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Found 3405 courses
K30.1564 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2006

Advanced Poetry Writing

4 units

Description

A workshop designed for serious poets, this class will teach students how to take their writing to another level both intellectually and artistically; depth of theme, imagination, and craft will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on developing and strengthening one's personal style and voice. Through work-shopping, students will further refine their critical eye as poet and reader. The class will include exercises and readings. Submission of work will be discussed and encouraged.

Notes

Prerequisite K30.1560 or V39.0817 or V39.0830 or permission of the instructor.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

K20.1380 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2006

Three Revolutions: Haiti, Mexico, Cuba

4 units

Description

We compare and contrast the revolutionary events, processes and outcomes in Haiti, Mexico, and Cuba. None were simple reflexes of European or North American ideas and politics, although such external factors were among their causes and effects. Each had significant anti-colonial or anti-imperial components, as well as social and political conflicts and alliances within the immediate societies of the revolutionary countries which involved both "internal" and "external" groups and ideas. We consider the roles of such investors, landowners, mineowners, merchants, bankers, politicians, state administrators, peasants, laborers, intellectuals, migrants, and other social groups in-country or in the relevant imperial centers. We analyze interrelations among kinds of capitalism, and anti-capitalist ideologies or social forms and types of rationality; changing revolutionary processes and demands; changing role and organization of the state; the supporters or antagonists of the revolution among differing social groups at differing times; the revolution's relation to earlier and later movements. Where necessary, we invoke examples from other countries. Readings might include selections from Wolf, Peasant Wars of the Twentieth Century; DuBois, Avengers of the New World; Fick, The Making of Haiti; Trouillot, Haiti: State Against Nation; Gonzales, The Mexican Revolution, 1910-1940; Nugent, The Spent Cartridges of Revolution; Stephen, Zapata Lives!; Kapcia, Cuba: Isle of Dreams; Saney, Cuba: A Revolution in Motion; Pérez-Stabli, The Cuban Revolution.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K45.1445 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2006

Shifting Focus I: Video Production and Community Activism

4 units

Description

From the taping of the police beating of Rodney King, to online advocacy, and the explosion of YouTube, video has become an essential tool for social and political actors. This course will be a hands-on class in video production in the service of political and community organizing. Class time will be used to: examine the biases of corporate-controlled media; learn the theory and history of video activism; develop basic camera and editing skills; and reflect on lessons learned in the field. Outside of class students will break into groups and collaborate with local community organizations in the conception and production of a short video piece, and subsequently strategize with those organizations about how to most effectively use video in their particular struggles. Readings will include selections from Noam Chomsky, Robert McChesney and Thomas Harding.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

K30.1560 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2006

The Art and Craft of Poetry

4 units

Description

In this workshop poets will focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer's process. A weekly reading of a poem by each poet in the circle will serve as point of departure for discussions of the relationships of craft and expression. The emphasis is on inhabiting the quality of language; some time is spent at defining clarity, aesthetics, elegance, and eloquence. The course also covers a brief review of some of poetry's history, including metric and syllabic measures of writing.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

K70.2225 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2006

Master's Thesis Seminar

4 units

Description

This course engages students in the conceptual and technical processes leading to a thesis: articulating a core problem, reviewing appropriate literatures, designing effective methods, and constructing persuasive analyses. Through discussions of both published research articles and student work, the seminar examines the conventions of scholarly discourse, strategies of analysis and argumentation, and the ways in which writing can serve as a means to discover ideas. Students also learn academic writing skills; the conventions of scholarly discourse; strategies for building arguments; and the use of writing to explore ideas. Sections of the course focus on different thesis formats (research, artistic, project), but all take the student to the stage of preparing a thesis proposal.

Notes

pass/fail only. sec. 1 for the artistic thesis; sec. 2 for the research or project thesis.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

K20.1452 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2006

Primary Texts: Hebrew Bible & Politics

2 units

Description

This class reads the Hebrew Bible as a work of political thought and literature. From this perspective, it narrates the relationship between god and human beings and the Hebrew people especially, but to raise fundamental questions about the nature of the human condition. In political terms, these questions concern the character of authority and the constitution of community, the meaning of history and the nature of freedom, the causes of suffering and the possibility of redemption. But the Bible does not speak in one voice: it formulates and “answers” these questions in a variety of genres, by parables of fratricide, stories of founding, poems of protest, and in voices as different as Cain, Moses, David or Job. We will analyze the political meaning and cultural implications of these clashing elements, and of the over-arching narrative seeming to contain them. How can we read them? What is their impact? Do they still frame how we think about life and art, about morality and politics? Given such questions, we cannot privilege a religious orientation, which must become one of many perspectives we bring to bear on the meanings of the text. Also, we cannot read the text in its entirety. We will focus on Genesis, Exodus, Prophecy, and Job, and will conclude by reading one gospel text.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K30.1324 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2006

The Journal in the City

4 units

Description

Literary journalists have long been inspired by the urban muse. Paris, London, Berlin, Prague and New York have nurtured such noted journalists as Rilke, Woolf, Kafka, Walter Benjamin and Allen Ginsberg. As we look into the journals of these intriguing writers we will immerse ourselves in the New York City milieu, asking what is the impact of the city on the text, as well as examining the effect of the city on our own journals. As writers, how do we interact with the city? Whom do we become in our journals in the city? We will keep and develop literary journals for the duration of the course: our "New York City Journals."

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

K20.1239 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2006

Classic Texts and Contemporary Life

4 units

Description

This course examines several "classic" texts to understand both their own intrinsic merit and their influence on society from their inception until our own time. Our emphasis, indeed, is on using these texts to understand our lives and world now. We explore classic texts in relation to contemporary life's dilemmas of consumerism and spiritualism, individual rights and community rights, vocation and career, God and the afterlife, rebellion and escape from freedom. Readings may include Aeschylus' The Oresteia, Sappho's Poems, Plato's Republic, Lucretius' On the Nature of the Universe, Ovid's Metamorphoses or Cicero's On the Laws, Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales or Cervantes's Don Quixote.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1322 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2006

The Ancient Greeks and Their Influence

4 units

Description

The astounding power of the ancient Greek philosophers and poets has been felt from their times to ours. Scholars in every age have pondered the questions they raised: What is the nature of man? What is the relationship of God or gods to humans? What is a good life? How do we live it? What is our relationship to nature? This course examines the way the Greeks examined these questions and the Greek influence on subsequent cultures. Works to be studied may include: The Odyssey, Oedipus Rex, The Symposium, The Consolation of Philosophy, Midsummer Night's Dream, and selected poetry from Wordsworth, W.B. Yeats, and Wendell Berry.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K30.1350 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2006

Writing for Young Readers

4 units

Description

This course guides students in writing fiction for readers age ten through adolescence. While writing, workshopping, and revising, students consider both theoretical and practical issues of writing for young people. We explore the history of children's literature and examine the academic journal Children's Literature, the newsletter of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, the American Library Association's Newbery Awards and various bestseller lists. Each student presents an analysis of a favorite book. Texts we read and analyze as models will likely include such "contemporary classics" for younger readers as Lois Lowry's Anastasia Krupnik, Karen Cushman's The Midwife's Apprentice, Walter Dean Myers's Monster, and Francesa Lia Block's Weetzie Bat; and recent works that are both popular and critically acclaimed, such as Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, Sherman Alexie's The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, and E. Lockhart's The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks. We may attend a reading by a writer or editor of fiction for young readers; a writer and/or a publishing professional will be our guest speaker.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

K20.1268 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2006

Cultural Politics of Childhood

4 units

Description

This interdisciplinary seminar examines the ways that society has imbued children and childhood with certain cultural meanings. We start by focusing on two widespread assumptions about children—that they are naturally innocent and that they are routinely endangered by social problems such as violent crime, drug abuse, and sexual predators. Next, we study how these cultural assumptions originated in Romantic and Victorian visions of childhood and how "childhood" itself emerged as a coherent life stage only in the past several centuries. Finally, we study how childhood increasingly has become the focus of academic attention, popular concern, and state control. While the main focus of the course is on cultural understandings of childhood, we also examine how children themselves have made sense of their lives. Texts come from the fields of literature, history, political science, psychology, and queer theory. They may include Ariès's Centuries of Childhood, Barrie's Peter Pan, Levine's Harmful to Minors, and Postman's Disappearance of Childhood.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1222 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2006

Art Now: Tradition and Change

4 units

Description

This course focuses on the contemporary art world and the forces producing continuous change and the re-creation of tradition. We examine new media, technologies and performance and trace their origins in ancient communities, shamanism and ritual. We explore the relationships between new media/performance forms and traditional artistic practices. We ask such questions as: What is the importance of place in energizing creativity? Have the forces of the art world shifted from capital cities outward toward unexpected influences and movements? Is New York still the capital of the art world? We pursue these questions by visiting museums and galleries, through imaginative writing and making art; and through individual and group projects. Readings may include Meyer Schapiro's Modern Art, Irving Sandler's The New York School, Harold Rosenberg's The Tradition of the New, Toni Morrison's Playing in the Dark, Clyde Taylor's The Mask of Art, Suzi Gablik's Reenchantment of Art, John Berger's The Shape of a Pocket, Victor Turner's From Ritual to Theatre, Dorothy Lee's Valuing the Self, Mary Anne Staniszewski's Believing Is Seeing and Robert Goldwater's Primitivism in Modern Art.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K30.1316 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2006

Telling Truths: The Skill of Autobiography

4 units

Description

How can one tell the "truth" about one's life in narrative form? In this course we will explore the pleasures and dangers of telling stories about our lives through writing autobiographical essays, as well as through reading the autobiographies of selected others. Readings may include texts by Janet Frame, Nancy Mairs, Mary Karr, and David Sedaris. We will analyze the way in which self-narrative is constructed from the tangled materials of real life, how we read and understand the life writing of others, and how others' stories can influence our own. Topics include authenticity, memory, identity, voice, point of view, and relationships.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

K40.1625 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2006

Digital Art and New Media

4 units

Description

Digital media and new methods of visual communication affect how we work, play, see our environment and ourselves. With digital media we can build images and edit graphics easily and effectively. Painting and imaging programs form flexible and powerful tools for constructing imagery that lead to new ways of creating work, new design criteria, and new aesthetics. When computer imaging is combined with interactivity, and distribution such as CD, DVD, and the Internet, the result is interactive multimedia. This project based studio course, designed for beginning to intermediate students, explores ways of constructing images and interactivity. In the computer lab, we focus on methods of creating digital media and art, including painting programs, digital image editing, authoring interactivity and time-based work. Critiques of individual student work, readings, and discussion will examine the evolving formal criteria, aesthetics and social implications of this work. Readings include selections from Paul Klee's Pedagogical Sketchbook. We will visit exhibits of digital work, on-line and at New York City's art spaces.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

K40.1410 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2006

Outdoor Drawing and Painting: Discovering Subject Matter

4 units

Description

By combining drawing and painting outdoors, in a variety of sites around New York, with the study of art making theory in the studio, this course provides a firm base not only for making art, but for understanding complex art movements like cubism, abstract expressionism and pop art, among others. The use of several sites within New York City as the subject matter for our creative work outdoors and in the studio provides us with significant options to produce unmatched, highly original and inventive imagery by converting sources into pictorial elements. Use of particular visual art media outdoors facilitates convenient, rapid use of sources. Other art materials are more suitable for work in the art studio. The most important component of art making, how sources can trigger conversion into visual art form, is an intrinsic part of this course.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

K40.1450 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2006

On Display: Museums and Visual Culture in New York

4 units

Description

As the Museum capital of the world, New York City offers students a unique opportunity to explore the roles and cultural meanings of "the museum." In this course, students will investigate the historical, philosophical, theoretical, and practical aspects of the collection and exhibition of art and artifacts in museums. Using some of the leading museum/art institutions in New York as examples, this course will begin with a survey of the history of the museum, followed by topics such as audience and community outreach, curatorial strategies for exhibition and collection development, conservation issues, and museum architecture. Course readings will include such works as Introduction to Museum Work by G. Ellis Burcaw; Museum Skepticism: A History of the Display of Art in Public Galleries by David Carrier; and Reinventing the Museum: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on the Paradigm Shift edited by Gail Anderson. There will be two museum visits and one gallery visit scheduled outside of class time as well as an in-class presentation by each student.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1658 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Spies Like Us? Cold War Science as the Ultimate National Security Threat

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Jose Perillan

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1658

Description

On Friday June 19th, 1953 just before the sun set on Sing-Sing prison, Ethyl and Julius Rosenberg were executed by electrocution for their part in an espionage network that transferred classified information associated with top secret U.S. atomic research to the Soviet Union. This case was a landmark at the height of tensions associated with the second Red Scare of the 1940s and 50s, but the almost half-century of Cold War tensions, teetering on the brink of global annihilation, brought out the devastating threats of societal paranoia and political persecution. Throughout the Cold War period science was wielded by both the United States and the Soviet Union with alarming efficacy. As big science began to dominate international and domestic policy, the two superpowers played ‘chicken’ with an atomic arms race and ‘catch me if you can’ with a space race that seemed to fuel animosity and bring us ever closer to the brink of world catastrophe. In this seminar we will use primary and secondary sources to examine the complex role of science during the Cold War, as weapon, threat, and salvation. Readings may include works by J.R. Oppenheimer, Deborah Cadbury, Albert Einstein, John Lewis Gaddis, John Earl Hayes & Harvey Klehr, and Jessica Wang among others.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CORE-GG2340 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master’s Thesis and Defense, K70.2335, are required to register for Thesis Advisement (1 credit) each semester (including the summer, if you plan on graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. This 1-credit course is not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master’s degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

Pass/fail only. Permission required to register; please contact Gallatin's Office of Student Services.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1653 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2011

Friendship And Love Between Men in Takeshi Kitano’s Movies

2 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Nina Cornyetz

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1653

Description

Takeshi Kitano, aka Beat Takeshi, is probably the most famous contemporary Japanese actor, filmmaker, and personality. This course will take up the issue of a continuum, or a “thin blue line,” between male homosociality and homosexuality as theorized by Eve Sedgwick in her Between Men , by exploring the role of desire in male friendship, male love and homophobia in the context of three Kitano films: Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence , Sonatine , and Taboo . We will be attentive to how male friendships are protected from, or conversely, directly confront homoeroticism, as well as to how women figure as objects between men. We will consider other issues in relation to the specific historical contexts of the three films: (1) colonialism, wartime ethics, and racial politics for Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence ; (2) Yakuza characters as film tropes and Okinawan-Japanese ethnic politics for Sonatine ; and (3) the politics of male-male relations in samurai culture for Taboo . Readings may include the following: selections from Eve Sedgwick, Between Men and Epistemology of the Closet, Gregory Pflugfelder, Cartographies of Desire , Lydia N. Yu-Jose, Japan Views the Philippines, 1900-1944, and Bhabha, The Location of Culture; Earl Jackson, “Desire at Cross-Cultural Purposes,” positions; Timothy Corrigan, A Short Guide to Writing About Film; and Bob Davis, “Takeshi Kitano,” Senses of Cinema.

Notes

Course meets during the last seven weeks only, October 26–December 13.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1504 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Guilty Subjects: Guilt in Literature, Law and Psychoanalysis

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Sara Murphy

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1504

Description

This seminar will explore guilt as the link between the three broad disciplinary arenas of our title. Literary works from ancient tragedy to the modern novel thematize guilt in various ways. Freud places it at the center of his practice and his theory of mind. While law seems reliant mainly upon a formal attribution of guilt in order to determine who gets punished and to what degree, we might also suggest it relies upon “guilty subjects” for its operation. With all of these different deployments of the concept, we might agree it is a central one, yet how to define it remains a substantial question. Is the prominence of guilt in modern Western culture a vestige of a now-lost religious world? Is it, as Nietzsche suggests, an effect of “the most profound change man ever experienced when he finally found himself enclosed within the wall of society and of peace?” Freud seems to concur when he argues that guilt must be understood as a kind of internal self-division where aggressivity is turned against the self. Is guilt a pointless self-punishment, meant to discipline us? Or does it continue to have an important relation to the ethical? Readings may include Freud, Nietzsche, Foucault, Slavoj Zizek, Toni Morrison, Ursula LeGuin, W.G. Sebald, and some case law, among others.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG383 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Writing Seminar: Coming of Age: Selves, Writers, Societies

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Andrew Goldstone

Syllabus

FIRST-UG383

Description

This course explores the inescapably social process of growing up. How can people both become who they want to be and participate fully in society? What do personal development and socio-economic development have to do with one another? How do coming-of-age fictions from Jane Austen to Kazuo Ishiguro reflect on questions of identity, belonging, sexuality, growth, modern-ization, and citizenship? These questions will be the occasion for intensive work on students’ own intellectual development as writers and readers. Three shorter essay assignments—selecting and interpreting textual evidence, responding to a theory, and incorporating a personal motive—build up to the culminating literary-critical paper on the coming-of-age novel. Social-scientific accounts of the development of persons and societies will provide context and counterpoint to the literary works. Readings include works by Jane Austen, James Joyce, and Anne Carson; scholarly essays in sociology, psychology, and literary studies.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1664 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
FA 2011

Omens and Oracles: Reading the Future and Retaining the Past in Early China

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Ethan Harkness

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1664

Description

When ancient Chinese kings seared sacred bones with elemental fire, reading the future from the resulting cracks went hand in hand with creating archival records to preserve the past. In this class, we will explore several interrelated early Chinese divination traditions through classical texts, archaeology, and recently excavated manuscripts. In all cases we will pay attention to the complex interplay between past, present, and future, including aspects of the history of writing, the history of the book, and the interwoven histories of science and religion. After starting with a discussion of the above-mentioned oracle bones, we will proceed to examine the enigmatic Yijing ( Book of Changes ), the earliest and most revered of all the Chinese classics. Then we will consider a popularization of divination practices in the form of almanacs that circulated widely in ancient China. Students can expect to try their hands at the actual practice of the various divination techniques covered, but most class time will be used to engage important themes arising from our investigations, Readings may include: The Ancestral Landscape: Time, Space, and Community in Late Shang China (Ca. 1200-1045 B.C.) by David Keightley, Oracle Bones: A Journey Through Time in China by Peter Hessler, the Yijing ( Book of Changes ), selections from The Cambridge History of Ancient China: From the Origins of Civilization to 221 B.C ., and select scholarly articles.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1317 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Only Connect: Strategies for Writing

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Ed Park

Description

The late W.G. Sebald perfected a sublime art of connection—teasing out associations between ancient snapshots, newspaper clippings, and the words of others. His elegantly haunting books (which blurred novel, history, and memoir) couldn’t be more different from the typical posts that proliferate in the so-called blogosphere. Yet Internet writing, with its hyperlinks and screen-grabs, calls upon a magpie instinct that Sebald and other illustrious writers would instantly recognize. This course takes students on a tour of writing methods old and new, imparting a ravenous approach to composition useful for work in any genre: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and the borderlands of our virtual reality. Classes will focus on the use of images in text, the cento, the footnote, the double-jointed review, and more. Writing will include frequent in-class experiments and several longer assignments. Students will read works by Nicholson Baker, Alison Bechdel, Harry Stephen Keeler, Raymond Queneau, and others.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1688 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Great Escape: Exploring Travel Narratives

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Aaron Hamburger

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1688

Description

Why do people travel, why do they write about it, and why do they read about it? We’ll analyze the surprisingly complex answers to these three seemingly simple questions, as well as how they shape narratives focused on place. Along the way, we’ll consider questions of social identity and cultural difference, the search for adventure and “authenticity,” the relationship between tourism and colonialism, and the relationship of place to the self. Readings will include a variety of nineteenth and twentieth non-fiction texts including Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain, Berlin Diaries by Christopher Isherwood, A Small Place by Jamaica Kincaid, and The Art of Travel by Alain de Botton, as well as essays by George Orwell, Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace, Francine Prose, and Martha Stewart. In addition, we’ll look at a travel-themed work of children’s literature ( The Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum), a novel ( A Passage to India by E. M. Forster), poetry by Patricia Smith about New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina, as well as travel websites like TripAdvisor.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1351 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or EARLY
or GLOBAL
FA 2011

Passion and Poetics in Early Japan

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Nina Cornyetz

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1351

Description

It can be argued that until the 1880s one thing was absent in Japanese literary and performing arts: the notion of an interiorized subject. In fact, the premodern Japanese arts are examples of extreme "exteriority," that privilege form, word play and intertextuality and enfold the human being and human erotic passions within rituals for purity, and harmony with a cosmology of the heavens. This course will explore premodern Japanese poetics and prose, performing and visual arts, from the very first writings through the nineteenth century, in relation to history and religious and philosophic belief systems such as Buddhism, Shintoism and Confucianism. Texts will include: selections of poetry, emaki (picture scrolls), noh and puppet plays, selections from The Tale of Genji, The Pillow Book, Essays in Idleness .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG76 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: What is "Development?"

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Rosalind Fredericks

Syllabus

FIRST-UG76

Description

From Bono to indigenous community activists in the Amazon, everyone is talking about 'development.' The term, however, means different things to different people and has a long and contentious history. This class provides an introduction to the study of international development and poverty from an interdisciplinary perspective. To begin, it examines the different measures of the state of development, from conventional economic metrics like Gross Domestic Product to notions of "Development as Freedom." Building on this, it then explores some of the most influential contemporary voices in the process of development. Of central importance here will be a consideration of the central development actors, including multilateral institutions like the UN and World Bank, as well as states, NGOs, and community groups. Finally, it will explore some of the key themes in contemporary development policy, including gender, the environment, and human rights. The goal is to provide a clear sense of the chief objects, processes, actors, and policies of international development in order to grapple with the important stakes held by these different approaches to combating global poverty. Readings may include: Amartya Sen, Joseph Stiglitz, Jeff Sachs, Bill Easterly, and Dambisa Moyo.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1648 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2011

Environment and Development in Africa

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Rosalind Fredericks

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1648

Description

This course explores the political ecology of African development in historic perspective. Drawing from anthropology, geography, environmental history, development studies, and political science, the course joins theoretical and empirical perspectives on the politics of African environments. The first part will focus on the history of human-environment relations on the continent, paying particular attention to the exploitation of the natural environment during colonialism and patterns of extraction and trade set up during that time. Building on this history, we will then concentrate on the postcolonial period in order to compare different forms of exploitation across Africa and their connections to key development debates and national development trajectories. Specific topics will include: the extractive industries; the management of the urban environment; wildlife conservation and tourism; agriculture and rural livelihoods; environmental governance regimes; environmental he alth and justice; gender and environment; natural resources and war; and vulnerability and adaptation to climate change. Aiming to provide more complex, critical, and nuanced understandings of human-environment relations on the continent, we will draw from academic texts and novels as well as documentaries. Readings may include: James Ferguson, Paul Richards, James Fairhead, and Adam Hochschild.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1209 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Art of Choreography

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Kathryn Posin

Description

It was the modern dance choreographer Martha Graham who said, “We are all born with genius. It’s just that most people lose it in the first five minutes.” This class helps the student get back his or her original choreographic ability. We will study the elements of dance—time, space and energy—and, each week, explore a different aspect of the choreographic process. The students, through improvisations and short movement studies, will discover their movement vocabulary. Each dancemaker will find their own individual choreographic voice while being introduced to some of the major twentieth century choreographers. By nature we are all dancers, with or without years of training. Choreographic process, whether one wishes to be a choreographer or not, is a superb model for thinking, assembling and creating. A digital media component teaches students to incorporate video into their work. The final performance is in a theatrical setting with lights, simple costume and possibly video. Readings will include: What is Dance? by Roger Copeland and Marshall Cohen (eds.), The Art of Making Dances by Doris Humphrey, The Intimate Act of Choreography by Blom and Chaplin, Space Harmony by Rudolph Laban. To view a clip of the final performance from last year, visit YouTube, The Art of Choreography.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG42 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Capitalism and Democracy

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Kimberly Phillips-Fein

Description

For many political and economic thinkers, the free market and the private economy are the fundamental building blocks of democratic political systems. Yet activist movements of the past twenty years have been increasingly critical of the ways in which private corporations and the inequality of wealth negatively affect our democracy. This seminar will interrogate the relationship between capitalism and democracy, exploring the relationship between economy and politics in the United States and possibly other countries. What are corporations, and what are the philosophical, economic, historical, and political justifications for their existence? What are the essential characteristics of American democracy, and how does our political system cope—or fail to—with large concentrations of private power and wealth? Possible readings may include Upton Sinclair, Max Weber, Milton Friedman, and Eric Schlosser’s Fast Food Nation .

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1652 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Science and Culture

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Myles Jackson

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1652

Description

This course, which spans from the Scientific Revolution to the present, examines various examples of how the conduct and context of science are framed by culture, and conversely, how science shapes culture. Which models proffered by various historians, philosophers, cultural anthropologists, and sociologists can begin to explain this relationship? The first portion of this course addresses how scientific knowledge was intricately intertwined with religious and political knowledge during the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment. The next section illustrates how important developments in thermodynamics (or the physics of work and waste) led to improvements in nineteenth-century musical instrument design and a change in musical aesthetics. Similarly, we shall discuss how twentieth-century technological and scientific developments in fin-de-siècle Europe and the U.S. directly led to new artistic expressions and aesthetics. The final third of the course looks at how the content of scientific and technological knowledge associated with “Big Science” from World War II to the present owes much to the development of national defense in the case of physics and to venture-corporate capitalism in the case of molecular biology. Rather than simply stay at the level of case studies, we shall continually test the various models, which attempt to explain the complex and historically contingent relationship between science and culture, including Marx’s theory of base-superstructure, Kuhn’s paradigm, Latour’s social constructivism, Shapin and Schaffer’s historical social constructivism, and Galison’s bricolage model and trading zones. Finally, the course will force students to think about related issues, such as the history of objectivity and the differences and similarities between science on the one hand, and the social sciences and humanities on the other. Readings include: Shapin and Schaffer, Galison, Jackson, Latour, Marx, and Kuhn. This interdisciplinary seminar may be used to fulfill the science requirement.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1662 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Critical Cultural Theory: Benjamin and Adorno on Culture and Modernity

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Sara Murphy

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1662

Description

In this course, we’ll engage in close reading of some of the work of two of the twentieth century’s most important thinkers: Walter Benjamin (1892-1940) and Theodore Adorno (1903-69). Although Benjamin’s relations to

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1359 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

American Capitalism in the Twentieth Century

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Kimberly Phillips-Fein

Description

This course examines the development of capitalism in the United States over the course of the twentieth century, paying special attention to the relationship between the economy and political, cultural and intellectual transformations. It will cover the rise of the modern corporation, the labor movement, the Great Depression and the New Deal, the economic impact of war in the twentieth century, racism and economics, the changing economic position of women, deindustrialization and the stock market boom of the 1990s. The class will focus in particular on the problem of how Americans have confronted and sought to understand hard economic times. In a country whose culture privileges the “American dream” of economic success, how have people dealt with struggle, difficulty and failure? How have financial panics, depressions and recessions, and economic decline affected American political economy and culture? Readings will incorporate both primary and secondary sources. Possible authors include Betty Friedan, John Kenneth Galbraith, and Ronald Reagan.

Notes

Same as HIST 112 001.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1388 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Thinking About Seeing

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Keith Miller

Description

Through an art historical lens, this course explores visual communication in a media-saturated society. We will analyze how people “speak” through images and symbols as well as words and how we “read” what we see. This class will attempt to understand the tools used to reach an audience. Images and texts from the past and present will help us assess the character of various media and their personal as well as political implications. Texts will include works by Barthes, Baudrillard, Benjamin, Lev-Strauss, McLuhan, Sontag and other seminal essays on the media.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1608 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Justice and the Political

4 units Fri
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Justin Holt

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1608

Description

Justice is often understood as a concept that structures political life, by indicating who should be enfranchised, how to rule fairly, who should be punished and how. Even more broadly, justice indicates what constitutes a common good as well as who should benefit (and how) from collective actions. But how is the definition of justice established and implemented? Does justice denote a transcendent standard we access by philosophy or by revelation and then “apply” to and in political life? Or is any definition of justice necessarily shaped by political struggles by actors with contrasting interests and points of views? Must we escape politics to determine justice rightly, or is that an impossible and ultimately tyrannical idea? But if we define justice through politics, is what we call justice necessarily going to be the rule of the strong? This course will consider four attempts to define justice that also explore its relationship to politics: Plato’s Republic, Kant’s Ground work for a Metaphysics of Morals, and Hegel’s Philosophy of Right.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG377 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Writing Seminar: Working

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Chinnie Ding

Description

Visible and invisible, lonesome and collaborative, inspired and endured, labor makes and maintains the world we live in. To learn about work is to learn how most people spend most of the day, securing means, pursuing dreams, existing in active relation to other people -- whether spreadsheeting or ship-breaking, trading or patrolling, composing or caretaking. How do we come to choose the work we do, and how to navigate the seeming injustices that come with the division of labor? What are the ethical and economic ties that bind us to the faraway strangers, or half-familiars we greet everyday, whose strenuous productivity we benefit from? How have art and literature depicted working people, and when does work go undepicted? What difference does work make for our notions and experience of time? Through topics such as globalization, class, migration, slavery, and unemployment, and genres like pastoral and documentary, this course explores the challenges that work has posed to political thought, political action, and aesthetic representation alike. Readings span fiction, oral history, poetry, philosophy, and art criticism. Films and a field trip or two will supplement the readings.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1657 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Darwin and Ethics

4 units Tue
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
George Levine

Description

In this course, we will be considering the way Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection affects the way we think about the “ethical.” One form of the question is, “If Darwin’s theory is correct, how is it possible that humans can be moral beings, can be altruistic?” For many people in Darwin’s time and in our own, true morality is only possible if it has an extra-human, divine or transcendental basis. Otherwise, morality is simply arbitrary. Darwin's naturalism raises the issue of whether ethics are objectively “real” in the same way that stars or material things are real. A related issue is nature/nurture: is human behavior determined biologically or culturally? In this class, the discussion of these issues will focus primarily on the nineteenth-century responses to Darwin’s theory, but will also attend to a few arguments of modern scientists relating to questions of ethics. The point of the course is not to provide an unequivocal answer to the questions but to consider why and how the questions arise, and what possible implications they have for our own lives. Readings will include or be drawn from: Paley, Natural Theology; John Stuart Mill, “Nature”; Arthur Balfour, Foundations of Belief, “Ethics and Theism”; Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species , “Struggle for Existence,”; the chapter on the origins of morality from Charles Darwin’s The Descent of Man; The discussion of religion from Darwin’s Autobiography ; W. K. Clifford's "The Ethics of Belief"; William James, “Is Life Worth Living?”; T. H. Huxley, “Prolegomena,” Evolution and Ethics; Bertrand Russell, “A Free Man’s Worship”; Daniel Dennett, Darwin’s Dangerous Idea; Stephen Jay Gould, Ever Since Darwin; Eiseley. The Darwin Century .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1034 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Writing About Performance

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Julie Malnig

Description

This writing seminar will train students to become critical viewers of performance and translate their "looking" into descriptive and analytical prose. Students will be introduced to a variety of critical strategies and approaches---from formalist to ethnographic to various forms of sociological and cultural criticism---to develop their interpretive skills. These analyses will help students discover how various performance mediums are constituted, how they "work," and how they create meaning for viewers. Assignments will include interviews, artists’ profiles, performance documentations, cultural reviews, and critical and/or theoretical analyses. Occasional group excursions to performances will be arranged, as well as class speakers. Some of the authors, essayists, and artists whose works we may read include: Susan Sontag; Michael Kirby; Edwin Denby; Deborah Jowitt; Joan Acocella; Joyce Carol Oates; Anna Deavere Smith; Spalding Gray; and Henry Louis Gates, jr.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1629 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Kafka and His Context

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Magdalena Platzova

Description

“A book must be an ax for a frozen sea in us,” wrote Franz Kafka (1893-1924), one of the best known but least understood authors of our times. In this course, we will break some of the clichés which are stuck to Kafka´s life and work and dive into the fascinating, intricate and profoundly humorous world of his thoughts and emotions. We will try to find out, what were the possible sources of Kafka´s imagination and how did his art capture the general characteristics of modern men: the sense of isolation, the anxiety, the self-irony, the sense of responsibility and guilt, the quest for freedom, the struggle of an individual against a bureaucratic system? We will look at Kafka as one of the “Prague circle” writers but also in the broader context of artistic, philosophical and social ideas that swept across Europe before and after World War I. And we will question the writing itself: the urge, the need to write, writing as a way of survival. We will read selected works of Kafka, but also commentaries and parallel fictions by Walter Benjamin, Elias Canetti, Hannah Arendt, Milan Kundera, Václav Havel, and Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. This course aims to bring the students to a point from which they can find their own genuine and intimate understanding of Kafka´s writing.

Notes

Same as K20.9201.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CLI-UG1479 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Social Enterprising: Redefining Social Change in the 21st Century

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Martha Diaz

Description

Social entrepreneurs around the world are redefining the way we tackle social problems using effective business acumen and human capital. For these renegades, it is not business as usual, they are breaking out of the old corporate model and are developing new organizational patterns and markets. This course teaches the fundamentals of turning a powerful problem solving idea into a responsible enterprise with a blended social and financial value. From conducting research, community organizing, developing a business plan, crafting a viral marketing and fund raising campaign, and measuring impact, advance students will learn about the essential tools, practices and challenges to develop the capacity and sustainability for a social enterprise. Students are expected to develop and present a project proposal. Throughout the course scholars and leaders in the field are invited to share best practices and provide feedback to student projects. Readings include: Beyond Resistance! Youth Activism and Community Change: New Democratic Possibilities for Practice and Policy for America's Youth by Shawn Ginwright, Pedro Noguera, Julio Cammarota; How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas by David Bornstein; Selling Social Change (Without Selling Out): Earned Income Strategies for Nonprofits by Andy Robinson; Unmarketable: Brandilism, Copyfighting, Mocketing, and the Erosion of Integrity by Anne Elizabeth Moore; and, What Would Google Do? by Jeff Jarvis.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

ARTS-UG1405 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Drawing and Painting

4 units Fri
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Bert Katz

Description

This workshop is designed to provide both beginning and advanced students with studio experience in drawing and painting. The human figure will be the primary focus of this studio, although still life and other sources will also be used. A variety of drawing and painting media will be a part of the studio as well as discussions of required gallery and museum visits. An important part of this course will be the exploration of the problem of visual form and the development of mature aesthetic judgment. Students with extensive experience in painting or drawing, will have an opportunity to select their media in the studio. Selected work produced during the semester will be exhibited at the Gallatin School.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1207 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Origins of the Atomic Age

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Gene Cittadino

Description

The uranium and plutonium nuclear fission bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 permanently altered the world we live in. Fear of nuclear annihilation became a fact of life. Although the end of the Cold War relaxed the tensions somewhat, the combined arsenals of existing nuclear powers are still sufficient to destroy most of life on this planet many times over, and controversies continue over nuclear weapons programs in Iran and North Korea. How did this extraordinary state of affairs come about? Why were the bombs made when and where they were made? Why were they used? Did the individuals involved understand the destructive potential of these new weapons and ponder moral questions involving their manufacture and use? Did they anticipate the nuclear arms race that has resulted. How does this episode fit into the longer history of the relationship between science and warfare? How were both hopes and fears transferred to the debates over nuclear power? Readings will likely include Rhodes, The Making of the Atomic Bomb , Hachiya, Hiroshima Diary , Gordin, Red Cloud at Dawn , and a variety of selections concerning nuclear proliferation, the disarmament movement, and nuclear power.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1527 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Finance for Social Theorists

4 units Mon
7:45 PM - 10:15 PM
Peter Rajsingh

Description

Why are some private, profit-making institutions “too big to fail?” The objective of this course is to provide students with conceptual, interpretive and analytical tools to understand finance. The approach will be interdisciplinary and interpretive, drawing upon political theory, economics, psychology, basic statistics and accounting. For example, we will use the subprime crisis to explore core concepts associated with credit, banking, business ethics, monetary policy and macro economics. We will reference key ideas from familiar texts and also take up contemporary debates in finance. The aim is to help students become more literate and numerate as economic and social agents. Readings include Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations (excerpts); John Stuart Mill, Principles of Political Economy (excerpts); Georg Simmel, The Philosophy of Money ; Peter Bernstein, Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk ; Mohammed El-Erian, When Markets Collide ; and Nassim Taleb, Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in the Markets and in Life .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1588 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

The Rise and Fall of the Harlem Renaissance

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Myisha Priest

Description

Langston Hughes's question "What happens to a dream deferred?" is one of the most famous phrases to come from the Harlem Renaissance, yet it is a question rarely posed about the Harlem Renaissance itself. This class, therefore, will examine the dream of the Harlem Renaissance by tracing not only its appearance, but also the meaning of its failure. This course will explore the Harlem Renaissance as one of the most celebrated flowerings of culture in the history, and as a crucial articulation of America's dream. We will ask: how did Harlem Renaissance writers, artists, filmmakers, musicians, dancers (and more) use creative expression to depict, reject, and transform narratives of African American and American identity, to offer dreams of racial healing and national redemption? Because the Harlem Renaissance is an important and cherished signpost in America's narrative of struggle and redemption, however, it is rarely read as a dream deferred. So we also ask: how was the Harlem Renaissance a promise song for a future that never arrived, a dream of cultural change and social transformation never fully completed? Writers and artists who followed the Renaissance enunciate both sharp critiques and collective despair about the possibility of change. Speaking critically of the hopes of the Renaissance, writers like James Baldwin, Ann Petry and Richard Wright assert the failure of the its promise of racial rebirth and national reconciliation; depicting repetition not progress, they call for, seek and invent creative forms and strategies through which people can imagine themselves out of their tragic present. By studying the Renaissance as well as the dark imaginings that followed it, we will pursue broad questions about the centrality of racial identity to ideas of "Americanness," the centrality of narrative in of history, and the centrality of a fractured past to contemporary definitions of freedom. By tracing connections between an earlier but seminal cultural moment, and our own, we can undertake an important conversation about the meaning of race in this country.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG722 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

First-Year Research Seminar: Popular Religion and Popular Culture in North America

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Gregory Erickson

Description

American religion, historian Nathan Hatch writes, has “less to do with the specifics of polity and governance and more with the incarnation of the church into popular culture.” Although Hatch was writing about the 19th century, this complex relationship between the popular and the liturgical continues to shape and define America today. In this course, we will study and write about ways in which film, television, advertising, music, sports, politics, and the news media present, negotiate, and affect religious issues, and, conversely, how religion changes popular culture. We will “read” primary texts of popular religion and popular culture, such as Billy Graham sermons, Mormon pageants, Madonna videos, baseball and video games, as well as theoretical works by Jean Baudrillard, Elaine Graham, Peter Williams, Kate McCarthy, Eric Mazur, Susan Mizruchi, Richard Santana and Gregory Erickson. Students will be encouraged to explore topics of their own interest, and assignments will include reaction papers, various essay forms, and individual research projects.

Notes

Please note the following courses--- K10.0719, K10.0720, and K10.0722 --- are scheduled on the same day and time and periodically will meet together to discuss common themes on the topic of culture and ideology in the 20th century.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1644 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2011

Labor and the Global Market: Literature, Film and History

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Valerie Forman

Description

Globalization has become a much-debated and deeply controversial topic. In this class, we will focus on the ways that labor has been represented and understood, especially in relationship to the development of capitalism in its global form. In order to do so, we will explore how the movement of capital, commodities, and workers across the globe and with seeming indifference to national borders shapes the idea of work and those who perform it. Of equal importance in our study will be the way that work transforms the structure of the global economy. Some primary questions we will explore are: How has the demand for labor required migration and imposed geographical dislocations? How does labor create value within these new locations? How do some gain control of the work of others? How do workers organize themselves and develop community in new locations? How does this relationship of power change over time? Some likely texts for the course include: Shakespeare, The Tempest; Ngugi wa Thiong'o, I will Marry When I want; a Haitian novel about a sugar cane worker who migrates to the Dominican Republic; a French novel about Algerian auto workers in Paris on the eve of Algeria's independence; Toni Morrison, A Mercy; and Amitav Ghosh, Sea of Poppies. We will place these works of fiction in conversation with visual representations by Diego Rivera and others, works by Marx, by anthropologists and narrative filmmakers on sex tourism, and by documentary filmmakers and historians on global corporations and utopian economies.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1313 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Ethics for Dissenters

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bill Caspary

Description

This course is about dissent in a double sense: criticizing accepted ethical values, and criticizing old ways of philosophical thought about ethics. It is about affirmative ethics, not just criticism. Topics will grow from student questions and concerns, as well as the professor's. Suggested topics include viewpoints and skills to: (1) Criticize unjust ethical standards, e. g. sexist ones, and invent fair ones; (2) Choose ethical careers and life paths; (3) Recognize responsibilities to the larger community; (4) Resolve ethical dilemmas; (5) Justify visions of a better world; (6) Dialogue productively with adversaries; (7) Respect different ethical positions without "anything goes;" (8) Learn, and question, and still have principles; (9) Get beyond dead-end debate on idealism/realism, egotism/altruism, objectivism/relativism? (When is it justified to defeat adversies politically, as with civil rights laws? Is force justified, as in the American Civil War?) Readings from feminist, pragmatist, existentialist, ecological, nonviolence and conflict resolution, neo-classical, Marxist, and humanistic and developmental psychology approaches—as alternatives to mainstream Kantian and utilitarian ethics. Authors include de Beauvoir, Dewey, Emerson, Gandhi, Gilligan, James, Kohlberg, Marx, Maslow, Nietzsche, Nussbaum, Rogers, Sartre.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1314 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Literary and Cultural Theory: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Sara Murphy

Description

In this course, we will examine several questions that arise for students interested in the relation of theory to interdisciplinary study. What is theory essentially? How does it help us to develop approaches and shape questions for study? What are some influential theoretical schools and theoreticians? What do they say and how might they be related to one another? We will proceed through readings from Structuralism to Post-structuralism, focusing on language, feminism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction and interpretations of power and discourse. Authors considered may include Levi-Strauss, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Jacques Lacan, and Luce Irigaray.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1571 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Humans, Machines, and Aesthetics

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Myles Jackson

Description

This seminar proffers a glimpse into the historically contingent relationships between machines and humans from the Enlightenment through the Industrial Revolution to the twentieth century. We shall underscore the ways in which those interactions helped define aesthetics, particularly but not exclusively in music. In essence we hope to use machines and music to trace the history of creativity over the past three centuries. Immanuel Kant famously defined "genius" in his Third Critique as "a talent for producing something for which no determinate rule can be given, not a predisposition consisting of a skill for something that can be learned by following some rule or other; hence the foremost property of genius must be creativity." By this definition mimicry and imitation are the antitheses of the creative genius, while mechanical skill and machines were deemed inferior to it. During the later stages of the Industrial Revolution, however, there arose an aesthetic of mass production. Quantity—as Lenin would famously remark a century later—had a quality all its own, and a new aesthetics celebrated how an artifact could be perfectly copied thousands of times over, with unprecedented speed, precision, and efficiency. Central questions and debates follow from this development: How "creative," if at all, are machines? Are mechanical musical instruments superior to performers? How are humans different, if at all, from machines? Readings include Kant's Third Critique, Jackson's Harmonious Triads, Walter Benjamin's The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, Essinger's Jacquard's Web, Standage's The Turk, Riskin's (ed.), Genesis Redux, Katz's Capturing Sound, and Théberge's Any Sound You Can Imagine.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1375 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Romantics and Revolutionaries: The Birth of Modern Political Theatre

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Christopher Cartmill

Description

In the period of the American and French Revolutions, theater and theatricality took on powerful political significance. This course explores the convergence between theatre and politics during the Age of Revolution, while seeking parallels to the theatricality of our own political culture. Partly, we examine the historical conditions and cultural innovations that fueled writers and artists during this volatile and dynamic period between 1770 and 1850. Partly, we examine dramaturgy and theatre aesthetics exploring the links between history, and theories of drama, playwriting and stage practice, performance styles and critical reception. In addition to class discussions, students will be responsible for an extensive research project (paper and presentation). Course materials may include works by such figures as Voltaire, Rousseau, Sheridan, Blake, Schiller, Byron, Goethe, Stendhal, Robespierre, Washington, Pitt, and Paine; the music of Mozart and Beethoven; and the art of Piranesi, David, Ingres, and Delacroix.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1633 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Ecological Transport, Infrastructure and Building Design

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Mitchell Joachim

Description

The current environmental decline is a multifaceted predicament for our civilization. Previously, utopian projects have failed to reverse this ecological decay. This crisis demands robust solutions on a massive scale to deal with an immanent mega-urbanity. We will attempt to re-envision vehicles, infrastructure, and buildings to meet the ecological needs of the future. Students will consider questions such as: what is wrong with city systems today and what are the key environmental forces that shape them? Each student will individually critique and evaluate multiple engineered urban entities and subsequently prescribe new innovations. The objective will be to establish the most scientifically plausible designs for a new socio-ecological world. Readings, historical figures, and works for the course will include Janine M. Benyus, Ian McHarg, Richard T.T. Forman, John Todd, Anne Spirn, Geoffery Jellicoe, Jane Jacobs, Annie Leonard, Buckminster Fuller, William J. Mitchell, Mohsen Mostafavi, Ken Yeang, and others.

Notes

Same as V36.0300. Prerequisite V36.0100.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG712 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

First-Year Research Seminar: Art and the Dream Life

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Yevgeniya Traps

Description

What is the connection between sleeping and waking life, between dream visions and creativity? Are dreams prophetic or aesthetic? Do they fulfill desire or endlessly frustrate it? Do they reveal or conceal our truest selves? Taking these issues as our starting points, we will consider a variety of texts—scientific, religious, philosophical, literary, visual, and film, as well as our own dreams—as we explore the connections between sleep and aesthetics, between nightmares and trauma, between dreams and beauty. We will think too about the possibilities art offers for reconciling the many paradoxes of dreaming. Using writing as a way of thinking and reading critically, students will produce a dream journal, three analytical and literary critical essays, and a research paper. Readings may include works by Aristotle, Sigmund Freud, André Breton, Ralph Ellison, Jack Kerouac, Luis Borges, Lewis Carroll, Emily Dickinson, Anne Sexton, and Walt Whitman. We may also consider art by Surrealists, Dadaists and Kara Walker, as well as the films of Luis Buñuel, David Cronenberg, and Alfred Hitchcock.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

FIRST-UG729 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

First-Year Research Seminar: The Strange and the Familiar

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Lily Saint

Description

Even though we can travel further and faster than we used to be able to, much of what we learn about other places is still mediated through visual and written representations. This class examines how writers and artists depict the world beyond our immediate reaches, and in so doing, attempts to articulate a politics of representation. We will consider a variety of genres of representation—ethnographies, histories, political theory, literature, visual art, and theories of looking—to ask how to respond to strangeness, oddity, and the unknowable. Ideally, this class seeks to cultivate a way to render the strange familiar and the familiar strange. Assignments may include works by John Berger, Italo Calvino, J.M. Coetzee, Joseph Conrad, Alexis de Toqueville, Frantz Fanon, Yusef Komunyakaa, Claude Levi-Strauss, Pablo Picasso, Edward Said, Marjane Satrapi, and Susan Sontag.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1643 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Law and Legal Thought

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Vasuki Nesiah

Description

This class is aimed at introducing students to law and social theory through focused engagement with diverse areas of law - from property law to labor law. Paying particular attention to critical traditions in law and social thought in the United States, we will study legal realism, critical legal studies, critical race law and feminist legal studies. This course will examine the relationship between legal institutions and social justice from many different angles and try to develop critical tools with which to approach every day legal debates. How do different understandings of gender offer alternative trajectories for anti-discrimination law? What is the role of judges and courts in a democracy? In addition to reading legal scholars and social theorists, the course will also draw on films that reproduce or contest different understandings of law and society. Readings will include Roberto Unger, Duncan Kennedy, Michel Foucault, Martha Minow, Austin Sarat, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Karl Klare, John Locke, Margaret Radin, Joe Singer, Nancy Fraser, Richard Ford, Karl Marx and Patricia Williams.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1549 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Writers as Shapers: Strategies for Sculpting the Story

4 units Fri
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Meera Nair

Description

A piece of fiction can be constructed in an unlimited number of ways and each week we will explore the formal possibilities that are available to us. We will study the choices we can make as writers—of narrative point of view, beginnings, resolutions, dialogue, description, pacing, plot and character development. We will isolate and inspect strategies that published authors have used. Students will produce and workshop their own fiction from exercises. In the conversation between student writing and the studied literature there will hopefully be a greater sense of writers as shapers, sculptors of the raw material of story. Readings: Mishima, Ha Jin, Russell Banks, Charles Baxter, C.J. Hribal, Carver, Flannery O'Connor, Isaac Babel, George Saunders, James Joyce and others.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1573 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

The New American Society

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Laurin Raiken

Description

Until 2008 we took for granted that in the fifty years following World War II, the industrialized Western World experienced unprecedented economic expansion, and the United States was geopolitically the dominant superpower, indeed, the primary coordinator and beneficiary of the post World War II period. Only a few keen observers detected economic flaws or geopolitical vulnerability. Over the past two decades, however, new forms of violence, major economic shifts, and geopolitical reversals have seriously threatened world order. Recently, the self-destruction and breakdown of the U.S. financial system triggered a deep global destabilization and recession. To many, American life is becoming similar to the severe dislocations of the Great Depression. With this broad historical arc in view, this seminar offers a critical history of the Post World War II period, focusing especially on major social changes and world-historical economic collapse. Readings will include sociologists C. Wright Mills, Barrington Moore Jr. and Arthur J. Vidich; as well as economic thinkers as diverse as Milton Friedman, J.K Galbraith, Paul Krugman. Overall, our approach is influenced by the work of the great unsung American radical, Thorstein Veblen.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG726 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

First_Year Research Seminar: What is Terror? Literature and Critiques of Violence

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
A.B. Huber

Description

In this research seminar we will consider both the routine violence of everyday life—what Michael Taussig has called “terror as usual”—and also more monumental, episodic forms of state and organized violence. We will try to understand what comes to count as violence and why. We will also ask what literature can do that perhaps history or philosophy cannot to help us fathom or survive violence, and to better comprehend how violence travels, passes hands, and how it might be abated. This course works across disciplines and media but close attention to language, our own and others’, is at the heart our shared project. Readings will include essays by Hannah Arendt, Dave Eggers, Jamaica Kincaid, Joe Sacco, Edward Said, and others. Students will write short weekly response papers, and they will investigate and author a final research essay on a topic of their own choosing.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1513 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

New Deal Liberalism: Its Rise and Fall

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Steve Fraser

Description

This course will examine the rise and fall of New Deal liberalism as the dominant political and social order of mid- twentieth century America. It will begin with the onset of the Great Depression as the event which sets in motion profound transformations in the economy, in the balance of political power, in the role of the State, and in the relations between social classes and ethnic/racial groups. It will explore the rise of the labor movement and the creation of the welfare state. It will analyze the impact of the Cold War on domestic politics. Discussions will probe the emergence of the civil rights, anti-war, and counter-culture movements. The class will analyze the conservative reaction against the New Deal culminating in the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980. Students will analyze primary documents, novels, and films such as the Grapes of Wrath and Dr. Strangelove , as well as read secondary works including Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal by William E. Leuchtenberg, America in Our Time by Godfrey Hodgson, and Coming of Age in Mississippi by Anne Moody.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include "Creating a Magazine," "Dante's Literary and Historical Background," and "Environmental Design." Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Wednesday, December 1.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

IDSEM-UG1294 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Philosophy of Medicine

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bradley Lewis

Description

Most medical inquiry focuses on narrow issues of disease from within a biomedical framework. It rarely steps back from the particulars to ask larger philosophic questions regarding the goals of medicine and healthcare. In this class we take the opposite strategy to focus on the larger theoretical and philosophical issues in U.S. healthcare. We unpack the underlying concepts and principles that organize contemporary medical research, practice, and education. We look at the strengths and weaknesses of today’s dominant models of medicine and we consider the possibilities of alternative conceptual frames. Plus, we consider how much of the administrative and financial problems of today’s healthcare crisis can be explained by conceptual and philosophical issues. Our inquiry will be an interdisciplinary approach that draws from medicine, philosophy, history, anthropology, sociology, gender studies, disability studies, cultural studies, poetry, drama, and documentary.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1573 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Writing for the Screen II

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Selma Thompson

Description

"Writing For The Screen II" provides a structured workshop environment in which students who have already completed a first draft of a feature-length screenplay can assess their work and take their writing to the next level by completing a second draft and a polish. Can the script be edited to improve pace and structure? Can the story be made more active and visual? Can more be done with character choices and setting? Are there ideas, themes, and/or jokes to further explore? Are there issues of story logic or continuity yet to be worked out? Is the story presented professionally, creatively using screenplay format to engage the reader? What elements make the script commercially viable and how might it be pitched? Writing a second draft is a creative adventure, a chance to see how far you can take your initial idea as your story grows richer and your characters start to come alive on the page. Texts will include Russin and Downs, Writing the Picture; Mamet, Bambi vs. Godzilla: The Nature, Purpose, and Practice of the Movie Business; Goldman, Adventures in the Screen Trade; Lowenstein, My First Movie: 20 Celebrated Directors Talk about Their First Film; and the screenplays for Chinatown and Ordinary People.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1012 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Acting: Rehearsing the Play

4 units Mon
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Ben Steinfeld

Description

This class will approach acting from the belief that an actor's job is learning how to rehearse. During the semester we will investigate what makes for joyful, effective, and exciting rehearsal, striving to develop a process that is as powerful as any performance. How do we make the events of the play happen "in the room"? How do we take responsibility for what our character says and does from the first read-through? How do we connect with poetic or complicated language? How do we speak and listen from the same "place"? What is the purpose of "table work"? How do we make authentic physical choices? As we pursue these questions, we will engage with several of the actor's technical and artistic challenges and focus on developing the acting instrument through voice and speech, physicality, and style work. We will begin with Shakespearean monologues to build a common vocabulary, and move to modern and contemporary scene work that will culminate in a public presentation—giving each student the chance to share his/her work with an audience. Students must wear appropriate rehearsal clothes and will be asked to rehearse outside of class time.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

WRTNG-UG1560 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

The Art and Craft of Poetry

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Emily Fragos

Description

In this workshop poets will focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer’s process. A weekly reading of a poem by each poet in the circle will serve as point of departure for discussion of the relationships of craft and expression. Each student will also briefly present a favorite poet/poem for the enjoyment and learning of the class. A final portfolio of poems is required at the end of the course.

Notes

Students may take "Advanced Art and Craft of Poetry" two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

ARTS-UG1440 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Technology, Art, and Public Space

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Terence Culver

Description

This course explores the relationship of art, technology, and public space through the study of historical and contemporary examples, and through our own direct experience of creating and installing a work of public art. Special emphasis will be placed on the impact of recent technological developments on public art, but in turn, we use public art to reflect on emergent cultural and social transformations in New York City. The course will focus especially on the evolution of both Times Square and Union Square in New York City, to understand how art, commerce, politics, and public life have competed and converged to influence social and political change over the years. But the experiential component of the course is a technology-based public art project (most likely involving large-scale digital media) that students will plan and execute. The project will most likely utilize large-scale digital media, and the instructor will secure the necessary funds to carry it out. Students will keep a journal for the duration of the project, which will be used to evaluate the project and to connect it to other coursework. Readings for the course will be drawn from a number of sources, including: Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space; Rosalyn Deutsche, Evictions: Art and Spatial Politics; Barbara Goldstein, Barbara. Public Art By The Book; Hayden, Dolores. The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History; Bruno Latour, (Editor), Making Things Public: Atmospheres of Democracy; Malcolm Miles, Art, Space, and the City: Public Art and Urban Futures; Jacques Rancier, Jacques. The Future of the Image.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1342 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Language, Globalization and the Self

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Maria-Luisa Achino-Loeb

Description

This course is intended as an exploration of language as vehicle for processes of globalization. What role did language play in the changes wrought by early capitalist transformations and the colonial expansion? Conversely, how have these global changes affected localized communities and the languages that identify them? And why should we care? To answer these questions we will examine how the colonial experience has given rise to value-laden linguistic practices that mirror and sustain the racializing of privilege; and how the experience of language-loss encountered by voluntary and involuntary migrants can attack the integrity of the self. While ultimately concerned with language, our discussions will have a wide scope ranging from issues of political economy to collective consciousness and individual psychology. Readings will include Achino-Loeb's Silence: The Currency of Power, Anderson's Imagined Communities, Wolf's Europe and the People Without History, Hoffman's Lost in Translation, Dangarembga's Nervous Conditions, as well as selected excerpts from Edward Sapir's Culture, Language and Personality and Jameson and Miyoshi's The Cultures of Globalization.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG1905 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Senior Project

4 units

Description

The senior project is a 4-credit independent research or artistic project that a student pursues under the guidance of a faculty mentor generally in the final semester before graduation. In some cases, a student may choose to do a senior project in his/her penultimate semester and draw that project into the senior colloquium discussion. Senior projects may include, but are not limited to, a paper based on original research, a written assessment of a community-learning initiative, an artistic project such as a film or novel, etc. Successful completion of the senior project will be noted in two ways: the student will receive a letter grade for the course titled, “Senior Project,” and upon graduation a notation will appear on the transcript listing the title of the senior project. Senior projects deemed exceptional by the Gallatin Senior Project Committee will be awarded honors.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Wednesday, December 1.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1589 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2011

The Vietnam War

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Hannah Gurman

Description

The Vietnam War occupies a special place in U.S history and foreign relations. It was America's longest war, the only war it ever lost, a war that shattered Americans' faith in their government and spawned a culture of protests that divided one generation from another. It has been said that Vietnam was the "most traumatic experience for the United States in the twentieth century." In this course, we will examine the Vietnam War through the lens of literature, film, official documents, memoirs, and historical analysis, under the premise that each of these sources offers different, yet important insights into the cause, experience, and effect of the war. In addition to considering the war from the U.S. perspective, we will also read texts that offer insights into the Vietnamese experience. Texts will include novels, films, and poetry of Eugene Burdick, Norman Mailer, Yusef Komunyaaka, and Tim O’Brien, official documents written by Robert McNamara, George Ball, and Daniel Ellsberg, and scholarship by Leslie Gelb, David Elliott, and Marilyn Young.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1480 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Photograph New York, Create Your Vision

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Jeff Day

Description

By giving us a sense of place, the city we inhabit recreates us. This documentary photography course explores New York City as the ever-changing environment in which we are involved. Embarking on a photographic project of their design, students will depict a highly visible urban space (viewed as a world financial, cultural, artistic capital) through their own relationship to it: their ways of interacting, acting, and being moved. Classes prepare students to work on their position as photographers: as they make pictures in the streets of New York, they will determine their own perception (vantage point, angle, point of view, framing) and establish a particular relationship with the audience (through scale, rhythm sequence, position, color). Exploring the boundaries between public and private space, feeling space and scale with the body (and not only with one's eyes) and creating a personal color palette will be strongly encouraged. Students will also explore a photographer's power to change audience perception, for example, through large scale installations inciting viewers to inhabit particular vantage points. Though documentary imagery is traditionally considered to establish a transparent relation to 'reality,' this course challenges students to recognize its created character and to recreate the city by influencing with their photographic intervention the ways it is perceived. Classes will offer technical instruction, critiques of student work, debates on street photography, visual analysis and discussions with invited artists, and will be highly collaborative. Open to highly motivated students with or without experience in documentary photography; digital or film cameras welcome.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1306 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Advanced Contemporary Musicianship

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
John Castellano

Description

This course is designed for those who want to learn how to make music together with others. The course work combines a study of contemporary popular music, in terms of form, style, and instrumentation, with a review of practical music theory and the development of functional musicianship skills. Students have the opportunity to apply what they have studied by performing in class on their own compositions as well as on compositions written by their classmates and the course instructor. In addition, each student will write and bring in for class discussion, a short paper on a musical topic of special interest to them. This course is appropriate for any student interested in furthering their understanding of music in general and contemporary popular music specifically. Access to a keyboard or guitar is recommended. The workshop meets in a professional, fully equipped, music studio where students have access to a wide variety of musical instruments. [$35 fee]

Notes

Lab fee: $35. Course meets at Drummer's Collective, 123 West 18th Street.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

CORE-GG2340 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master’s Thesis and Defense, K70.2335, are required to register for Thesis Advisement (1 credit) each semester (including the summer, if you plan on graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. This 1-credit course is not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master’s degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ARTS-UG1621 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Architectural Design and Drawing

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Donna Goodman

Description

Gropius once described architecture as a combination of "form, function, and delight." In this workshop, students are introduced to the experience of designing buildings. The first project is an exploration of the design process. Students create sketchbooks of diagrams and drawings, analyzing issues of form, function, technology, site, and environment. Drafting techniques are also presented through preparation of plans, sections, elevations, and renderings. In the second project, students design a residential loft. They begin with a program and a basic design concept. Planning theories, such as function, circulation, massing, and spatial organization are discussed. Visual concepts, such as symmetry, axis, and proportion are also introduced. Methods for developing designs through models, perspectives, and isometric drawings are also presented. Prior drafting experience is helpful, but not required.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1460 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Visual Arts in Theory to Practice

4 units Tue
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Keith Miller

Description

This course is open to students actively engaged in art practice (photographic, painterly, sculptural, videographic, or otherwise) and interested in developing a theoretical framework for their work. We will begin by developing a common vocabulary. Then through texts, museum, gallery and studio visits as well as studio practice, students will be challenged to define what they believe to be the place of art in contemporary society and, more specifically, where they believe their work fits within this context. Ultimately, the goal of the class will be the development of a work or a body of work that will be critiqued in group discussion and individually, and will be addressed on theoretical, formal, and technical grounds.

Notes

Permission of instructor required (km96@nyu.edu).

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1116 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2011

Fate and Free Will in the Epic Tradition

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Antonio Rutigliano

Description

The role of the gods in human affairs inevitably raises the question of fate and free will. The epics, from the ancient world to the Renaissance, frequently reflect and define this debate. This course examines how the epics of Homer, Vergil, Dante and Milton not only mirror the philosophical and theological perceptions of the period, but sometimes forecast future debates on the issue. Readings may include the Epic of Gilgamesh, Iliad or Odyssey, Aeneid, and Divine Comedy, as well as selections from Plato's Protagoras or Aristotle's Ethics, Cicero's De Fato, Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy, and Fromm's Escape From Freedom.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1568 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2011

Narrating Memory, History and Place

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Marie Cruz Soto

Description

This course examines how people imagine a place of their own through narrations of the past. The past, after all, is a contested terrain open to divergent interpretations that shape common understandings of places. The meanings bestowed on places dictate who can use them, and how. Thus, the ways through which people narrate the past can transform places. This course, therefore, explores the broad interplay between narrations of memory, history and place. It focuses, however, on the politics of historical narrations in struggles of disempowered communities to claim a place of their own. Course readings include literary and other scholarly texts like Jamaica Kincaid’s A Small Place, Michel-Rolph Trouillot’s Silencing the Past and Michel De Certeau’s The Practice of Everyday Life as well as writings by Edward Said, William Cronon, Diana Taylor, Steven Hoelscher and Doreen Massey.

Notes

Formerly titled "Narrating the Americas: History and Film."

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1106 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

The Knowing Body: Awareness Techniques for Performers

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Robin Powell

Description

Mind/body awareness techniques increase one's ability to strip away any physical and mental interferences which often appear as stiff, held muscles, poor body habits and impaired concentration. These methods are vital to the creative process and help students to honor inner knowledge. In this workshop, performance will be viewed in terms of concentration, breath, tension/effort, energy/presence, body behaviors/habits, and mind/body integration. Students must be prepared to perform a solo piece of their chosing (or an activity to be observed) by the third week of class and work on it throughout the semester. Kinetic Awareness, the Alexander Technique, meditation, visualization, and energy work will be learned and applied to student's performance piece. Open to performing arts students who wish to deepen their relationship to their bodies, increase awareness, and draw on inner reserves. Readings will include Knaster's Discovering the Body's Wisdom, Steinman's The Knowing Body, Crow's The Alexander Technique as a Basic Approach to Theatrical Training, and Kohnlein's Listening from the Physical Body.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1451 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Ancient Reflections in a Time of Modern War

2 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Laura Slatkin

Description

In this class we will explore ancient Greek attitudes toward war, as represented in epic, drama, and historiography. Among the topics we will consider are: rhetoric and rationales for and against war; war and social cohesion; war and empire; the stakes of civil war; war and gender; the social costs of war; the implications for our contemporary situation. Readings may include, Homer, Iliad ; Aeschylus Seven Against Thebes ; Euripides, Iphigeneia in Aulis and Trojan Women ; Aristophanes, Peace ; Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War ; and 20th century mediations on the problematic of war, such as Elaine Scarry, The Body in Pain ; Jonathan Shay, Achilles in Vietnam ; Simone Weil, The Iliad , or the poem of force.

Notes

Course meets 1/26 - 3/9 only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1519 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Biology and Society

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Myles Jackson

Description

Perhaps the most recent ethical challenge faced by all of us is biotechnology. This seminar explores the relationship between the biological sciences and society in the U.S. throughout the twentieth century. We will examine how debates concerning "nature versus nurture" have been framed historically. We shall discuss the history of eugenics and investigate how the U.S. government saw eugenics as proffering an objective tool for testing immigration and sterilization policies. We shall ask if there is a link between eugenics and the Human Genome Project. How has the patenting of human and plant genes reshaped the conduct of scientific research? How is molecular biology challenging notions of race? How much of human behavior is shaped by genes, and how does that affect issues concerning free will and culpability? Is it ethical for developing countries to use genetically modified crops rather than their own sustainable practices? How has the HIV/AIDS epidemic reshaped the historical notions of the doctor-patient relationship and objectivity of drug testing? This course aims at drawing attention to the ethical, legal, and social issues generated by biology over the past century. Readings will include works from twentieth-century politicians such as Teddy Roosevelt, eugenicists, including Charles Davenport, the historian of science Dan Kevles, the philosopher of science Michael Ruse, the sociologist and historian of medicine Steven Epstein, the sociologist of race Troy Duster, and intellectual property lawyers such as Rebecca Eisenberg, as well as recent works by molecular biologists and geneticists on the definition of race, the role of patenting in biotechnology, and how commercial interests are driving scientific research.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CORE-GG2225 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Master's Thesis Seminar

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Bella Mirabella

Description

This course engages students in the conceptual and technical processes leading to a thesis: articulating a core problem, reviewing appropriate literatures, designing effective methods, and constructing persuasive analyses. Through discussions of both published research articles and student work, the seminar examines the conventions of scholarly discourse, strategies of analysis and argumentation, and the ways in which writing can serve as a means to discover ideas. Students also learn academic writing skills; the conventions of scholarly discourse; strategies for building arguments; and the use of writing to explore ideas. Sections of the course focus on different thesis formats (research, artistic, project), but all take the student to the stage of preparing a thesis proposal.

Notes

pass/fail only. sec. 1 for the artistic thesis; sec. 2 for the research or project thesis.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2225 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Master's Thesis Seminar

4 units
Section 002
Thu
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Meredith Theeman

Description

This course engages students in the conceptual and technical processes leading to a thesis: articulating a core problem, reviewing appropriate literatures, designing effective methods, and constructing persuasive analyses. Through discussions of both published research articles and student work, the seminar examines the conventions of scholarly discourse, strategies of analysis and argumentation, and the ways in which writing can serve as a means to discover ideas. Students also learn academic writing skills; the conventions of scholarly discourse; strategies for building arguments; and the use of writing to explore ideas. Sections of the course focus on different thesis formats (research, artistic, project), but all take the student to the stage of preparing a thesis proposal.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1593 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2011

Barbarians: Ancient Conceptions of the Outsider

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Hallie Franks

Description

The conceptions of people outside of one's own culture are complex and multi-layered, and this was as true in the ancient world as it is today. From the conquered Elamites that were depicted on the palace walls of the Neo-Assyrian Assurbanipal, to the mythical Ethiopians of Homer's epics, or to the Gauls with whom Julius Caesar did battle, representations of other kinds of people serve as a backdrop against which a distinctive sense of cultural identity is clarified or reinforced. This seminar explores the representation of "foreign" peoples in the visual arts and literature of the ancient Near Eastern, Greek, and Roman worlds. Using visual (reliefs, vase-painting, sculpture, mosaics, and wall-painting) and written (inscriptions, epic poetry, drama, histories, novels) sources, we pursue the following questions: What role do local ideals play in the construction and definition of another culture? What are the political or social motivations for the representations of foreigners in ancient art and literature? To what extent does the definition of an "other" reflect an already defined identity, and to what extent is identity constituted by imagining difference? Readings may include Simone de Beauvoir, Clifford Geertz, Euripides Medea, Aeschylus The Persians, Herodotus, Caesar The Gallic Wars, Heliodorus Aethiopika (The Ethiopian Romance).

Notes

Formerly titled "Cultural Others in the Ancient World."

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1555 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Advanced Fiction Writing

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Chris Spain

Description

The aim of this course is to fathom why fiction works when it works, and why it doesn’t when it doesn’t. We will attempt to teach ourselves to read like writers, so we can learn from those who have come before, so we can began to write like writers. We will engage all the elements that give a fiction a chance at success--obsession, seduction, evoking of the senses, the removal of filters, scene and summary, theatre of the mind, et cetera. Students--and the teacher--will turn in three first drafts of fiction, each 10-14 pages long, to be critiqued in a workshop setting. The critiques will be rigorous but constructive; no nastiness allowed. We will also complete short, extemporaneous, writing exercises. Readings taken from The New Yorker, Zoetrope , and others.

Notes

Prerequisite K30.1550 or V39.0815 or V39.0816 or V39.0820 or permission of the instructor. Students may take "Advanced Fiction Writing" two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1590 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Walter Benjamin: Theory for Gleaners

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
A.B. Huber

Description

Long before the current vogue for eco-living, recycling, and repurposing, there have been people surviving with little fanfare on leftovers and discards, and theorists meditating on the revolutionary possibilities of refuse and junk. This seminar will introduce students to the work of Walter Benjamin, who is both a central figure in critical theory and an early, powerful commentator on the politics and aesthetics of the cast-off. We begin the course with Agnes Varda's film The Gleaners and I, and we will continue to explore the relation between theory and the collecting and recycling of ideas, images, and objects, especially those that have been overlooked or abandoned. What, if anything, do ragpickers or dumpster divers have to teach us about subjects as large as theory, history, modernity, and the city? Our primary text will be Benjamin's expansive and unfinished work of citations and brief commentaries, The Arcades Project (1927-1940), but we will consider the work of other 19th and 20th century collectors and archivists. Texts include the poems of Baudelaire and Aragon, the theory of Freud, the short stories of Walser, the photographs of Blossfeldt and Atget, the Mnemosyne-Atlas of Warburg. What did Benjamin and these moderns make of dross, and what can we glean from their thought for our own times?

Notes

Same as V29.0117.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1316 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Telling Truths: The Skill of Autobiography

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Susan Weisser

Description

How can one tell the "truth" about one's life in narrative form? In this course we will explore the pleasures and dangers of telling stories about our lives through writing autobiographical essays, as well as through reading the autobiographies of selected others. Readings may include texts by Janet Frame, Nancy Mairs, Mary Karr, and David Sedaris. We will analyze the way in which self-narrative is constructed from the tangled materials of real life, how we read and understand the life writing of others, and how the stories of others can influence our own. Topics include authenticity, memory, identity, voice, point of view, and relationships.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

FIRST-UG719 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

First-Year Research Seminar: The Writer in International Conflicts

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Hannah Gurman

Description

In this course, we will explore how U.S. novelists, journalists, and government officials have used writing to intervene in contemporary international conflicts. What role has writing played in shaping the understanding or outcome of these conflicts? What is the relationship between writing and politics in these texts? How does the position of the writer in these works shed light on problems of rationality, subjectivity, and sympathy in contemporary international conflict? In addition to reading novels, memoirs, and scholarship that responded to or became implicated in the Cold War and Islamist jihad, we will explore the role of human rights journalism in stopping recent genocides, as well as the writings of presidential advisors and speechwriters who helped formulate international policies of the Cold War and the War on Terror. Readings may include Norman Mailer, Susan Sontag, Mary McCarthy, George Kennan, Hannah Arendt, and Susan Moeller. These texts will be the focus of several critical essays that students will write over the course of the semester, culminating in a final research paper on a topic selected by the student.

Notes

Please note the following courses--- K10.0719, K10.0720, and K10.0722 --- are scheduled on the same day and time and periodically will meet together to discuss common themes on the topic of culture and ideology in the 20th century.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

WRTNG-UG1536 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

The Short Story: A Workshop on Revising

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Carol Zoref

Description

This workshop is dedicated to the oft-repeated observation that all writing is re-writing. Each writer will focus their efforts on only one or two short stories, rather than starting many new stories and abandoning them in favor of yet another new beginning. Students will take each of their stories through a number of drafts and revise them in response to (though not necessarily in accord with) questions and comments raised by other members of the workshop. The objective is to learn ways of staying with such challenges as maintaining the story's voice, determining the order of experience, and arriving at an ending that satisfies the design of the story as well as the intentions of the writer. Workshop members share their stories in class throughout the semester and comment in detail on one another's work. Participants should have some experience writing short stories.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel , MacCannell’s The Tourist, and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: www.travel-studies.com.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

ARTS-UG1050 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Performing Stories: East Meets West

4 units Wed
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Lanny Harrison

Description

In this course we will create characters inspired by history, memory, dreams and world lore through challenging exercises that fuse Eastern contemplative traditions and Western theatrical improvisation. Students will learn how to access different aspects of themselves to enhance their own creative process and create a uniquely authentic theatre. Each session will begin with vocal exercises and physical warm ups, based on Taoist exercises and Western dance techniques. Our character work starts with meditations and visualizations employing the Buddhist tradition of "mindfulness/awareness" practice, in which we place ourselves totally in the present moment. We will work in solos, duos and groups, gradually adding costumes, props and music. Open to theater students, dancers, musicians, visual artists, writers—all those interested in discovering their own source of deep invention. Readings will include Chögyam Trungpa's Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior and Dharma Art , Louise Steinman's The Knowing Body , Ethan Nichtern's One City and John Welwood's Ordinary Magic .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

CLI-UG1464 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Shifting Focus II: Video Production and Community Activism

4 units Mon
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Mark Read

Description

In Shifting Focus II, students will focus on the concrete tasks associated with video production and distribution, while at the same time investigating recent theoretical work relating to the impact of social networks on political organizing and how web 2.0 technologies alter the dynamics of video distribution. New tools and an ever changing technological environment call for a radical re-thinking of how video is, and can be, used within the context of community organizing, and yet the basic rules for how to make powerful, influential work remain mostly the same. In this course students will hone their craft as young media makers, while at the same time become web 2.0 strategists on how to deploy the media they make.

Notes

Prerequisite K45.1445 or the equivalent (demonstrable video production and editing skills);Permission of the instructor (akawildman@gmail.com) required for all others.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

IDSEM-UG1626 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

The Communication Revolutions

4 units Wed
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Paul Thaler

Description

We say we live in the Information Age as if such an age never existed before. But throughout time, the introduction of new forms of media and communication technologies have had a transformational effect on existing social, political, and economic life, creating new perceptual pathways to our understanding. This course examines history through the prism of these communication “revolutions,” beginning with the arrival of the spoken word, the development of writing systems, the spread of the printed word, the age of electricity, before focusing on the modern era of digital media. It is through our investigation of these previous revolutions that we may come to some greater understanding about the promise, and consequence, of our own technological age. Possible readings: Jay David Bolter, Turing’s Man: Western Culture in the Computer Age ; James Carey, Culture as Communication ; Elizabeth Eisenstein, The Printing Press as an Agent of Change ; Eric Havelock, Preface to Plato ; Marshall McLuhan, Gutenberg Galaxy ; Lewis Mumford. Technics and Civilization ; Walter Ong, Orality and Literacy ; Susan Sontag, On Photography; Neil Postman, Technopoly ; and Sherry Turkle, The Second Screen .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1300 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Militaries and Militarization

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Antonio Lauria-Perricelli

Description

What are the effects of a large, permanent military upon the political economy and society of the United States? What are the effects on other countries of their militaries? What are the effects on local societies of US military bases? What is the role of the various militaries in the history of colonial/neo-colonial control, and in contemporary empire? How are military establishments and violence linked to ethno-national, class and other social movements—and to the repression and domination of such movements? What does a military do to/for the people who staff it? What are the implications of militarization in such areas as gender, human rights, the environment, sports, knowledge and learning? What is the role of militias, “para-militaries”, and guerrillas? What methods can social or popular movements use in their attempts to subvert, paralyze, eliminate or otherwise struggle against militaries, military bases, and weapons? Texts may include: Lutz, Homefront: A Military City and the American Twentieth Century ; Enloe, Maneuvers: The International Politics of Militarizing Women’s Lives ; McCaffrey, Military Power and Popular Protest:  The U.S. Navy in  Vieques, Puerto Rico ; and Green, Fear as a Way of Life .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG727 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

First-Year Research Seminar: Sense and Consensus

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Chinnie Ding

Description

Blink. Sniff. Tickle. Eavesdrop. Slurp. We experience the world through our senses. To make sense of what we sense is to navigate between feeling and knowing, immediacy and otherness, idiosyncrasy and consensus. Whether deprivation or overload, sensory experience at once invites description and eludes understanding, challenging writers and scientists alike. This class explores the mechanics as well as the poetics of perception. Students develop individual research topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as literature, music, philosophy, neuroscience, art, and mysticism. Color, pain, noise, metaphor, synesthesia, umami, the sublime, phantom limbs, and "non-lethal" weaponry will be some phenomena we look into. Readings may include works by Marcel Proust, John Cage, Isadora Duncan, Vladimir Nabokov, Oliver Sacks, Emily Dickinson, Michael Pollan, Diane Ackerman, and others. Films and field trips will supplement the readings.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

WRTNG-UG1075 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

The Montage is the Message

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Luke Mitchell

Description

A man smiles, a shot is fired, he frowns. No: A man frowns, a shot is fired, he smiles. The sequence tells all. The order of scenes conveys more meaning even than the scenes themselves. In this class, students will draw from film theory to learn how to better structure their non-fiction narratives. We will explore how, in writing non-fiction, we make choices about what to describe and how to arrange those descriptions; and in making these choices, we begin (whether we intend it or not) to make an argument. In our examination of the theory of montage in non-fiction writing, students will analyze film sequences from Eisenstein, Alfred Hitchcock, and David Simon, and texts by literary journalists Lawrence Weschler, Ian Frazier, Joan Didion, Frederick Kaufman, and Cecilia Balli, among others. The real breakthroughs, though, will occur as students set about assembling and reassembling their own works.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1635 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Playing Video Games: Theory, History and Practice

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Samuel Tobin

Description

Video games are an increasingly ubiquitous form of media, but what are they, how do they work and who plays them? And what can we learn from them, about them and through them? In this course we will explore the histories of video games as well as the key ways in which video games, games in general and play have been theorized in the humanities and social sciences. One of the central questions theorists of play have is exactly how do we define play and how does it relate to games, work, war, sociability, learning and other key concepts. We will read and discuss a broad range of texts about play and about video games from authors including Johan Huizinga, Roger Caillois, Clifford Geertz, David Sudnow, Jesper Juul and McKenzie Wark. We will also play with a range of games, old and new, both in and out of class. No special video game systems, experience or equipment is required.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CORE-GG2335 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Master's Thesis and Defense

3 units Wed
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Julie Malnig

Description

Students registering for this course meet in the beginning of the semester with the thesis reviewer to discuss the procedures for organizing and presenting the thesis. It then becomes an independent project with the student's adviser to complete the thesis. Students are required to register for Thesis and Defense when they have completed 37 credits in the M.A. program. This course is required for completion of the master's degree program.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1339 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Foucault: Biopolitics and the Care of the Self

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bradley Lewis

Description

Michel Foucault’s radical approach to the body destabilized rigid distinctions between biology and culture, and it anticipated a new form of "bio-politics." These approaches were first used by ACT-UP (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) and have gone on to influence feminist theory of the body, disability studies, queer theory, and postanarchy. Each of these forms of theory and activism have in common a focus on the dense intertwining of knowledge (science/reason), power, desire, subjectivity, and disciplinary control. We devote this class to close readings of Foucault’s work. Our focus will be on his key notions of discourse, power, biopower, discipline, subjectivity, and sexuality. In addition, we explore the ways Foucault’s theories and concepts became synergistic with AIDS activism and, more recently, with emergent trends in post-anarchicism.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, January 28.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

IDSEM-UG1563 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Women’s Text(iles)

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Myisha Priest

Description

Textile arts have been so firmly linked with women’s writing that one of the central metaphors of women’s writing traditions has become the metaphor of the quilt. This course will explore this metaphor that proposes the making of beautiful, functional wholes out of fragments and scraps, using it to explore the cultural work of African American women and illuminate connections between writers and artists. This rich intersection of writing and art will allow us to consider broader questions about power; we will investigate the ways in which the written works and textiles articulate, challenge and transform representations of race, gender, sexuality, as well as the meanings of art. This course will take us out into the city, where we will view the textile creations of Black women artists like Faith Ringgold, Brenda Amina Robinson and Carrie Mae Weems at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim, the American Craft Museum, and the Museum of Folk Art. Written texts may include: Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Gloria Naylor, Mama Day; Faith Ringgold, Tar Beach; Ntozake Shange, Sassafras, Cypress and Indigo. We will also participate in a quilt-making workshop, where each student will create his or her own textile interpretation of the major issues of the course.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1624 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

There and Back Again: Travelers and Traveling through the Middle Ages and Beyond

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Andrew Romig

Description

The image of the medieval world as dark, backward, and stagnant has for too long held sway over our modern popular conceptions of the era. In this course, we will investigate the ways in which the Middle Ages were actually a period of vast movement, migration, and pilgrimage. We will study the “discovery” of North America by Scandinavian sailors five centuries before Columbus. We will explore the colonization of the New World by European powers in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. And throughout, we will ask how we can better understand the history of identity formation, orientalism, and imperialism in the pre-modern era. We will delve into the questions, the conflicts, and the painful changes that these travels and encounters fomented both within European society and without. Readings may include the Confessio of St. Patrick, Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People , The Thousand and One Nights , the Saga of Eirik the Red , Marco Polo’s Division of the World , Mandeville’s Travels , Dante’s Divine Comedy , Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales , Christine de Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies , More’s Utopia , Bartolomé de las Casas’ Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies , and Françoise de Graffigny’s Letters from a Peruvian Woman .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG1801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work an average of 10 to 20 hours each week at the site and meet regularly during the semester with their faculty adviser to discuss the internship. For each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship, students are expected to attend two workshops about internships; keep a journal of their daily internship experiences; submit a progress report describing the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, January 28. Students registering for an Internship are required to attend one session of each workshop: Workshop I: 2/7, 10:00 am-11:00 am, or 2/8, 12:30 pm-1:30 pm
 Workshop II: 3/7, 10:00 am-11:00 am, or 3/8, 12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

WRTNG-UG1350 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Writing for Young Readers

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
June Foley

Description

This course guides students in writing fiction for readers age ten through adolescence. While writing, workshopping, and revising, students consider both theoretical and practical issues of writing for young people. We explore the history of children's literature and examine the academic journal Children's Literature , the newsletter of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, the American Library Association's Newbery Awards and various bestseller lists. We also read and write in response to exemplary works in a variety of forms: Lois Lowry’s Anastasia Krupnik (a comic, episodic novel for tweens); Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime (a "crossover" book for adolescents and adults), Sherman Alexie's The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (a fictionalized memoir), Suzanne Collins’s The Hunger Games (the first volume of the dystopic trilogy), David Levithan’s Love Is the Highest Law (a post-9/11 narrative from three points of view), and (former Gallatin teacher) E. Lockhart's The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks (a realistic novel). Students read their work aloud in a workshop format. The course culminates in each student’s writing 20 pages of a work for young readers, along with an outline and a query letter for agents or editors. A guest speaker or two—writer and/or editor—will visit.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1516 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Understanding the Universe

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Matthew Stanley

Description

This class is an interdisciplinary exploration of how humans have tried to understand the universe. We begin with the first Greek attempts to make sense of the universe, discuss the “Scientific Revolution,” through to modern Big Bang theory. Themes include the interaction of astronomy, physics, and philosophy necessary for talking about the cosmos, and how scientists came to accept that the universe changes and develops over time. We discuss the history of how scientists came to understand the nature of stars, galaxies, black holes, extra-terrestrial life, and the apparent “fine tuning” of the laws of nature. Special attention is paid to the problem of how we can talk scientifically about things we can never experiment on or reproduce. We will examine not just ideas about the universe (what is it? where did it come from? and so on), but also the methods used to arrive at those conclusions (observations and theories), literary and visual representations of the universe, and larger philosophical issues (why are we here?). Readings may include: Aristotle, Copernicus, Newton, Kant, Einstein.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1115 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Creative Arts in the Helping Professions

4 units Thu
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Maria Hodermarska

Description

This workshop explores the uses of drama, dance, visual arts, music and poetry within the health care professions, serving children to geriatric populations. Against a theoretical background of the psychological needs of mentally and physically ill individuals, the creative processes of the arts are experienced as they can humanize, sensitize, ameliorate, and liberate expressive capacities. Activities drawn from each art form are tried out, sometimes blended, and adapted for diverse age groups and needs. The workshop provides substantial background for artists, artist-educators, leisure studies majors, as well as others interested in exploring an ancillary or major career in the arts therapies. Employment possibilities are discussed, as well as professional organizations and registry requirements for further in-depth training. The workshop also includes selected books and visits by working arts therapists.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

CLI-UG1466 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Policy, Community, and Self

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Eric Brettschneider

Description

Intended to introduce policy, this course will include an internship at a policy and /or advocacy organization. Community building, service integration and child welfare will be featured in readings, discussion, and internships. Through examples such as ethnic matching placements in foster care, zero tolerance approaches to drug abuse, or public financing of political campaigns, students will come to understand how government, schools, gangs, religious institutions and families can, with varying degrees of explicitness and formality, all make policy. Students will at the course conclusion be able to: identify policies within their lives; argue all sides of a policy question; appreciate the importance of evidence; and distinguish implementation from formulation. Readings will include Bowling Alone, by Robert Putnam, and The Lost Children of Wilder, by Nina Bernstein. Students will be helped to connect meetings they attend and the policy concepts taught and discussed in class. The goal is to leave no student unaware of the importance of policy in their own and their community's life. The course will focus on policies that are empowering. Assignments will include an internship journal.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

INDIV-UG1701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, January 28.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1144 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Free Speech and Democracy

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Paul Thaler

Description

The tension between free expression and social control has shadowed the Great American Conversation since the birth of this country. The constitutional ideal that our government "shall make no law" abridging free speech has given way, in fact, to laws that limit discussion, ostensibly for the public good. Likewise, new media technologies advance our ability to access and exchange ideas and information, but raise new questions as to the limits of such dialogue. This course, then, addresses the delicate balance between free speech and democracy, guided by seminal readings from Milton, Locke, Meikeljohn, among others, as well as important Supreme Court decisions that have critically shaped First Amendment rights in regard to hate speech, pornography, corporate control of mass media, the student press and the rights of journalists. With this foundation, we ask: Are there any forms of free speech that should be restricted? If so, which? And, who should decide?

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1370 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Popular Culture and the Struggle for Black Civil Rights

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Justin Lorts

Description

How has popular culture served as a path (or obstacle) to social, political and economic equality for African Americans? Can black popular culture align itself with political movements without compromising its artistic integrity and authenticity? What is “authentic” black popular culture anyway? For over a century black artists, intellectuals, political leaders and audiences have engaged with these questions, as part of a larger debate on the relationship between African American participation in popular culture and their status in American society. Because popular culture has historically been one of the few avenues of success open to African Americans, some have credited it with offering black artists and entertainers the possibility of economic success, social mobility and cultural visibility. Others, however, have charged popular culture with perpetuating negative stereotypes and limiting blacks in their quest for equality. Far from being settled, this debate continues today. This course will trace the development of this debate from a variety of historical, cultural and disciplinary perspectives. Students will analyze some of the key historical and contemporary works on the subject, as well as some of the movies, television shows, literature, music and comedy routines that were at the center of this debate.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ELEC-GG2710 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Theorizing Practices: Underground Archives

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Jack Tchen

Description

This is an intensive research seminar “decolonizing” knowledge and building on the students' own subaltern archival work, with the goal of producing publishable essays. As part of the "hidden" organizing work of groups excluded and marginalized from dominant normalizing political cultures, collectors and their collections are a foundational yet largely unrecognized group of cultural activists. This course will examine our own subject positions and our gleanings, visit collectors and their collections, and examine critical writings related to collecting, making presence, and the political culture of knowledge-making. Agnes Varda’s documentaries The Gleaners and I and Two Years Later will serve as a starting point for the class. Readings will likely include: essays by James Hevia, Dominick LaCapra, Bruno Latour, and Ann Stoler; and selections from: Ann Cvetkovich, An Archive of Feelings , Jacques Derrida, Archive Fever , Richards, The Imperial Archive , Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Decolonizing Methodologies , and Diana Taylor, The Archive and the Repertoire .

Notes

Same as G13.2304002. Permission of the instructor required (jack.tchen@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1612 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Contexts of Musical Meaning: What and How Does Music Mean?

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Gregory Erickson

Description

Is it possible to say that a piece of music “means” something? Can music communicate emotion, narrative, or philosophy? Can it embrace or resist political ideology? In what ways is music influenced by, or in what ways does it influence, society? For Richard Wagner, music and words together are capable of expressing the deepest thoughts and feelings that a human can have, and according to Nietzsche, music provides access to the nature of reality itself. On the other hand, Eduard Hanslick insisted that music should be divorced from the extramusical world, and Stravinsky famously claimed that music, by its very nature, is essentially powerless to express anything at all. More recently, thinkers have stressed the importance of approaching music as a cultural construct to reveal its encoded ideological meanings. This course will look at the nature of musical meaning from all these perspectives. We will listen to and discuss forms of Western art (i.e. “classical”) music as well as genres of popular and folk music as we explore the relationship of gender, race, class, and politics to musical works. Each unit in this course will take a specific musical text (Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, John Coltrane’s Love Supreme, the Beatles’ White Album) and explore different theoretical, philosophical and musicological approaches to the music’s “meaning.” We will read philosophical works of aesthetics and hermeneutics by Plato, Hegel, Schopenhauer, and Heidegger, essays by musicologists and cultural studies scholars such as Carl Dahlhaus, Theodor Adorno, Leo Treitler, Paul Gilroy, Susan McClary, and Robert Walser, and creative pieces by James Baldwin, Ralph Ellison, and John Cage.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1512 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

Fashion's Fictions: The Texts of Clothing

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Patricia Lennox

Description

The topic of clothing and adornment embraces a broad spectrum, from the need for protective covering to the desire for individual expression to the profit of international industries. Encompassing the history of civilization, clothing epitomizes the way a fundamental necessity has been transformed by cultural construction---as well as desire and creativity---into a complex social indicator, a matrix of culture, class, and gender identity. It is also about aesthetics and the love of beauty. This course looks at the topic from varied perspectives. The history of clothing/fashion is central, but In order to establish a critical grid and vocabulary to use with which to discuss clothing/fashion our sources will include interdisciplinary readings including cultural studies, art, sociology, economics, fashion theory, and semiotics. Above all, our primary focus will be on literature where we will explore the way ancient, medieval, Renaissance and modern writers use clothing as indicators of civilization, individuality, sensuality, polymorphous gender, guilt, and conspicuous consumption. Literature will include, Gilgamesh, Genesis, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Utopia and works by Longus, Shakespeare, and Zola. Other writers include Ann Hollander, Roland Barthes, Christopher Brewen, and James Laver. We will also visit at least one costume collection exhibit.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1485 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Beyond Picture Perfect: Personal Choice in a Digital World

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Jeff Day

Description

Beyond Picture Perfect explores the many choices available to today’s image makers. New technology combined with traditional photographic techniques will be addressed, enabling the students to realize their distinctive image-making vocabulary. Weekly discussions include understanding hardware mechanics, choosing a personal color palette, and recognizing “your” unique composition key. We will debate the many analog and digital tools available to photographers vital to their artistic expression. These concepts will be supported by weekly assignments and class critiques culminating in a final project portfolio. Students with interest in analog or digital formats will be encouraged to develop an understanding of their medium and form an original visual strategy. Museum/ gallery visits and field trips for on-location photographing will inspire students to create their own way of seeing. Readings may include selections from: Robert Adams, Why People Photograph ; London and Upton , Photography .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

WRTNG-UG1039 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Writing About Popular Music

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Amanda Petrusich

Syllabus

WRTNG-UG1039

Description

Effective music criticism—criticism that places a song or album within the appropriate social, political, personal, and aesthetic contexts—can be as enthralling and moving as the music it engages. In this course, we will explore different ways of writing about music, from the record review to the personal essay. We’ll consider the evolving tradition of pop music criticism (How are MP3 blogs and Web sites challenging print media? How is the critic’s role changing?) and the mysterious practice of translating sound into ideas (How do we train ourselves to be better and more thoughtful listeners?). Through reading, writing, and class discussion, we’ll contemplate the mysterious circuitry that causes people to embrace (or require) music—from Bob Dylan to Lil’ Wayne —and how best to explore that connection on the page. Readings will include Lester Bangs, Rob Sheffield, Carl Wilson, Sasha Frere-Jones, Robert Christgau, Ann Powers, Simon Reynolds, Chuck Klosterman, Ellen Willis, and others.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

INDIV-UG1701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin’s private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail Only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, Sept 12.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

FIRST-UG365 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Writing Seminar: The Idea of America: What Does it Mean?

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Hannah Gurman

Syllabus

FIRST-UG365

Description

This class will examine “America” as a complex, historically-rooted, and malleable idea, which writers, social scientists, politicians, and the state have shaped, changed, and critiqued to fit their own contexts and purposes. We will explore the historical roots and shifting conceptions of the idea of America through analysis of political treatises, poetry, essays, and official government documents from the pre-colonial period to the present. Approaching “America” as both a nation-state and an empire, and considering how it has been imagined by those within as well as outside its borders, we will analyze the idea of America not only in the context of life in the United States, but also in the context of global development, environmental crises, and American foreign policy. Students will write informal response papers as preparation for drafting and revising three essays over the course of the semester, including a literary critical essay. Texts will include works by John Locke, Alexis de Tocqueville, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Malcolm X, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Jeffrey Sachs, Naomi Klein, and Mark Danner, as well as official documents of U.S. foreign policy.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1552 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2011

Sociology of Religion: Islam and the Modern World

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Ali Mirsepassi

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1552

Description

This course is designed to explore the role of religion in modern societies. We will examine religion as an important social institution and also as a cultural system. We will study canonical and contemporary theories of religion. The focus of the course, however, will be Islam. We will look at the cultural context and historical construction of Islam, as well as the different social contexts within which Islam has evolved. We will examine the relationship between Islam and modernity, including secular ideologies, gender politics, and modern democracy. We will pay particular attention to the role that Islam plays in the everyday life of those who practice it, who are affected by it, or who struggle with it as their tradition. Our goal is to study Islam not as a fixed object or authentic tradition but as a social and cultural phenomenon subject to change, contestation, and critique. Texts may include Mernissi, Islam and Democracy; Arkoun, Re-Thinking Islam ; Fernea, In Search of Islamic Feminism ; and Armstrong, Islam .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG802 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Transfer Student Research Seminar: Coming Home: Identity and Place

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Jennifer Lemberg

Syllabus

FIRST-UG802

Description

In this writing seminar, we will interrogate the concept of returning home--to places known briefly or well, to the deeply familiar or merely imagined. Depictions of going home in the aftermath of major historical events figure in much recent literature, and through writing and class discussion, students will explore the effects of violent upheavals of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries—including, for example, the Holocaust, the Vietnam War, and American Indian dislocation—through the efforts of those affected by these events to return to sites from which they were displaced. We will also consider the relationship between identity and place, and the tensions that can develop between collective versus individual ideas of the self. The ways in which contemporary authors treat the theme of "coming home" across boundaries of time and space and the role this notion plays in the construction of contemporary ethnic, racial, and national identities will serve as our impetus for frequent exploratory writing, three formal essays, and a final research paper. Readings will include works by Eva Hoffman, Jonathan Safran Foer, Tim O’Brien, Danielle Trussoni, Sherman Alexie, James Welch, and Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, among others, as well as theoretical texts and short films.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Transfer Student Research Seminar (FIRST-UG)

FIRST-UG319 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Writing Seminar: Aesthetics on Trial

4 units Tue Thu
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Christopher Trogan

Syllabus

FIRST-UG319

Description

While cultures often like to see themselves reflected in the arts, groundbreaking art is frequently accompanied by controversy. In literature, Nabokov was faced with charges of obscenity. In the visual arts, controversies surrounding “public art” have helped to determine what art can be and do from a social perspective. In photography, people like Mapplethorpe have challenged the role of the visual arts as innocent representation. In film, Riefenstahl blurred the line between aesthetics and politics by directing for Hitler while Pasolini directed what still remains one of the most shocking films in cinematic history. Through critical writing we will investigate such questions as: How do we define art? What constitutes obscenity in the arts? Is art inherently political? Three shorter essays and a longer literary-critical paper are required. Texts may include selections from Dante, Hume, Lin, Nabokov, and Plato.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

WRTNG-UG1339 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Ripped from the Headlines: Current Events in Fiction

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Taylor Antrim

Syllabus

WRTNG-UG1339

Description

In 1961 Philip Roth wrote: "the American writer…has his hands full in trying to understand, and then describe, and then make credible much of the American reality." Is he right? Can a literary imagination encompass its social and political moment? Does it thereby lose its hold on universal truths? Or is there a perspective on and insight into current events only fiction can offer? We'll consider these and other questions through readings of novels and short stories that depict their contemporary political and cultural events. We'll pay particular attention to the ways these writers borrow, subvert, or reinvent journalistic (or "new" journalistic) techniques. Students will be expected to produce several written exercises, as well as two longer fictional pieces (short stories or novel chapters) that take current events as a starting point for narrative. These will be discussed through in-class workshops. Readings may include John Updike's Rabbit Redux, Joan Didion's Democracy, Don Delillo's Mao II, and Brett Easton Ellis's Less Than Zero, as well as short stories by Grace Paley, Alicia Erian and Martin Amis.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1408 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Leviathans, Lovers and Libertines: Theatre and Aesthetics of Grandeur

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Christopher Cartmill

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1408

Description

Louis XIV used theater, music and the visual arts to solidify and articulate his supremacy and in so doing created for himself the role of the magnificent and mighty "Sun King." But in his time Louis was not alone in understanding an idea that we now think so modern that image is all and that the manipulation of that image is the way to power and influence. This course examines performance and its expressions, both theatrical and political, during the Baroque period and the Age of Enlightenment. Readings may include: John E. Wills, 1688; Aphra Behn, The Rover; Jean Racine, Phaedra; Pierre Corneille, The Theatrical Illusion; Pedro Calderón de la Barca, La Vida es Sueño (Life is a Dream); Molière, La Tartuffe and Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme; Susanna Centlivre, A Bold Stroke for a Wife; John Dryden, All for Love; Marivaux, The Game of Love and Chance; Oliver Goldsmith, She Stoops to Conquer; the music of Monteverdi, Lully, Bach, Händel and Glück; as well as the art of Rubens, Le Brun, Watteau and more.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1341 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Oral Narratives: Stories and Their Variations

4 units Tue
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Suzanne Snider

Description

In this workshop, we’ll embrace oral history as both methodology and genre, seizing upon narrative discrepancies as oral history opportunities. Considering texts such as Voices from Chernobyl and Legs McNeil's Please Kill Me, we’ll explore how oral history can help us approach complex subjects and historic events, particularly those stories containing conflicting accounts. As part of this discussion, we’ll examine the elastic nature of memory, and the distinctions between individual memory and collective memory. We will challenge ourselves to reflect divergent viewpoints in our nonfiction writing, borrowing the lessons of conventional, as well as more overtly experimental nonfiction to accomplish this. How do we chronicle stories that do not conform to narrative convention? How can we retain conflicting accounts within our chronicle, rather than synthesizing them into one account? Students will read newspapers and magazines, looking for missing stories and missing voices. These omissions will serve as the inspiration for interviews and writing projects. The work of writers and documentarians such as Mary Ellen Mark, Luc Sante, Anna Deveare Smith, and Moises Kaufman will be included in our coursework.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1093 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Enlightenment and Its Legacy

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Rosanne Kennedy

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1093

Description

The Enlightenment, the 18-century cultural and intellectual movement in the West, has had a lasting influence on our present values and political thought. Reason, freedom, skepticism, critical thought, progress - and even democracy - are values and commitments we have inherited from this era. In order to specify the thought of this period (as well as debates and disagreements), we will first read various authors of the Enlightenment, including Montesquieu, Rousseau, Kant, and Wollstonecraft. In the second part of the course we will turn to the legacy of the Enlightenment. We will consider the doubts and critiques that have arisen. For example, Nietzsche and Freud (and psychoanalysis) have questioned the primacy of reason in both individual and collective action; Adorno and Foucault have questioned the ethics of political rationalism; and recent feminists have noted the paradoxes of the Enlightenment's rather narrow and implicitly gendered view of equality and citizenship. Do such criticisms alter our view of the basic tenets of Enlightenment thought? Or, on the contrary, might we read them as continuing the "spirit of critique" inaugurated by the thought of the 18th century?

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1110 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Art of Play

4 units Thu
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Maria Hodermarska

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1110

Description

We know that for children play is more than just fun; it is the work through which they develop. But what about when adults play? Plato wrote, “Life must be lived as play.” Through play we find our freedom, spontaneity, and our aesthetic. What is there in human beings that enables us to play? Why is play considered an innate capacity of people from the beginning of recorded history? What qualifies as play? When does play become art? In this course, everyone plays and in doing so examines the historic and contemporary uses of play as a universal impulse of humans, across generations and time. Play’s capacity to mitigate the grosser aspects of life will be considered. We will examine play as it is reflected through theories of child development, dramatic improvisation, fine art, politics, technology, the symbolism of fairy tales, the historic and contemporary, uses of puppets, masks, performance, and ritual across all cultures. Students will examine the necessity of play in their own child and adult lives—the creative spirit, the adventurer, and empathic connection with humanity, and laughter, too. Books may include: Nachmanovitch’s Free Play , Bettelheim’s The Uses of Enchantment , Huizinga’s Homo Ludens , Jung’s Man and His Symbols , Nietzche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1649 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Music of Poetry and the Poetry of Music

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Lisa Goldfarb

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1649

Description

Although the ancient Greeks used the word “moûsike” to designate both poetry and music and the two were once “one” art, with alphabetic writing their paths diverged and poetry, music, rhetoric, and musical theory became distinct from one another. Yet, however much music and poetry may have their separate histories and technical languages, poets and composers have continued to probe the relation between the two arts. In this course, we will focus on the relationship between music and poetry in the modern era -- from the “fin de siècle” and Verlaine’s call to the symbolist poets to compose “Music above everything,” to the modernists in English and American poetry and the jazz improvisations of the twentieth century. We will study musical and poetic history of the period, grapple with what we mean when we say a poem is musical and what melody means in poetry, and we will study how to define and discuss lyricism in music. Readings may include the work of modern poets (symbolists, imagists, modernists) – Mallarmé, Verlaine, Valéry, Pound, Auden, Mina Loy, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Stevens – and modern composers Debussy, Stravinsky, Copland, Ives, Thomson and the rhythms of blues and jazz. To develop a critical vocabulary, readings may also include texts on the history and theory of both arts (Winn, Bucknell, Kramer, Hollander, Meyer, Adorno).

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1523 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2011

Feminism, Empire and Postcoloniality

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Marie Cruz Soto

Description

Jamaica Kincaid once said, “I now consider anger as a badge of honor. [It is] the first step to claiming yourself.” Anger, rather than Betty Friedan’s “problem that has no name,” has haunted the life of many women whose negotiations of the meaning of gender, race and sexuality are marked by the violence of colonial-imperial encounters. Accordingly, this course examines the following questions: How have colonial-imperial encounters shaped the imagination of gender, race and sexuality? How have women built feminist solidarities amidst, or perhaps based on, the shared experience of violence and anger? In turn, how has the imagination of gender, race and sexuality redefined the histories of colonies and empires? To pursue these questions, course readings include literary and other scholarly texts engaging feminist and postcolonial theory. Readings range from Kincaid’s The Autobiography of My Mother and Rigoberta Menchú’s I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala to other texts by scholars like Uma Narayan, Patricia Mohammed, Vandana Shiva, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak and Ann Stoler.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1471 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2011

Black Intellectual Thought in the Atlantic World

2 units Wed
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Millery Polyné

Description

This course examines the foundations, implementations, and implications of intellectual thought(s) of the African diaspora from the period of slavery in the Americas and post-emancipation societies through the present. Arguably, black intellectualism maintains roots in African-descended religious and cultural societies that pre-dates slavery in the West, however, this seminar seeks to explore the emergence of critical thought through historical, sociological, literary, autobiographical, religious and ethnographic writing that addressed vital issues facing African-descended peoples in the modern world. The matrix of race, class and gender has been a useful lens to analyze the systems and structures in place that both benefited and impeded racial progress. Yet, the themes of migration, nationalism, humor, music and empire-building also serve as essential tools to untangling and mapping the roots and routes of black intellectualism on four continents. Through a diverse set of materials (primary documents, films, music, and art) that utilize a multimedia and interdisciplinary approach to a range of historical, literary, political and economic questions central to Afro-diasporic experience(s), this course will critically engage the writings of thinkers who were at the vanguard of the Afro-modern and theoretical world, such as Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Anna Julia Cooper, Arturo Schomburg, Richard Wright, C.L.R. James, Aimé Césaire, Frantz Fanon, Paule Marshall, and Angela Davis.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1656 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Environmental Psychology: Place and Behavior

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Meredith Theeman

Description

Environmental Psychology examines the intersections between behavior, mood, place and space. We will define "environment" and learn about the ways in which environments can impact our behavior, beliefs, and feelings. Does living in an urban place change the way you act in public? How can city planning impact the way you commute from home to school? Can exposure to a garden help you recover from surgery? When you are sick, can where you live impact how your symptoms are treated? This class will examine these questions related to natural and built environments by incorporating the theoretical perspectives and research methodologies of Ecology, Environmental Psychology, Geography, Physiology, and Sociology. Topics may include attachment to place, the concept of "home", the benefits of being outside, institutional spaces (e.g., schools, jails, and hospitals), privacy, and navigation. Readings may include: Benjamin, Arcades Project; Gibson, The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception; Kaplan & Kaplan, The Experience of Nature; Lynch, The Image of the City; Nasar, The Evaluative Image of the City; Thoreau, Walden; and Wilson, Biophilia.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1398 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Birth Control: Population, Politics and Power

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Lauren Kaminsky

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1398

Description

What is the political and economic value of people? Who has the right to control human reproduction and why? How do individuals express reproductive autonomy, and how do states exercise population control? This course will focus on birth control (broadly defined as the management of human reproduction) as a lens through which to see how the evaluation and cultivation of national populations has shaped government in the modern world. In discussing and writing about topics such as race and eugenics, overpopulation and sustainability, sterilization and abortion, human rights and demographic nationalism, students will draw on a variety of primary and secondary sources to develop their own ideas about government and self-government in the age of birth control. Readings will include works by Angela Davis, Thomas Malthus, Emma Goldman, Michel Foucault and Margaret Sanger.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1444 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Looking at Popular Culture: The Poetics of Television

2 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Karen Hornick

Description

Some critics refer to television as a “story machine.” Whether that label is fair or not (can a machine produce real art?), it seems clear that television providers can barely keep up with the audience’s insatiable demand for more and more stories. Most television narrative comes to us in the form of a “series,” a dramatic structure that is our basic focus in this class. How has that format assisted or limited TV storytelling? Are the storytelling structures we associate with TV unique to that medium or simple modifications of novelistic and cinematic conventions? In this class we will consider some of the basic Aristotelian components of “good” drama in relation to American television history—genre, character, plotting, and spectacle—and also in relation to questions about how a given program represents life and provides pleasure. We will also examine TV in the light of theories about the cultural and political consequences of its dominance of the American cultural scene in the latter half of the twentieth century and (it might be said) current decline. Readings will be chosen to accompany the close study of several television shows including a season or two of Mad Men and The Wire.

Notes

Course meets during the last seven weeks only, October 26–December 13.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1475 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

American Politics After 9/11: Empire, Race and Democracy

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
George Shulman

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1475

Description

The central goal of this course is to examine the relationship between democracy and empire that is displayed repeatedly in history: the Athenian polis, the Roman republic, and parliamentary Great Britain professed democratic principles and practiced imperial politics. We will focus on this paradoxical relationship in the American case. Partly, we ask theoretical questions, to explore what we count as "imperial" forms of power, and to trace how "empire" is internal (or "at home") and not only external (or "abroad"). Partly, we ask historical questions to relate democratic principles, exclusionary practices, and national expansion in American history. Have forms of imperial power (and their justification) changed over time? In what ways do citizens knowingly authorize or allow imperial politics? How have anti-imperial voices justified themselves? Partly, we assess post-9/11 politics to explore how the "war on terror” is related to historic white supremacy and a hundred years of anxiety about aliens and communism. In turn, how is the emergence of Obama (and also the Tea Party Movement) related to issues of imperial power? Have we entered a “crisis of the republic,” and if so, what is to be done? Readings may include Hannah Arendt, Imperialism and Crises of the Republic; J.M. Coetze, Waiting for the Barbarians; Margaret Atwood, Handmaid's Tale;   Allan Ginsberg, Wichita Vortex Sutra ; Norman Mailer, Armies of the Night and Why Are We In Vietnam?;   Judith Butler, Precarious Life; Talal Asad, On Suicide Bombing ;   recent essays by political theorists about post-9/ll politics.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ELEC-GG2545 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Shape of the Story: Content into Form

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Dave King

Syllabus

ELEC-GG2545

Description

How does the telling transform the story? And how can a story govern its own telling? In this course we’ll consider diverse storytelling strategies, looking at fiction, creative nonfiction and narrative poetry and also viewing the occasional short film. Through a range of exercises we’ll explore how a writer reimagines a project by making formal decisions about voice, genre, point of view, diction, even meter and rhyme. The intent is to move us away from our comfort zones, to help us draw invention from the unfamiliar and to broaden our literary palette, so students should be prepared to be daring, open-minded and seriously playful. Exercises will be shared with the class, which will also include traditional workshopping. Readings will include Amy Hempel, Ryszard Kapuscinski, Vikram Seth, Robert Frost, David Foster Wallace, Oliver Sacks and others; films by Su Friedrich and Kenneth Anger.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (davekingwriter@gmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1055 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Struggle for the Word: History of Media I

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Stephen Duncombe

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1055

Description

The history of the media is the history of struggle, a battle waged over words and images: who produces them, who has access to them, and whose interests are served by them. Beginning with the Bible and moving through plays and popular song; pamphlets, penny press and advertisements; this course will use the history of the printed word to explore enduring questions of power and culture. Readings will range from Genesis and Plato to the forced confessions of a barely literate sixteenth-century miller, Thomas Jefferson to Frederick Douglass, slave songs to early newspapers, and writings of public relations impresarios like Edward Bernays to the words of the novelist James Joyce.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1635 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Digital Art and New Media

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Cynthia Allen

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1635

Description

This workshop seeks to bring students from varying backgrounds together to engage in evaluating and developing digital new media for the Internet and other new media art installations. The Web makes possible a powerful new kind of student-centered, constructivist learning by collecting at a single site a phenomenal array of learning and creative resources that can be explored with simple point-and-click skills: photos, text, animation, audio and film materials. Emerging new media technologies allow cross-development and implementation to the Web. Each student brings to the class a set of experiences and skills, such as research, writing, design, film, music, photography, computer gaming, performance, illustration, computer literacy, software knowledge or Internet experience. Through lectures, including a survey of digital new media currently on the Internet, group discussions, field trips and workshops focusing on their personal skills, students will develop individual projects. The workshop will deconstruct innovative Web sites, computer and video games, film, using digital new media, as well as discuss concepts, content strategies, and frameworks that bridge theory and practice. Class projects, readings, writings, and Blog journal-keeping are essential components of this course. Students are encouraged to supply their own media.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1655 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Task of the Curator: Translation, Innovation and Intervention in Exhibitionary Practice

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Lissette Olivares

Description

From their birth in conjunction with the rise of the modern nation state, museums have been under scrutiny by artists, philosophers, public intellectuals, and everyday citizens. Even their precursors, the Early Modern Cabinets of Curiosities, were subtly critiqued by artists commissioned to paint the collections. In the twentieth century, several artists appropriated the role of the curator to denaturalize collection and display practices. The 1980s and early 1990s particularly witnessed an explosion of debates related to curatorial practice. Today, as museums turn towards what is often referred to as the "new museology," curatorial practice remains under scrutiny, and yet too often curators rely on the traditional "white box" to avoid a political stance, or to maintain a self-effacing relationship to their own practices of framing, contextualizing, and disciplining objects. This course explore the roles of curators in relation to how objects are displayed in museums and galleries, considering a variety of disciplinary and professional perspectives. The title, inspired by Walter Benjamin's theories of translation, brings attention to the often overlooked or naturalized labor of curators, which involves subtle but nonetheless transformative acts of framing and poetic interpretation. The course emphasizes a critical approach to display practices where students are exposed to a wide array of interdisciplinary critiques. Assignments may include primary research, museum ethnographies, and the development of a curatorial proposal. Students may be required to attend related events, and field trips. Authors include: Barbara Kirshenblatt Gimblett, Tony Bennett, James Clifford, Griselda Pollock, Carolina Ponce de León, Walter Benjamin, Nicolas Bourriaud, Claire Bishop, Jacques Ranciére, Guillermo Mosquera, Eungie Joo, amongst others.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1381 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Creative Democracy: The Pragmatist Tradition

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bill Caspary

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1381

Description

From Emerson, through William James, to John Dewey, and beyond, Pragmatism has been a uniquely American contribution to political theory and philosophy. Pragmatism, like classical political theory, is concerned with politics as a way of achieving the good life rather than viewing politics narrowly in terms of elections and governments. Through texts by and about the Pragmatists, especially Dewey, the course will introduce theories and practices of participatory democracy, economic democracy, civic journalism, progressive education, participatory action research, and conflict resolution. Reading Pragmatism as philosophy, in the Hegelian tradition, we will address many of the questions pursued by Marx, Nietzsche, and the postmodernists, and will uncover rich alternative answers. Possible readings include Emerson’s “Self Reliance”; James’s “Moral Equivalent of War”; Dewey’s The Public and Its Problems , “Creative Democracy,” and “The Economic Basis of the New Society”; Royce’s The Hope of the Great Community ; Seigfried’s Pragmatism and Feminism ; and West’s writings on “prophetic pragmatism.”

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1661 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Total War, Terror and Critique

4 units Thu
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
A.B. Huber

Description

There is currently a loud contest over what counts as terrorism, but there is also a quieter and wider crisis in our capacity to name and demarcate violence--the United States' and other's. It is no longer clear what counts as war, what constitutes a combatant, nor what kind of peace we might hope to make. What then can be said to confront, critique or rethink violence? We will begin the seminar by familiarizing ourselves with the origins and logics of the Just War Theory (including Aristotle, Cicero, and Augustine) and we will go on to consider the historical and philosophical contexts of Kant’s call for Perpetual Peace. But the seminar will focus primarily on critical theory’s engagement with the form and logics of modern warfare. Together we will read work from the Frankfurt School in order to begin to reckon the relationship between politics, aesthetics, and violence. Finally, with the help of contemporary theorists (including Asad, Butler, Chow, Mamdani, Mahmood, Redfield) we will turn toward questions of technology, terror, and the changing face of war in the 21st century. Can critique help us in anyway to abate violence or the anguish of its aftermath?

Notes

Same as COLIT – UA 843 002.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1565 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Playwriting

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Myla Churchill

Description

This writer’s workshop explores the symbiotic nature of playwriting. Through a series of exercises, we will discover how environment and experience influence identity, how plot is built on desire and need, and why perception and cultural context dictate the form or structure of a play. By examining classical paradigms and their influence on modern theatre, we can determine how to use or break these rules to find our own voices. And as we mine our souls and surroundings for the seeds of creation, we will write a one-act play. Some readings include Fornes, Parks, Fugard, Bogosian and Chekov.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1258 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
FA 2011

Ancient Theatre and Its Influences

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Laura Slatkin

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1258

Description

What role did the theater play in the civic life of ancient Greece? How did Greek drama address vital social and political issues? Does Greek drama serve as a useful paradigm for exploring contemporary theater? Through our readings, we will explore Greek theater as a live space of social action, representing conflicts between the claims of family and state, between male and female, between traditional values and emergent democratic concerns. We will examine Greek drama's relation to religion (e.g. sacrifice, lament, festival), to law (e.g. courtroom proceedings, punishment), and to civic debate. We will discuss both how plays were produced and the theories of drama they inspired. Building on our investigation of the Greek 'case', we will turn our attention to Roman drama and to selected works of the modern theater. Readings may include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Menander; Plautus, Seneca; Racine, Sartre, Fugard.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1555 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2011

Imagining India: From the Colonial to the Global

4 units Thu
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Ritty Lukose

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1555

Description

Drawing on an interdisciplinary set of readings about India, this course explores a fraught and difficult dynamic within the modern world – democratic nation-building. We move from a variety of pre-colonial and colonial imaginings of South Asia to politicized assertions of a unified Indian identity during the anti-colonial movement. Here, nation is not only a political entity, but also a cultural project that re-shapes ideas of self, religion, community, region, family, gender and kinship. The post-independence period is explored through writings on the Partition that created India and Pakistan, “development” as a key concept that has been central to nation-building, and struggles around caste, gender, sexuality, tribal identity, environment, region and religion. How the state contends with majority and minority identities and claims, the complexities of secularism, notions of equality and difference, all in the context of vibrant social movements and a large NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) sector will enable an in-depth exploration of how democracy, as idea and practice, happens in India. How globalization shapes contemporary understandings of India will be explored towards the end of the course. Readings include: Ronald Inden’s Imagining India , Amitav Ghosh on the Indian Ocean World, Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy by Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal, the writings of Gandhi and Nehru, subaltern studies collective writings on nationalism in India, The Nation and its Fragments by Partha Chatterjee, Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children , Menon and Bhasin’s Borders and Boundaries: Women in India’s Partition and India’s New Middle Class: Democratic Politics in an Era of Economic Reform by Leela Fernandes.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG384 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Writing Seminar: Walking and Writing in New York City

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Helena Ribeiro

Description

Writing and walking are both peripatetic activities: we wander through our ideas, making observations along the way, often taking a detour or two before arriving at our conclusion. This class will take the streets of New York as its starting point–our “ primary text” will be the City itself– and we will read the ways in which it has been walked through on paper, often in the form of descriptions of seeing it for the first time, or re-seeing it as if it were the first. Through a series of writing assignments, including informal journals and analytic, revised essays, students will contextualize and historicize their journeys through these texts–and through the city–as we come to understand how New York City got from “there” to “ here.” Readings may include works by Paul Dunbar, Gloria Naylor, Walter Benjamin, W.J.T. Mitchell, Michel de Certeau, Walt Whitman, Edgar Allan Poe, Diane Di Prima, Joyce Johnson, Rita Mae Brown, James Baldwin, Charles Brockden Brown, Henry James, José Martí, Hart Crane, Frank O’ Hara, Nathanael West, Jacob Riis, and others.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

CLI-UG1444 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Lyrics on Lockdown

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Marcella Runell Hall, Piper Anderson

Syllabus

CLI-UG1444

Description

This course will focus on the uses of the visual and performing arts and spoken word as tools for positive social change. Through hands-on collaboration with the Blackout Arts Collective and Island Academy, students will create artistic and dialogical spaces for critically thinking about the crisis of incarceration in this country. Speakers may include representatives of the Prison Moratorium Project and Malcolm X Grassroots Movement. Readings include writings by Augusto Boal, Christian Parenti, Manning Marable, Bakari Kitwana, and Bryonn Bain. Students will create arts-based workshops which they will facilitate with incarcerated youth at Rikers Island. Students do not need to be artists to participate in the course, however, creative building will be an integral part of the curriculum.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

ARTS-UG1470 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Public Square: From Concepts--to Models--to Monuments

4 units Mon
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Greg Wyatt

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1470

Description

This workshop focuses on the nature of creativity for the public space and the “model to monument” design and bronze casting. We will explores the process by which a concept becomes a three dimensional model and consequently a public monument. We will also investigate how ideas, or concepts in history have influenced individual artist in making public monuments. Some examples of this type of didactic art that we will explore are: Perikles’ Athenian building program after the Persian wars, Michelangelo’s David, the Columbia University “Alma Mater” in the middle of Columbia’s campus, the Peace Fountain next to St. John the Divine, Ghandi’s bronze on Union Square, Grand Army Plaza, “Sherman Memorial,” Avenue of Americas “Liberators Monuments,” Central Park “Literary Walk-Shakespeare” and “Angel of the Waters” and other sculptures and architectural sights in New York City. In addition to visiting most of the above New York City’s public monuments, each student in the class will adopt-a-monument that is in a decaying state and develop plans to restore it or study the possibilities to prevent it from further decay. Some sessions of this workshop will be conducted at the Art Students League with visits to the Queens Modern Art Foundry. Readings may include Plato’s Timaeus, Benvenuto Cellini’s Autobiography , Cezanne’s Letters, Delacroix’s Jounal , as well as Goethe and Leonardo on painting

Notes

Students should not schedule any classes immediately before or after this class to allow ample time to travel to offsite locations, as well as to the Modern Art Foundry and the Art Students League. Students are expected to pay for their own travel costs.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

WRTNG-UG1508 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Writing for Late Night Television: Monologue, Jokes, Bits, and Sketches

4 units Mon
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
D.B. Gilles

Syllabus

WRTNG-UG1508

Description

This course introduces students to writing for the world of late night television. Every talk show host has a unique voice and style. Work will include learning how to write opening monologues for The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, Chelsea Lately, Conan and Jimmy Kimmel among others. Understanding the difference between a sketch and a bit. How to structure a joke and find material. Work will also involve writing sketches ala Saturday Night Live. Students will learn how to go from idea, to building the sketch, to completing it and rewriting it to make it funnier. Writing assignments may include creating original on-going sketch characters, a Letterman Top Ten List, fake news items ala Weekend Update and writing short film parodies.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

FIRST-UG324 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Writing Seminar: Metamorphoses

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
June Foley

Description

This course explores the idea of metamorphosis, or transformation, by which humans become—among other things--stones, flowers, and stars; animals, gods, monsters; and members of the opposite sex. We read and write about some of the many varieties of metamorphosis, such as those linked with disguise and dissimulation; madness and dissolution; immigration and exile; sickness and healing; and self-creation that reflects self-knowledge. Students write academic essays that develop their own ideas in their own voices, in stages that progress from freewriting and drafting to workshopping, revising and polishing. Throughout the course, we reflect on writing itself as a transformation of subjective, ephemeral impressions into words fixed on paper (or shimmering in cyberspace) through which we communicate with others. Readings include selections from Ovid’s Metamorphoses (Humphries trans.); poems based on it by Ted Hughes and a contemporary play based on it by Mary Zimme rman; fairy tales, folk tales and contemporary revisions (ed. Maria Tatar); essays on immigration and exile in Letters of Transit (ed. Andre Aciman) and in Edwidge Danticat’s Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work; Kafka’s The Metamorphosis; and essays on neurological transformation and creative responses in Oliver Sacks’s An Anthropologist on Mars.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

FIRST-UG75 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: The Arabian Nights

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Sinan Antoon

Description

The Arabian Nights (The Thousand and One Nights) is one of the most fascinating "world" texts. Since its translation and publication in European languages it has captivated the imagination of countless writers and artists such as Poe, Joyce, Borges, Mahfouz, and Rushdie. It continues to play a disproportionate role in constructing and perpetuating an essentialized and imaginary East, populated by violent and hypersexual beings. The narratives of the Nights and the cultural archive they have spawned have had a fascinating influence on literary and artistic production, popular culture and political imagination. The course introduces students to this important world masterpiece and the debates surrounding it. We will start out by briefly tracing the genealogy of this collectively authored and anonymous text, its collection and versions and the cultural context of its translation and popularity in the west. We will then explore the literary structure and narrative strategies an d dynamics of the Nights, read some of its most famous cycles and discuss how they have been read from a variety of perspectives, focusing primarily on gender and sexuality, power and politics, and otherness and boundaries. In the last part of the course we will read some of the modern literary works inspired by the Nights (Borges, Mahfouz, and Rushdie) and will end by watching and exploring how the Nights fared in adaptations in popular culture, especially in the US.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1445 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Walls of Power: Public Art

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Terence Culver

Description

This workshop will explore how visual art, performance art, and activist art in the public sphere contribute to political dialogue and community building. The course will integrate the hands-on practice of public art making with the study of politics, community building, culture, and social issues as they relate to public art, with a special focus on New York City. A major component of the course will be a public art project that students will plan and execute during the semester. Selected readings will include: Bachelard, The Poetics of Space; Deutsche, Evictions: Art and Spatial Politics; Lacy, ed., Mapping the Terrain: New Genre Public Art; Malraux, Museum Without Walls; Raven, Art in the Public Interest; Rochfort, Mexican Muralists: Orozco, Rivera, Siqueiros.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG323 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Writing Seminar: Artists' Lives, Artists' Work

4 units Tue Thu
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Yevgeniya Traps

Syllabus

FIRST-UG323

Description

What is the relationship between art and life, between the luxury of creating and the necessity of surviving? In this writing seminar, we will explore the many ways artists’ experiences and the circumstances of creation influence artists’ work. How are artists shaped by the societies in which they live? How do family background, historical events, political movements, social disruptions, and celebrity influence our creations? How do artists, in turn, shape their societies’ attitudes and values? Focusing on how art and writing reveal the effects of race, gender, sexuality, and politics in the second half of the twentieth century, we will consider a number of works in their contexts. Using writing as a way of thinking critically, students will produce descriptive, analytical, and literary-critical essays. Readings may include works by Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Allen Ginsberg, Bob Dylan, Sylvia Plath, Andy Warhol, Susan Sontag, and Joan Didion.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1587 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Who Owns Culture?: Intellectual Property Law and the Cultural Commons

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Gail Drakes

Description

Can a yoga pose be considered “private property?” Who owns the genetic sequences found in your DNA? What are the rights of an author/artist and how do those rights overlap with the rights of the community to engage with works of art? What is the significance of the “public domain” and the “cultural commons” in a free-market economy? In this course, we will deepen our understanding of the cultural and ethical implications of copyright, trademark and patent law by placing the concepts of ownership and authorship in both historical and global context. In addition to scholarly essays drawn from the fields of history, legal studies, anthropology and sociology, this course will also draw on a range of texts from the visual arts, music, and literature. Course requirements include a research essay, research-based creative projects and in-class presentations. Texts studied may include Peñalver’s Property Outlaws , Coombe’s The Cultural Life of Intellectual Properties . Visual and audio sources from Girl Talk, Negativeland, DJ Spooky and Joy Garnett may also be included.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CLI-UG1460 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Literacy in Action

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Dianne Ramdeholl

Syllabus

CLI-UG1460

Description

This course combines volunteer work in New York City adult literacy and English as a second language programs with an academic introduction to the philosophy, history, and current issues of adult literacy. Students will work as volunteer teachers of reading and writing oral English or mentors at such institutions as the University Settlement, International Rescue Committee, Turning Point, and Fortune Society. In class they will read about and discuss such key issues as which “basic skills” U.S. adults now need; which adults lack these skills and why; the implications for our economy, families, communities, and democracy; the instructional approaches developed for adults; and the steps that might be taken to build support for high-quality, adult basic-skills programs. Throughout the course, students will relate such issues to their own on-site experiences in class discussion and role-playing, and create a portfolio of writing that includes on-site observations, lesson plans, reflections, and a final analytical paper. Readings may include Making Meaning, Making Change (Auerbach); We Make the Road by Walking (Horton and Freire); Pedagogy of the Oppressed (Freire) as well as other articles and journals ( Focus on Basics and The Change Agent ).

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

CORE-GG2225 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Master's Thesis Seminar

4 units
Section 002
Thu
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
David Moore

Description

This course engages students in the conceptual and technical processes leading to a thesis: articulating a core problem, reviewing appropriate literatures, designing effective methods, and constructing persuasive analyses. Through discussions of both published research articles and student work, the seminar examines the conventions of scholarly discourse, strategies of analysis and argumentation, and the ways in which writing can serve as a means to discover ideas. Students also learn academic writing skills; the conventions of scholarly discourse; strategies for building arguments; and the use of writing to explore ideas. Sections of the course focus on different thesis formats (research, artistic, project), but all take the student to the stage of preparing a thesis proposal.

Notes

Pass/fail only. Section 2 for the research or project thesis.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ARTS-UG1305 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Rudiments of Contemporary Musicianship

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
John Castellano

Description

This course is designed to help students develop a better understanding of music by presenting the opportunity to experience music “as a musician.” Students learn basic music theory, develop rudimentary musicianship skills, and use that experience to compose and rehearse student compositions. The goal is for each student to be able to compose, rehearse, and then perform his or her own original music. The workshop meets in a professional music rehearsal studio where students have access to a wide variety of musical instruments and other resources.

Notes

Lab fee: $35. Course meets at Drummer's Collective, 123 West 18th Street.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

CORE-GG2225 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Master's Thesis Seminar

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Julie Malnig

Description

This course engages students in the conceptual and technical processes leading to a thesis: articulating a core problem, reviewing appropriate literatures, designing effective methods, and constructing persuasive analyses. Through discussions of both published research articles and student work, the seminar examines the conventions of scholarly discourse, strategies of analysis and argumentation, and the ways in which writing can serve as a means to discover ideas. Students also learn academic writing skills; the conventions of scholarly discourse; strategies for building arguments; and the use of writing to explore ideas. Sections of the course focus on different thesis formats (research, artistic, project), but all take the student to the stage of preparing a thesis proposal.

Notes

Pass/fail only. Section 1 for the artistic thesis.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1659 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Exploring Frontiers and Fictions of Science

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Jose Perillan

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1659

Description

To many people the latest theories in science may seem distant and otherworldly. Math, logical reasoning, and subject specific technical jargon can form intimidating barriers to modern scientific understanding. Why then are big science fiction movies like Star Wars and Avatar so successful at the box office? Is the sci-fi genre simply a social lubricant for the acceptance of science? Do these fictional narratives prophetically predict innovations within the sciences or do they actually serve to inspire these innovations? At its core, the sci-fi genre emerges from the interlacing of scientific rationality and the escapism of story-telling, extrapolating current scientific knowledge into alternate realities. In this seminar we will explore the genre of science fiction and its underlying literary and scientific elements. Readings may include works by: Isaac Asimov,Ursula K. Le Guin, Arthur C. Clarke, Leon Lederman,Orson Scott Card, Alice Sheldon, Kurt Vonnegut, Richard Dawkins, H.G. Wells, Octavia Butler, Robert A. Heinlein, John Gribbin, Philip K. Dick, and Jules Verne.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG35 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Family

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Patrick McCreery

Syllabus

FIRST-UG35

Description

The concept of “family” is contentious: politicians seek to define it, marketers struggle to reach it, media makers attempt to represent it, and many individuals hope to transcend it. This course offers both a critical examination of family and an introduction to the academic disciplines that study it. In the United States, legal, social, and personal definitions of family are constantly being established and abandoned, expanded and limited. This fluidity exists partly because historical processes such as slavery, immigration, and demands for gay rights can re-shape popular conceptualizations of family. Likewise, academic disciplines such as history, sociology, biology, law, literature, and literary theory routinely offer new and sometimes contradictory ways of understanding family. This course will use these disciplines to illuminate the complicated ideas and emotions that can surround what arguably are our closest relationships. Works we may study include Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale , George Chauncey's Why Marriage? , and the photography of Sally Mann.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1527 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Finance for Social Theorists

4 units Mon
7:45 PM - 10:15 PM
Peter Rajsingh

Description

Why are some private, profit-making institutions “too big to fail?” The objective of this course is to provide students with conceptual, interpretive and analytical tools to understand finance. The approach will be interdisciplinary and interpretive, drawing upon political theory, economics, psychology, basic statistics and accounting. For example, we will use the subprime crisis to explore core concepts associated with credit, banking, business ethics, monetary policy and macro economics. We will reference key ideas from familiar texts and also take up contemporary debates in finance. The aim is to help students become more literate and numerate as economic and social agents. Readings include Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations (excerpts); John Stuart Mill, Principles of Political Economy (excerpts); Georg Simmel, The Philosophy of Money ; Peter Bernstein, Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk ; Mohammed El-Erian, When Markets Collide ; and Nassim Taleb, Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in the Markets and in Life .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1070 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Writing About Film

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Christopher Bram

Syllabus

WRTNG-UG1070

Description

Writing about movies is more than just issuing thumbs-up, thumbs-down judgments. In this class you will learn how to discuss a film’s content, style, and meaning in ways that can interest even people who disagree with you. You will explore some of the many different ways there are to write about cinema, expanding your command of words by reading such critics as James Agee, Pauline Kael, James Baldwin, Molly Haskell, and others. Students will write (and rewrite) five papers ranging from brief movie reviews to a final eight-to-ten page essay.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1277 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Alchemy and the Transformation of Self

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Lee Robbins

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1277

Description

The focus of this course is the one relationship we sustain from birth to the grave and possibly beyond—the relationship to ourselves. The quality of our relationship to work, community and intimate others is deeply affected by the level of connection we have to parts of ourselves. In this course we explore the “middle ground of psychic realities” between ego and unconscious, soul and deity, male and female, spirit and body and finally self and other. The middle ground within the psyche is presented in historical perspective from Buddha through the ancient art of alchemy to the modern depth of psychologies of Freud, Jung and Winnicott. How does each of these traditions understand the psyche as the site of struggle and radical transformation? Students will have the opportunity to discover and experience the middle ground within themselves through the crafting of personal Alchemical rituals. Readings may include: Suttas from the Pali Canon, Eliade’s The Forge and the Crucible, Plato’s Symposium, Corbin’s Avicenna and the Visionary Recital, Bachelard’s Poetics of Space, Emerson’s “Self Reliance”, Edinger’s Anatomy o f t he Psyche and especially selections from CG Jung who rediscovered alchemy as the antecedent to his own psychology of the unconsciious and so introduced the ancient art of alchemy into the modern and postmodern world.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1420 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Rites of Passage into Contemporary Art Practice

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Barnaby Ruhe

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1420

Description

Modern art has been a balancing act between control and letting go. This course focuses on the psychological interface between the two, the “liminal” zone. We will survey modern artists’ techniques for tapping the sources of creativity, including Dada collagists’ free-associations; Surrealists’ automatic writing, doodles, and “cadavres exquises”; and Abstract Expressionists’ embrace of chaos as a resource. We will engage in very simple exercises: doodling, speed drawing, painting an abstract mural as a group, keeping a liminal journal, collaging, and exploring ritualistic techniques. We will follow up each exercise with discussions, take a trip to MoMA, and conclude the course with an essay, reexamining modern art in light of the inner journey each of us has taken during the course. Readings include writings by Arnold van Gennep, R.D. Laing, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Victor Turner, Mircea Eliade, James Elkins, and Frida Kahlo.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG74 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Historical Memory in War and Peace

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Hannah Gurman

Syllabus

FIRST-UG74

Description

In the aftermath of the Holocaust, Primo Levi wrote, “Never forget that this has happened.” Levi’s imperative raises important questions about the role of memory in contemporary atrocity and war. What is the purpose of remembering atrocity? What is the relationship between memory and justice? Between memory and history? Focusing on the Holocaust, the Rwandan genocide, and the U.S. wars in Vietnam and Iraq, this course will examine how war tribunals, war memorials, literature, film and leaked government documents have shaped, challenged, and revised the way we think about these events. Readings may include works by Hannah Arendt, W.G. Sebald, Philip Gourevitch, Tim O’Brien, Daniel Ellsberg, Maya Lin, and Julian Assange.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

CLI-UG1445 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Shifting Focus: Video Production and Community Activism

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Mark Read

Syllabus

CLI-UG1445

Description

This course examines the history, theory and practice of video advocacy. The moving image has long been used by grassroots political movements to mobilize constituencies in order to effect social change. Today, video has become an essential tool for social and political actors working on a wide array of issues. In this hands-on class, students will examine the biases of corporate-controlled media; learn the theory and history of video activism; develop basic camera skills; and reflect on lessons learned in the field. Outside of class, students will break into groups and will collaborate with local community organizations in the conception and production of a short piece of “tactical video.” Readings will include selections from Noam Chomsky, Thomas Harding, and Harvey Molotch.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

FIRST-UG367 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Writing Seminar: Visual Texts

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Chinnie Ding

Description

The force of the familiar claim that a picture is worth a thousand words is curiously undercut by the reliance on words to deliver that news. How might we apprehend an image without thinking it through language, or read a text without conjuring up our own visuals? Oriented by readings on politics and aesthetics---by Roland Barthes, Leo Bersani, Johanna Drucker, Allan Sekula, Susan Sontag, and others---we will focus on works of art and writing that mingle images and text in the form of documentary, film, fiction, or graphic novel. Students will write, revise, and workshop a series of analytical essays, culminating in a final, extended critical reading that considers texts and images as specific as well as collaborative operations.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

FIRST-UG353 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Writing Seminar: The Faith Between Us

4 units Mon Wed
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
Scott Korb

Description

Look at the headlines, flip through a magazine, or click the link to your favorite blog, and increasingly you’ll find that whether faith comes between us, separating one believer from another, or lives between us, forming the glue that holds communities together, is a question we all must face. Through a consideration of a variety of contemporary religion writing—mostly from newspapers, popular magazines, journals, and Web sites—this course will ask students to take their own excursions into faith and faithlessness, and through a process of writing, workshopping, and the all-important rewriting, create the stories that, in Joan Didion’s words, “we tell ourselves in order to live.” Readings will include pairings of essays by writers including Reza Aslan and Karen Armstrong, Paul Elie and Marilynne Robinson, Peter Manseau and Darcey Steinke, Christopher Hitchens and Chris Hedges, Sam Harris, and Irshad Manji.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

FIRST-UG345 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Writing Seminar: Love and Trouble

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Susan Weisser

Syllabus

FIRST-UG345

Description

All you need is love, love makes the world go around, and love is a battlefield, so the songs tell us. What kinds of love are essential to our well-being, and why does love so often go wrong? This course will examine friendship, romance and marriage, and parenthood as forms of love that are very personal and yet have social rules of their own, sometimes unspoken. We will use a selection of philosophical, sociological and literary texts to see what they contribute to our understanding of how love and trouble sometimes go together. Readings might include selections from Aristotle on friendship, Dan Savage on parental love, a history of marriage, and the postmodern theorist Roland Barthes’ A Lover’s Discourse ; literary texts include drama by Neil LaBute, memoir by Jamaica Kincaid, fiction by Jane Smiley and Yukio Mishima, and poetry by Anne Sexton. Discussing what we think and feel about these representations of love will serve as the springboard for developing students’ writing on the subject. Students will compose descriptive and critical essays and workshop their writing in multiple drafts.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1571 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Writing for Television I

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Imani Douglas

Description

This workshop will explore the process of turning an idea into a teleplay. Prior to delving into the world of television, we will take a peek into writing for stage and film. The differences and similarities of these mediums will be investigated, via such works as Neil Simon’s The Odd Couple , successful in all forms—stage, film, and TV sitcom. Structure, function and form will be examined via the reading of scripts and viewing of films and classic TV. Students will spend ten weeks of the semester creating, developing, and writing a sitcom episode of a classic television series, such as I Love Lucy. Students will learn first-hand what it takes to complete a writing assignment from pitch, to beat sheet, outline, first draft, rewrite, to table draft, under the direct supervision and guidance of an executive producer. In this way, students will learn the business of the TV writer and what it takes to be successful in “the room” of a Hollywood TV show. Readings may include Writing for Television by Madeline DiMaggio and Laughs, Luck and Lucy! by Jess and Gregg Oppenheimer.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG32 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: The Social Construction of Reality

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Stephen Duncombe

Syllabus

FIRST-UG32

Description

How do we know what is real and what is illusion? From the philosophy of the ancient Greeks to contemporary movies such as The Matrix , this question has haunted humankind. This course begins with the premise that "the real" is something we construct. We create reality through the stories we tell and the stories told to us. Since the most powerful storytellers today are the commercial media, we will pay special attention to the role of entertainment, advertising, and public relations in constructing our reality. Texts for the course include works by Plato, Rene Descartes, W.E.B. Du Bois, Maxine Hong Kingston, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Herman Melville, Walter Lippmann, Jean Baudrillard, Slavoj Zizek, Judith Butler, Jonathan Lear and John Berger.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1419 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or EARLY
FA 2011

Primary Texts: Plato and Machiavelli on Philosophy and Politics

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
George Shulman

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1419

Description

This course compares Plato’s Republic to Machiavelli’s two great texts, The Prince and The Discourses. Our goal is two-fold. On the one hand we learn the art of close reading to reveal the complex and contradictory layers of meaning in a text. On the other hand, we introduce the enterprise of political theory by exploring two of the greatest (and apparently antithetical) thinkers about politics. For Plato, philosophy seems to provide standards of judgment and order in politics: human life can flourish only if rulers gain philosophic knowledge of justice. He thus consigns political life, and the “mere” opinions of those who inhabit it to a “cave” which can be escape (and ruled) only by those who pursue philosophy. In contrast, Machiavelli denies that philosophic truth is relevant to politics: we do not need to leave “the cave” of the political world, for we can produce forms of order and standards of justice through political life itself. If he seems to embrace the moral dilemmas, contingency, and risk that Plato seems to avoid by turning to philosophy, it is no wonder he has been cast as a corrupt even “evil” figure! To stage a conversation between Plato and Machiavelli, therefore, is to confront the fundamental questions about politics: what is the nature of power? What is justice? What is the best form of regime? How is myth and art related to political life? Is force or fraud ever justified? What characterizes human excellence? In what consists human freedom? We pursue these questions by focusing on primary texts, but also by reading essays about the contemporary stakes of their arguments. This class is limited in enrollment to sophomores.

Notes

Open to sophomores only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG382 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Writing Seminar: The Body Politic and the Politics of the Body in American Culture

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Neil Meyer

Syllabus

FIRST-UG382

Description

When a group of English Puritans sailed for New England, John Winthrop told them they would become "members of the same body." As Winthrop assigned some to be the heart, the head, and the limbs of their new colony he inaugurated an imagination of the American body that runs from the first colonial encounters to today. This class will examine the complex work of creating, describing, writing, and quite simply "inventing" American bodies. Through analytic and reflective writing, we will consider how the discourses of history, literature, psychology, and politics employ images and ideas about the body to represent the nation. Our own writing will explore the complex issues that arise when considering bodies and their representation, including representations of slavery, the women’ s rights movement, and the birth of the modern homosexual identity. Writing assignments will include a course blog, critical and descriptive essays, and feature workshops and revision as key parts of the learning process. Readings may include works by Susan Bordo, Charles Chesnutt, Lisa Duggan, Michel Foucault, Sigmund Freud, Harriet Jacobs, and others.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1443 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Theorizing Popular Culture

2 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Karen Hornick

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1443

Description

This class surveys popular culture studies from their origin in 19th century debates about the relation of culture to society, politics, and aesthetics. The phrase “popular culture” was once used to describe the everyday life and pastimes “of the people", but today its often used interchangeably with “mass culture” to refer to entertainments and objects manufactured for profit and distributed as widely as possible. How did this shift in meaning come about? Do mass and popular culture effect our social-political life, or reflect it, or neither? Have technological developments such as the invention of cameras and computers harmed or helped? What has happened to art in the age of mass culture? Why, for instance, do discussions of a popular song or TV show so often focus on its political and economic meanings rather than the aesthetic and emotional pleasures it may yield? Is it desirable or possible to restore “the people” as the makers, rather than the consumers, of culture? Readings may include critics such as Marx, Arnold, Leavis, Adorno, Benjamin, Greenburg, Macdonald, Barthes, Radway, Fiske, and Frith.

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, September 6–October 23.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ELEC-GG2750 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Transitional Justice and Human Rights

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Vasuki Nesiah

Description

Transitional justice is that subfield of human rights focused on redress of past mass atrocities in contexts of political transition through a family of mechanisms that include trials, truth commissions, reparation programs, memorials and institutional reform initiatives. Transitional justice has brought a transformation in international human rights law over the last two decades. While born in the post-World war II Nuremberg trials the field gained momentum in the early nineties when, within a five year period, truth commissions were established in countries such as Chile, El Salvador, Guatemala and South Africa; international tribunals were launched to address war crimes in the former Yugoslavia and the genocide in Rwanda. These initiatives were often accompanied by reparation policies for ‘victims’. Memorials were built to honor the dead, and reform proposals were enacted under the global mantra of ‘nunca mas’ or never again. This class examines the enabling conditions and (intended and unintended) consequences of this turn to transitional justice. We will look at what is at stake in different understandings of accountability and what kind of global subjects are constituted in transitional justice engagements. Reading some of the most important critical interventions of the last decade, the class will collectively analyze the normative and strategic questions regarding how different approaches negotiate, challenge or legitimize different actors, institutions and alternative imaginings of 'justice'. The course is open to graduate students; advanced undergraduates are permitted with the permission of the instructor. There is a lot of reading for the course (10 books) – virtually a book a week for most weeks– so those interested should be able to manage that reading load. This is not a survey course that provides an overview of transitional justice norms, laws and institutions. Rather, it seeks to analyze the transitional justice field through engagements with theorists from multiple disciplines, including international law, political theory, history and anthropology. Readings include Hannah Arendt, Kamari Clark, Ruti Teitel, Rosalind Shaw and others.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (vn10@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ARTS-UG1107 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Body Wisdom for Performers

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Robin Powell

Description

This experiential workshop explores the theory and practice of The Alexander Technique, The Feldenkrais Method, Kinetic Awareness, and other body awareness techniques. The developers of these methods recognize that the ability to notice sensations, feelings, differences, and changes in the body lead to better integration of the mind and body and can effect profound changes in functioning. These techniques are valuable for performing artists who want to gain more freedom of expression, range of motion, comfort, concentration and presence in their work and daily lives. By using focused attention to sense your body in motion and at rest muscular tension and poor body habits that interfere with performance can be released. The course is designed for the student who is ready to commit to an in-depth investigation of their body and is ready to make physical and mental changes through quiet focused attention. Each class will be divided between lecture, discussion, and experiential material.Students will keep a detailed journal relating to their experience in and out of class, their practice of the exercises, and weekly readings. In addition, essays will be assigned. Readings include Mirka Knaster's The Knowing Body and a packet of articles on the various methods.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1080 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Site-Specific Performance: Art, Activism and Public Space

4 units Thu
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Martha Bowers

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1080

Description

This course looks at the development of site-specific performance with a special emphasis on projects that directly involve specific communities and include activist agendas. “Site-specific” is a term frequently associated with the visual arts but since the Happenings of the ’60s and ’70s, a body of work termed “site-specific performance” has evolved as highly structured works of art that are designed around, for or because of place. In the streets, in fields, deserts, forests, garbage dumps, abandoned buildings, on the border, aboard boats, in virtual space and outer space, this genre has unleashed the power of performance to indelibly mark our sense of locational identity. As site artists confront the matrix of social forces and overlapping communities that relates to a given site, their aesthetics, creative process and goals have shifted. How are they blurring the lines between art and activism, art and urban renewal, art and spirituality, art and real life? This course will emphasize making site work by completing a progressive series of site studies, using various artistic mediums, designed to build skills as students work towards creating a final site project in teams. We will also be reading about and viewing documentation of site work by seminal artists in this field. As this field is highly interdisciplinary, this course is recommended to students with interests and some training in at least one of the following mediums: dance, theatre, spoken word poetry, media, photography and/or visual art. Readings include excerpts from The Lure of the Local, Lucy Lippard; Mapping the Terrain: New Genre Public Art , ed. Suzanne Lacy; Local Acts , Jan Cohen Cruz; Essays on the Blurring of Art and Life , Allan Kaprow; Re-Framing the Theatrical , Alison Oddey among others.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG379 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

First-Year Writing Seminar: Utopia: The Logic and Ethics of Imagining New Worlds

4 units Mon Wed
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Tara Gellene

Syllabus

FIRST-UG379

Description

In the sixteenth century, Thomas More imagined his own ideal state. Instead of Eutopia, which means ‘happy place,’ More ironically named his imaginary island Utopia, which means simply ‘no place.’ The concept of utopia now carries both meanings and embodies the logical and ethical tensions that plague metaphorical (and sometimes geographical) borderlands between the ideal and the real. Associated with a diverse range of written genres from political philosophy to fiction, the name "utopia" is applied to real world communities, both secular and religious. Utopias are examined and challenged by critical theorists, and contemporary feminists, Marxists, environmentalists, and cosmopolitans continue to imagine new and complex utopias. In this course we will explore some of the following questions through a variety of texts and modes of textual analysis: Where did the notion of utopia come from and where is it going? What is the relationship between utopia and dystopia? Might it be dangerous to imagine and desire a utopia? What does the utopia one imagines say about who one is and the world one lives in? Students will write and revise three essays and a literary-critical essay. Readings may include work by Plato, Thomas More, H.G. Wells, George Orwell, Edward Bellamy, Ernest Callenbach, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Richard Rorty, Charles Nordoff, Frederic Jameson, and Krishan Kumar.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1660 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2011

The Concept of Race in Society and History

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Kimberly DaCosta

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1660

Description

This course offers a comparative sociohistorical analysis of race. Using a wide range of empirical and theoretical materials, we problematize what is too often considered settled: what constitutes race. We explore historical and cross-national variations in the bases of racial division, as well as the mechanisms through which racial domination is (re)produced. We begin with the prevailing assumption that race is a biological fact. By showing how even biologists reject the notion of race on scientific grounds, we open the way to exploring race as a social construct--one that has changed over time, and varies across societies. Rather than study the history of particular groups, we explore mechanisms of racial domination, including classification, prejudice, discrimination, segregation, ghettoization, and violence. We read selections from sociology, anthropology, history and literature on ethnoracial division in the US, Western Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America. Readings may include works by Stephen Gould, George Fredrickson, Virginia Dominguez, Carl Degler, DeVos and Wagatsuma, Barbara Fields, Pierre Bourdieu, Loic Wacquant, Ann Stoler, Zygmunt Bauman, Nancy Scheper Hughes and Colson Whitehead.

Notes

Same as SOC-UA 970 002.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Transfer Student Research Seminar: Myths and Fables in Popular Culture

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Patricia Lennox

Syllabus

FIRST-UG801

Description

Myths, fables, folk tales, and fairy tales are universal. Their heroes, villains, gods and monsters are as old as storytelling and as new as the latest award-winning film. In this class we will examine some of these stories and their histories, watching the shifts in emphasis as they are retold and adapted, but also considering why certain mythic figures, such as the vampire, gain greater currency in contemporary tales. Our research will focus on old and new versions of tales, their cultural construction and the critical discourse surrounding them. It will serve as the springboard for a series of exercises focused on research methods, several short writing assignments, and a major research paper. Sources will include, but not be limited to, selections from works by: J.R.R. Tolkien, Disney, Ovid, Apuleius, Charles Perrault, the Brothers Grimm, Angela Carter, Bruno Bettelheim, Joseph Campbell, Jack Zipes, and Nina Auerbach.

Notes

Open to Gallatin students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Transfer Student Research Seminar (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1541 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
FA 2011

Divine Indifference

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Aaron Tugendhaft

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1541

Description

Do the gods care about human beings? Is history providentially guided? Is there divine retribution after death? Or is god indifferent to human well-being? In this course we explore how different views of the divine are related to such themes as human freedom, happiness, despair, justice, and nihilism. We begin with works by Solon and Sophocles to set forth the traditional view of Greek piety and observe how it begins to be questioned. We then turn to the Epicurean tradition, to assess the impact of its view of god's indifference. We will conclude by considering two questions: What is at stake in the contrast between Epicurean theology and the Christian teaching of a philanthropic god who dies for human sins? To what degree does ancient Epicureanism serve as the foundation for the modern critique of Christianity? The key texts will be Sophocles' Oedipus Rex , Lucretius' On the Nature of Things , Spinoza's Ethics , and Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CORE-GG2335 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Master's Thesis and Defense

3 units Wed
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Karen Hornick

Description

Students registering for this course meet in the beginning of the semester with the thesis reviewer to discuss the procedures for organizing and presenting the thesis. It then becomes an independent project with the student's adviser to complete the thesis. Students are required to register for Thesis and Defense when they have completed 37 credits in the M.A. program. This course is required for completion of the master's degree program.

Notes

Pass/fail only. Course meets one time only on Wednesday, September 7. Permission required to register; please contact Gallatin's Office of Student Services.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1470 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2011

(Re) Imagining Latin America

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Alejandro Velasco

Description

In Bolivia, where non-indigenous elites long ruled exclusively, an indigenous president now leads a socialist revolution; in Argentina, where governments once massacred youth by the thousands, citizens now fill the streets to demand accountability; in Guatemala, where Catholicism long reigned supreme, evangelicals now find rapt audiences. Throughout the region, the once unthinkable is becoming normative, and everywhere pundits wonder: are these the stirrings of a new Latin America or the rumblings of old ghosts in different form? This course has two aims: on one hand to decipher how Latin America has conventionally been imagined, by introducing students to major themes in the region’s study like mestizaje and machismo, authoritarianism and revolution, dependency and industrialization; on the other hand to question how valid these imaginaries remain against the backdrop of contemporary examples of social, political, and economic transformation in Mexico, Argentina, Venezuela, Brazil, and elsewhere. Readings draw widely from academic articles in history, anthropology, and political science, excerpts from memoirs and contemporary journalism, and samplings of music and visual arts, generating thematic student papers asking: is it time to re-imagine Latin America in this new century, and if so, how? Authors include Simón Bolívar, Gabriela Mistral, Gabriel García Márquez, Gustavo Gutiérrez, Hermano Vianna, Javier Auyero, and Mariano Azuela.

Notes

Open to sophomores only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CORE-GG2019 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Proseminar: Silent Subjects: Critique and the Limits of Language

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 8:20 PM
Ben Steinfeld, A.B. Huber

Description

This seminar will introduce students to critique, a mode of questioning and a practice of analysis that exposes the actions of power and denaturalizes social and political hierarchies. In this context, and drawing on perspectives from history, literature, philosophy, and political and critical theory, this seminar will take up the difficulties of speaking and writing about silence in order to consider the importance of what is unsaid or unsayable for our formation as subjects. How are our psyches and social worlds formed around a multitude of silences--traumatic, enforced, and/or enabling? In Western philosophy and political thought silence has often been figured as the Other of speech and reason, and cast as the domain of the abject or excluded, or associated with catastrophic experiences at the limits of human reason (including the extremities of pain, violence, and death). In the context of this Continental tradition we will familiarize ourselves with recent scholarship on testimony and the “unspeakable,” while also critiquing the assumption that silence is necessarily solipsistic or signals only the failure of speech or freedom. Some silences are enjoined or imposed; others, like the recent silent protests of the indignados in Spain and Greece, propose alternative politics and constitute their own communities. Throughout we will consider how critique can help us recognize and account for the operations of silence, and those other concealed or disavowed forces, that are in fact inseparable from the everyday workings of language, knowledge, and ideology. As part of our inquiry actor, musician, and director Ben Steinfeld will work with our class on the role silence plays in performance.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1316 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Rethinking the Biological Sciences: Haraway, Theory and Culture

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bradley Lewis

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1316

Description

Rethinking the Biological Sciences: Haraway, Theory and Culture Today’s biology has moved out of the lab and into our biofutures. Genetically modified foods, in vitro fertilization, cloning, the biomedical enhancement debates, neurochemical psychic manipulation, and even the possibility of a posthuman culture all loom on the immediate horizon. These biological developments challenge our familiar ways of thinking, and they upset many of our most cherished categories and priorities. As a result, new ways of thinking must emerge to understand and cope with today’s biological sciences. One of the most important scholars to respond to this challenge is feminist historian of science, Donna Haraway. Haraway is unique because of her extensive use of recent theoretical work from humanities and cultural studies to think again about biology. We devote this class to a close study of her work, and we consider the intellectual context of Haraway’s writing in feminist theory, science fiction, and the biosciences.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1326 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Letter as Literature

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Victoria Blythe

Description

The letter as a genre of literature is situated in a middle space between private and public discourse. This writing seminar will inhabit the “space of the letter” to experiment with the letter-format as a unique modality of self-inscription. We will examine the “space of the letter” as an especially productive location for writing, and the literary letter as a vehicle with the potential to transport our writing from personal communication to literary work. We will theorize the letter by reading other people’s mail, such as Sylvia Plath’s “Letters Home,” Kafka’s “Letter to My Father,” and Rilke’s “Letters on Cezanne,” letters written as literary works, and letters never intended to be read. We will investigate the rhetoric, psychology and economy of the letter, a trajectory that will take us through the dead letter office (Derrida’s “Post Card”) and into the realm of blackmail (Poe’s “Purloined Letter”). As a community of writers we will “send and receive” letters in various literary formats, and take our place on the cutting edge with the electronic letter as it shifts the paradigm of this familiar, but strange, literary genre.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

WRTNG-UG1305 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Art of the Personal Essay

4 units Wed
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Sharon Friedman

Description

The personal essay is a flexible genre that often incorporates rumination, memoir, narrative, portrait, anecdote, diatribe, scholarship, fantasy and moral philosophy. The title of Montaigne’s Essais (“attempts"), published in 1580, suggests the tentative and exploratory nature of this form as well as its freedom. The hallmark of the personal essay is its intimacy—the sharing of the writer’s observations and reflections with a reader, establishing a dialogue on subjects that range from the mundane to autobiographical and political meditations to reflections on abstract concepts and moral dilemmas. Style, shape, and intellectual depth lend the personal essay its drama, charm, and its ability to provoke thought. In this course, we will read and write personal essays that explore “persona,” “tone,” and “voice” in dialogue with concepts such as “the self,” “personal identity,” and “sincerity.” Readings may include essays by Seneca, Michel de Montaigne, Charles Lamb, George Orwell, Virginia Woolf, Wole Soyinka, Natalia Ginsburg, James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Alice Walker, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Gloria Anzaldua.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

WRTNG-UG1560 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Art and Craft of Poetry

4 units
Section 002
Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Scott Hightower

Description

In this workshop poets will focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer’s process. A weekly reading of a poem by each poet in the circle will serve as point of departure for discussion of the relationships of craft and expression. Each student will also briefly present a favorite poet/poem for the enjoyment and learning of the class. A final portfolio of poems is required at the end of the course.

Notes

Students may take "The Art and Craft of Poetry" two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

WRTNG-UG1560 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Art and Craft of Poetry

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Emily Fragos

Description

In this workshop poets will focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer’s process. A weekly reading of a poem by each poet in the circle will serve as point of departure for discussion of the relationships of craft and expression. Each student will also briefly present a favorite poet/poem for the enjoyment and learning of the class. A final portfolio of poems is required at the end of the course.

Notes

Students may take "The Art and Craft of Poetry" two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

ARTS-UG1211 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

Making Dance: Space, Place and Technology

4 units Wed
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Leslie Satin

Description

In this workshop, students will explore the possibilities of dancing across spatial categories, making dances in "real" and digital space. Taking our cues from contemporary experimental and primarily post-modern choreographers, we will examine how our arts practices and beliefs about bodies and space are linked to evolving ideas and cultural systems; we will ask questions that tug at the assumptions of what dance is, what bodies are, what space is, and how these elements are significant as components of choreography and of our dance experiences. We will make and watch dances ranging from low-tech works to high-tech virtual partnerships; most excitingly, we will collaborate on performance with a group of university students in Seoul, Korea. In addition to making dances, we will read about contemporary dance, technology, and other practices and disciplines (i.e., architecture, philosophy, neuroscience), view performances of choreographers and visual artists, and meet with practitioners engaged in the questions and practices of our study. Readings might include work by Gaston Bachelard, Matthew Frederick, Valerie Briginshaw, Merce Cunningham, Kent DeSpain, Andrew Gurian, Ivar Hagendoorn, Yi-Fu Tuan, and other artists and scholars. The course is open to all students: anyone interested in dance and/or technology is welcome. Note: all workshop members will be expected to participate as movers!

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1609 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
FA 2011

Dante's World

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Antonio Rutigliano

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1609

Description

This course will explore the social, political, intellectual and religious evolution of the late medieval dantesque world, by focusing on Dante’s Divine Comedy . A close reading of The Divine Comedy will serve as a forum to discuss and analyze Dante's writings and those important works that helped to shape the thirteenth-century Florentine society that ultimately served as a stepping stone for the humanist movement that paved the way for the Italian Renaissance. But Dante’s Divine Comedy is not just a text of and for its own time. It has left readers fascinated and shuddering for over 700 years because its poetical and literary tropes enable them to confront their experience of the human condition and transform what and how they desire. During the class, therefore, students will conduct research projects on more historical and more enduring aspects of Dante’s Commedia . As well, field trips to museums, cinematic recreations, documentaries, music and other visual and auditory aids will be used to enrich our sense of the text’s meaning and context. Readings include: The Divine Comedy, The Confessions, The Consolation of Philosophy, The Aeneid , and The Book of the Zohar .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1439 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

James Reese Europe and American Music

0 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

This course will examine the impact of James Reese Europe (1880-1919) on the development of American music in the early twentieth century. An innovative musician and conductor, Europe organized and conducted the first jazz concerts at Carnegie Hall (1912-1914), founded an African American music school, and served as a collaborator with Irene and Vernon Castle, who made social dancing a world-wide rage. During World War I, James Reese Europe led the all-black “Hellfighters” 15th Infantry Band, which performed throughout France and offered Europeans their first exposure to ‘le jazz hot.’ Readings may include A Life in Ragtime: A Biography of James Reese Europe by Reid Badger; excerpts from The Unknown Soldiers: African-American Troops in World War I by Arthur E. Barbeau and Florette Henri; From Harlem to the Rhine by Arthur W. Little; Black Manhattan by James Weldon Johnson; and They All Played Ragtime by Rudi Blesh and Harriet Janis. Sound and film recordings will also be utilized.

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, September 6–October 23.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CORE-GG2340 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2011

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master’s Thesis and Defense, K70.2335, are required to register for Thesis Advisement (1 credit) each semester (including the summer, if you plan on graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. This 1-credit course is not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master’s degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

Session I: May 23-July 1.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2011

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Session I: May 23-July 1. Deadline for submitting proposal is Monday, May 23.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2011

Private Lesson

4 units
Section 002

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Session II: July 5-August 12. Deadline for submitting proposal is Tuesday, July 5.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

ARTS-UG1620 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2011

Designing the Future City

4 units Mon Wed
5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Donna Goodman

Description

The 20th century city was transformed by several technological eras. The Machine Age, the Automobile Age, the Space Age, and the Information Age were among the important trends. Each innovation inspired new urban visions, such as Howard’s Garden City, Wright’s Broadacre City, Archigram’s Instant City, and Fuller’s Domed Manhattan. Films like Metropolis, Brazil, and Blade Runner provided critical visions. None of these designs produced real roadmaps for the future, but each contained interesting ideas. In the 21st century, architects and planners entered a new Environmental Era that introduced alternative energy, infrastructure, design, and planning to support sustainable development. This workshop explores new techniques in green architecture, landscape, art, and urban planning through films, readings, and lectures on cities worldwide. Using New York as a prototype, it also examines the evolution of urban transportation, land use, and social and environmental planning. Students develop several types of projects, such as the design of a green structure or roof terrace; planning analysis of a park or neighborhood in maps and diagrams, or a photographic essay on an urban issue. No experience is necessary, but students will need drawing tools and a camera.

Notes

Session II: July 5-August 12.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2011

Internship

4 units
Section 002

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City’s many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work an average of 10 to 20 hours each week at the site and meet regularly during the semester with their faculty adviser to discuss the internship. For each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship, students are expected to attend two workshops about internships; keep a journal of their daily internship experiences; submit a progress report describing the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Session II: July 5-August 12. Deadline for submitting proposal is Tuesday, July 5.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)