic introduction to the philosophy, history, and current issues of adult literacy. An important emphasis of the class is to critically examine adult literacy through a social justice lens. Students work as volunteer teachers of reading and writing oral English or mentors at such institutions as the University Settlement, International Rescue Committee, Turning Point, and Fortune Society. In class they read about and discuss such key issues as adult literacy education policy and the impact on the field - including instruction, implications of being marginalized by educational systems, instructional approaches developed for adults; and the steps that might be taken to build support for high-quality, adult basic-skills programs. Throughout the course, students relate such issues to their own on-site experiences in class discussion and role-playing, and create a portfolio of writing that includes on-site observations, lesson plans, reflections, and a final analytical paper. Readings may include Making Meaning, Making Change (Auerbach); We Make the Road by Walking (Horton and Freire); Pedagogy of the Oppressed (Freire), as well as other articles and journals ( Focus on Basics and The Change Agent ).

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

IDSEM-UG1721 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Performativity and the Power of Words

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Luke Fleming

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1721

Description

The common expression, "Sticks and stones will break my bones but words will never hurt me," encapsulates a Euro-American understanding of language in which "real" actions are thought to contrast with "mere" words. And yet, as legal cases concerning hate speech, or controversies surrounding curse words on television make clear, despite our beliefs that they should not, words nevertheless do have powerful effects in the world. Indeed, language not only describes the world, it also acts on it. The concept of "performativity"—the idea that language not only describes things, but does things—has become increasingly important to understanding this, the power of words. This course gives students a solid grounding in the different understandings and orientations towards the idea of "performativity." We look at the social organization of powerful words expanding the philosophical account of speech as action to include more socially grounded accounts. Case-studies range from early anthropological work on magical, ritual and taboo speech, to contemporary work on hate speech and "gender performativity." Readings include J.L. Austin How to Do Things with Words ; J. Butler Excitable Speech ; J. Favret-Saada Deadly Words: Witchcraft in the Bocage .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9403 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

PRAGUE: Central European Film

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. This interdisciplinary seminar is designed to discuss and question the identity of specific nations in European space, which has always been a fascinating crossroad of ideas and ideologies as well as the birthplace of wars and totalitarian systems. The course will cover masterpieces of Russian, Hungarian, German, Polish and Czech cinematography, focusing on several crucial periods of history, in particular WWII and its aftermath, showing moral dilemmas of individuals and nations under the Nazi regime as well as revealing the bitter truth of the Stalinist years.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1042 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Digital Revolution: History of Media III

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Stephen Duncombe

Description

We are in the midst of a revolution. Computers permeate nearly every aspect of our life, yet we understand relatively little about how they work, their historical development, and their impact on our thought and actions. As with previous technological and communications revolutions like the rise of print and the ascendency of the image, computing is transforming our economic and political landscape, bringing with it new possibilities as well as new problems. In this course we explore this ever changing and rapidly expanding terrain, paying special attention to how computers and the Internet are transforming how we experience and understand identity and community, control and liberation, simulation and authenticity, creation and collaboration, and the practice of politics. Authors whose works we read may include: Jean Baudrillard, Jorge Luis Borges, Yochai Benkler, Nicholar Carr, the Critical Art Ensemble, Galileo, Donna Haraway, Lawrence Lessig, Lewis Mumford, Plato, the RAND Corporation, Sherry Turkle, and Ellen Ullman.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Transfer Student Research Seminar: Myths and Fables in Popular Culture

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Patricia Lennox

Syllabus

FIRST-UG801

Description

Myths, fables, folk tales, and fairy tales are universal. Their heroes, villains, gods and monsters are as old as storytelling and as new as the latest award-winning film. In this class we examine some of these stories and their histories, watching the shifts in emphasis as they are retold and adapted, but also considering why certain mythic figures, such as the vampire, gain greater currency in contemporary tales. Our research focuses on old and new versions of tales, their cultural construction and the critical discourse surrounding them. It serves as the springboard for a series of exercises focused on research methods, several short writing assignments, and a major research paper. Sources include, but are not limited to, selections from works by: J.R.R. Tolkien, Disney, Ovid, Apuleius, Charles Perrault, the Brothers Grimm, Angela Carter, Bruno Bettelheim, Joseph Campbell, Jack Zipes, and Nina Auerbach.

Notes

Open to Gallatin transfer students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Transfer Student Research Seminar (FIRST-UG)

INDIV-UG1901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean's Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student's work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is December 3. To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

SASEM-UG9551 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

TEL AVIV: Food and Identity in the Middle East and its Jewish Communities

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-TEL AVIV. The objective of the course is threefold. First (weeks 1-3), it exposes students to the relationships between food, class and gender and to the extent to which food is part of our symbolic system and mode of thought. This discussion introduces students to the main issues in food studies and provides them with a theoretical ground for the course. Second, (weeks 4-7), we will look at the ways in which food has been used to support the Zionist ideology and the formation of the Jewish nation-state. Lectures focus on the ways in which women have been involuntarily recruited into the process of nation building via food practices. Additionally, I address the various immigrant communities in Israel that, although encouraged to change their food habits, have kept their foodways at the level of the home. We will analyze the ways in which immigrants change their domestic foods and the reasons for the changes. Our discussion will question the social, political and economic circumstances that have pushed immigrants to use food as a means of making a living and the changes their dishes have undergone in aim of appealing to a wide array of consumers. Moreover, in order to understand the relationship between ideology, migration and ethnicity in Israel, we will look at the role food and feeding have played in the formation and protection of the ideology of the traditional kibbutz, as opposed to the new kibbutz. Finally, we shall look at various Israeli open-air food markets and their contribution to the preservation of ethnic hierarchies in Israeli society. We will conclude the second part of the course with a field trip to the “Mahane Yehuda food market” in Jerusalem (week 8) and an in-class short midterm followed by a movie on week nine. The third part of the course (weeks 10-14) looks at social and political processes that have affected Middle Eastern cuisines. Our discussion on food and colonialism will elaborate on issues such as the identity of the Palestinian citizens of Israel and the role food occupies in creating a distinctive national identity. Also we shall look at the modernization of the Middle East and its effect on local diets. We will conclude the course by analyzing the consequences of globalization on local diets and the way in which certain Middle Eastern foods have gone global.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9150 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

BUENOS AIRES: Tango and Mass Culture

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. This course explores Tango as an aesthetic, social and cultural formation that is articulated in interesting and complex ways with the traditions of culture and politics in Argentina and Latin America more generally. During the rapid modernization of the 1920s and 1930s, Tango (like Brazilian Samba), which had been seen as a primitive and exotic dance, began to emerge as a kind of modern primative art form that quickly came to occupy a central space in nationalist discourse. The course explores the way that perceptions of a primative and a modern converge in this unique and exciting art. In addition, the course will consider tango as a global metaphor with deeply embedded connections to urban poverty, social marginalization, and masculine authority.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

500

Cannot serve request to /content/gallatin/en/academics/courses.html on this server


ApacheSling/2.2 (Day-Servlet-Engine/4.1.52, Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM 1.7.0_79, Linux 2.6.32-642.3.1.el6.centos.plus.x86_64 amd64)