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Found 3405 courses
SASEM-UG9100 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

BERLIN: European Environmental Policy

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BERLIN. The course gives an introduction to various aspects of EU environmental policy making and policy implementation. After a brief recap of the basics of policy making in the EU, students will learn about the guiding principles and developments within EU environmental policy, the main actors and their interests in and influence on policy making. An optional part of the course might be a visit to the European House of the European Commission (EC) in Berlin where students either have the opportunity to role-play the decision-making process of the EC on the introduction of CO2-standards for cars or to engage in a debate with an EC representative. The second half of the course analyses EU environmental policies in different issue areas (e.g. climate change, biodiversity, waste) for their effectiveness in solving environmental problems. Different policy instruments are discussed for their merits and shortcomings (one example will be the EU Emissions Trading System) and linkages to other issue areas of EU policy making (e.g. industry and agriculture) are discussed. Finally, the course provides an international perspective on EU environmental policy making: sessions will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of EU environmental policy making at home and in international negotiations, compare it with US environmental politics, and discuss future challenges (e.g. EU enlargement) and trends for EU environmental governance.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1686 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2013

Self Fashioning in Literaure and Drama

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Jeanette Tran

Description

In 1980, literary critic Stephen Greenblatt coined the term “self-fashioning” to describe the 16th century phenomenon by which men in England developed an increasing self-consciousness about their ability to shape or “fashion” their identities. Anyone familiar with Shakespeare’s often quoted lines, “All the world’s a stage/ and all the men and women merely players,” has already received an introduction to this idea that identity is “fashion-able” or “performative.” Taking Greenblatt’s concept as a point of departure, this course explores identity and the concept of “self-fashioning” as it relates to performance. How does one fashion an identity, and how does knowledge of the theater inform our understanding of how identities are fashioned? What degree of autonomy does an individual have in fashioning his or her identity? How are our social, sexual, and racial identities mediated and shaped by our speech, our appearance, our institutions, and finally, our audiences? This course engages with both primary and secondary sources. Students examine early modern literature and drama alongside theories of performance from multiple disciplines. Authors include Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Castiglione, Pico della Mirandola, Erving Goffman, J.L Austin, and Judith Butler.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1661 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Total War, Terror and Critique

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
A.B. Huber

Description

There is currently a loud contest over what counts as terrorism, but there is also a quieter and wider crisis in our capacity to name and demarcate violence—the United States' and other's. It is no longer clear what counts as war, what constitutes a combatant, nor what kind of peace we might hope to make. What then can be said to confront, critique or rethink violence? We begin the seminar by familiarizing ourselves with the origins and logics of the Just War Theory (including Aristotle, Cicero, and Augustine) and we go on to consider the historical and philosophical contexts of Kant’s call for Perpetual Peace. But the seminar focuses primarily on critical theory’s engagement with the form and logics of modern warfare. Together we read work from the Frankfurt School in order to begin to reckon the relationship between politics, aesthetics, and violence. Finally, with the help of contemporary theorists (including Asad, Butler, Chow, Mamdani, Mahmood, Redfield) we turn toward questions of technology, terror, and the changing face of war in the twenty-first century. Can critique help us in anyway to abate violence or the anguish of its aftermath?

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1732 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Intermedia and Interdisciplinary Art Practices

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Meleko Mokgosi

Description

This seminar focuses on the development of interdisciplinary approaches in art practices from the 1960's to the present. Course material begins with Dick Higgins’ concept of ‘intermedia’, which was initially used to propose interdisciplinarity as the necessity of crossing genres, such as using painting, performance, video, film, poetry, and theatre as part of a viable artistic practice. By moving away from privileging one medium over another, this approach, which we explore, aimed at challenging notion of authenticity in art and erasing the boundary between producer and viewer as well as between linguistic and visual production. Consideration is then given to contemporary interdisciplinary methods. Course investigations are also framed by questions pertaining to the place of ethics and critical discourses in art; the shape and aesthetic that ‘critical’ art projects assume; as well as the relevance and limits of political and critical art projects in exhibition systems. In addition to reading texts from writers such as Amelia Jones, Hal Foster, Nicolas Bourriaud, Andrea Fraser, Liam Gillick, and Miwon Kwon, there will be visits to exhibitions within the city.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1031 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Scenic Design in the Performing Arts: Theatre, Dance, Film, and Television

4 units Mon
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Salvatore Tagliarino

Description

This course is an introduction to the principles and practice of theatrical scenic design. The vocabulary of visual imagery is woven into a history of theater, décor, and architecture and developed through the practice of graphic communication—the disciplines of drawing, painting and model building necessary for the expression of visual ideas in architecture, set, and lighting design. We explore how theatrical texts communicate in three-dimensional spaces and designs that respond to the author, director, and musical form (musical theater and opera). Students are expected to complete a series of scenic designs in models and two-dimensional presentations. Exercises integrate the principles of composition, value, color pattern, geometric form, and rhythm in the creation of three-dimensional shapes within a theatrical space—as in the sequence of acts or scenes in a drama. We deal in depth with the discipline of design skills, drafting and presentation craft as well as the reality of shop fabrication and load-in at the studio or theater. Although this is not a course in art direction for film and /or television, we discuss the differences in design for theater, film, and television.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1380 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

Three Revolutions: Haiti, Mexico, Cuba

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Antonio Lauria-Perricelli

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1380

Description

We compare and contrast the revolutionary events, processes and outcomes in Haiti, Mexico, and Cuba. None were simple reflexes of European or North American ideas and politics, although such external factors were among their causes and effects. Each had significant anti-colonial or anti-imperial components, as well as social and political conflicts and alliances within the immediate societies of the revolutionary countries which involved both "internal" and "external" groups and ideas. We consider the roles of such investors, landowners, mineowners, merchants, bankers, politicians, state administrators, peasants, laborers, intellectuals, migrants, and other social groups in-country or in the relevant imperial centers. We analyze interrelations among kinds of capitalism, and anti-capitalist ideologies or social forms and types of rationality; changing revolutionary processes and demands; changing role and organization of the state; the supporters or antagonists of the revolution among differing social groups at differing times; the revolution's relation to earlier and later movements. Where necessary, we invoke examples from other countries. Readings might include selections from Wolf, Peasant Wars of the Twentieth Century ; DuBois, Avengers of the New World ; Trouillot, Haiti: State Against Nation ; Sheller, various papers on gender, power and 19th century Haiti; Gonzales, The Mexican Revolution, 1910-1940 ; Olcott et al., Sex in Revolution: Gender, Politics, and Power in Modern Mexico ; Pérez Cuba, Between Reform and Revolution ; Kapcia, Cuba in Revolution: A History Since the Fifties ; Foran, Theories of Revolution , and later works.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CORE-GG2225 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Master's Thesis Seminar

4 units
Section 002
Mon
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Rosalind Fredericks

Description

This course engages students in the conceptual and technical processes leading to a thesis: articulating a core problem, reviewing appropriate literatures, designing effective methods, and constructing persuasive analyses. Through discussions of both published research articles and student work, the seminar examines the conventions of scholarly discourse, strategies of analysis and argumentation, and the ways in which writing can serve as a means to discover ideas. Students also learn academic writing skills; the conventions of scholarly discourse; strategies for building arguments; and the use of writing to explore ideas. Sections of the course focus on different thesis formats (research, artistic, project), but all take the student to the stage of preparing a thesis proposal.

Notes

Pass/fail only. Sec. 2 for the research or project thesis.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2225 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Master's Thesis Seminar

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM
Bella Mirabella

Description

This course engages students in the conceptual and technical processes leading to a thesis: articulating a core problem, reviewing appropriate literatures, designing effective methods, and constructing persuasive analyses. Through discussions of both published research articles and student work, the seminar examines the conventions of scholarly discourse, strategies of analysis and argumentation, and the ways in which writing can serve as a means to discover ideas. Students also learn academic writing skills; the conventions of scholarly discourse; strategies for building arguments; and the use of writing to explore ideas. Sections of the course focus on different thesis formats (research, artistic, project), but all take the student to the stage of preparing a thesis proposal.

Notes

Pass/fail only. Sec. 1 for the artistic thesis.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1589 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

The Vietnam War

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Hannah Gurman

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1589

Description

The Vietnam War occupies a special place in U.S history and foreign relations. For decades, it was known as America’s longest war, the only war the United States ever lost, a war that shattered Americans' faith in their government and spawned a culture of protests that divided one generation from another. More recently, it has become the conflict against which the U.S. wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya are most often compared and contrasted. In this course, we examine the history of the Vietnam War both in its own context and as part of ongoing debates about U.S. foreign policy and military interventions. In addition to considering the war from the U.S. perspective, we also read texts that offer insights into the Vietnamese experience. We cover a wide range of genres and disciplines, including: official documents written by Robert McNamara, George Ball, and Daniel Ellsberg; historical scholarship by Leslie Gelb, David Hunt, and Marilyn Young; and novels, films, and poetry of Eugene Burdick, Norman Mailer, Yusef Komunyaaka, and Tim O’Brien.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1719 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

China Gazing

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Chinnie Ding

Description

Ever since Marco Polo’s travels in the 13th century, China has provoked the Western imagination less as a place than a set of ideas—a cipher of difference and a test-case for universals. For thinkers from Leibniz to Sontag to Badiou, and in recent controversies around Ai Weiwei as much as FoxConn, determining how China and the Chinese are (or ought to be) like or unlike other states and cultures has sounded out essential questions about governance, human rights, civilizational progress, epistemology, and the bounds of fellow-feeling. Guided by the history of diplomatic, economic, and cultural exchanges between China and the Western world, this course is built around several key tropes that have persisted adaptively throughout that history, such as despotism and internationalism, the laboring body and the revolutionary masses. Our emphasis is on critical analysis of the political as well as the aesthetic imagination. Writing assignments consist of weekly response papers, a midterm essay, and a final research project. Readings span literature, history, political philosophy, critical theory, and travel writing. We also scrutinize several works of art, film, theatre, and performance.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1740 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Bridging Culture and Nature: An Introduction to Conservation Science

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Jim Tolisano

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1740

Description

This course brings together leading thinking from literature, anthropology, archeology, social psychology, economics, and biology to explore the art and science of applied conservation biology. The goal of conservation biology is to conserve the incredible diversity of life found on our planet, and, in the process, protect our rich cultural diversity, and ourselves. We discover how business entrepreneurs, social scientists, wildlife biologists, and artists all play an integral role in achieving practical conservation solutions. We begin with an exploration of our own relationship to the natural world. We examine what biological diversity is, the principal threats to biological systems, and specific actions that are being taken to reverse these threats and protect life on earth. We also explore the premise that managing the biological wealth of the planet really requires us to manage ourselves and the human cultures we have created. The fieldwork of the physical and biological sciences provide the foundation from which our work as conservation biologists proceeds. However, the applied work of the social sciences, education, business, humanities and arts then serve as the tools we need to manage ourselves and create a relationship with nature that is mutually supportive. Readings include reserved selections from textbooks, including Richard Primack’s Primer of Conservation Biology and Sarah Pilgrim’s Nature and Culture , along with others from popular non-fiction authors including Bill McKibben, Gary Snyder, Terry Tempest Williams and others. At the course conclusion students from all disciplines should see a role for themselves in the conservation work that is an essential part of our next century.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1628 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Think Big: Global Issues and Ecological Solutions

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Mitchell Joachim

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1628

Description

What are the most stimulating solutions to global climate change? If we were given an imaginary “client” with an unlimited budget and colossal power, what should we design? The resounding formula for green thinking is broadly interpreted in three meta-themes; apocalyptic, technological, and traditional. Each category promises solutions and/or interpretations of our current environmental calamity. We explore critical philosophical, artistic, and scientific positions in each meta-theme that help elucidate this dilemma. Students read, evaluate, and synthesize projects and texts from great minds such as; William Cronon, Bill McKibben, Bruce Mau, Mike Davis, Marshall McLuhan, Bjorn Lomborg, David Orr, Paul Virilio, Marshall Mclean , Laurence Buell, and others. The final project is the production of a mock Madison Avenue advertising campaign that promotes urban “sustainability.”

Notes

Open to sophomores only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG9450 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

SHANGHAI: Creative Writing

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-SHANGHAI. Shanghai is a city in radical flux, an historical East-West hybrid that is reinventing itself daily on an epic scale in the 21st century. Home now to some 18 million, counting the “floating population” of migrants, it is an easy place to “lose” oneself. Our exploration of Shanghai’s contemporary self-reinvention sets the scene for a visceral encounter with our rapidly changing world, selves, and places in it. If, like Shanghai, we reinvent ourselves in our season here—as writer, traveler, critic, perhaps even as cultural voyeur—what might we find? In this course, we will explore what it means to “lose” and then “find” oneself anew in this city—primarily as a writer, but also as a traveler from the West, an outsider inhabiting, and shifting among, different cultural identities. This investigation will bring us to look closely at Chinese and West¬ern writers’ works—fiction, creative nonfiction, travel writing, poetry, film and other genres—that use the city, and the experience of being “alien” or “other,” as a vital site of exploration of self, culture, identity and society.

Type

Global Programs (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1658 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Spies Like Us? Cold War Science as the Ultimate National Security Threat

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Jose Perillan

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1658

Description

On Friday June 19th, 1953 just before the sun set on Sing-Sing prison, Ethyl and Julius Rosenberg were executed by electrocution for their part in an espionage network that transferred classified information associated with top secret U.S. atomic research to the Soviet Union. This case was a landmark at the height of tensions associated with the second Red Scare of the 1940s and 50s, but the almost half-century of Cold War tensions, teetering on the brink of global annihilation, brought out the devastating threats of societal paranoia and political persecution. Throughout the Cold War period science was wielded by both the United States and the Soviet Union with alarming efficacy. As big science began to dominate international and domestic policy, the two superpowers played ‘chicken’ with an atomic arms race and ‘catch me if you can’ with a space race that seemed to fuel animosity and bring us ever closer to the brink of world catastrophe. In this seminar we use primary and secondary sources to examine the complex role of science during the Cold War, as weapon, threat, and salvation. Readings may include works by J.R. Oppenheimer, Deborah Cadbury, Albert Einstein, John Lewis Gaddis, John Earl Hayes, Harvey Klehr, and Jessica Wang among others.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG722 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Popular Religion and Popular Culture in North America

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Gregory Erickson

Syllabus

FIRST-UG722

Description

American religion, historian Nathan Hatch writes, has “less to do with the specifics of polity and governance and more with the incarnation of the church into popular culture.” Although Hatch was writing about the 19th century, this complex relationship between the popular and the liturgical continues to shape and define America today. In this course, we study and write about ways in which film, television, advertising, music, sports, politics, and the news media present, negotiate, and affect religious issues, and, conversely, how religion changes popular culture. We “read” primary texts of popular religion and popular culture, such as Billy Graham sermons, Mormon pageants, Madonna videos, baseball and video games, as well as theoretical works by Jean Baudrillard, Elaine Graham, Peter Williams, Kate McCarthy, Eric Mazur, Susan Mizruchi, Richard Santana and Gregory Erickson. Students are encouraged to explore topics of their own interest, and assignments include reaction papers, various essay forms, and individual research projects.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

GERM-UA240 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud

4 units
Section 002
Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

Description

This course examines the work of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three German authors who in different and decisive ways provided a radically new understanding of the notions of interpretation, history, the subject, politics, religion, and art. The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive engagement with and a dialogue between these three thinkers. The seminar underscores their prevailing actuality and thereby strives to delineate the origin of much modern thinking.

Type

CAS Course Sections Reserved for Gallatin Students (GERM-UA)

FIRST-UG746 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Fear and the Gothic

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Bridget McFarland

Description

Why do some stories scare us? This course seeks to define and examine fear by reading scary stories defined as gothic. The course begins with the birth of the "Gothic" novel in Great Britain and traces the genre's evolution during the revolutionary turmoil of the 1790s. In addition to reading the gothic as a response to a shifting political landscape, we consider the extent to which the gothic's ability to inspire fear and produce a sensory response relates to the goals of the Enlightenment. How does gothic literature test the limits of empiricism and question the authority of sensory experience? How and why do works of gothic literature succeed in creating fear? We read canonical works of the gothic, including drama, short stories, horror ballads, and a satirical send-up of the genre . Readings may include M.G. Lewis' The Monk and Castle Spectre, Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, Miles Peter Andrews' The Enchanted Castle, Edgar Allan Poe's The Fall of the House of Usher, Washington Irving's Legend of Sleepy Hollow and selected ballads such as "The Children in the Wood," "Tam Lin," and "Sweet William's Ghost."

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1342 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Language, Globalization and the Self

4 units Mon
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Maria-Luisa Achino-Loeb

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1342

Description

This course is intended as an exploration of language as vehicle for processes of globalization. What role did language play in the changes wrought by early capitalist transformations and the colonial expansion? Conversely, how have these global changes affected localized communities and the languages that identify them? And why should we care? To answer these questions we examine how the colonial experience has given rise to value-laden linguistic practices that mirror and sustain the racializing of privilege; and how the experience of language-loss encountered by voluntary and involuntary migrants can attack the integrity of the self. While ultimately concerned with language, our discussions have a wide scope ranging from issues of political economy to collective consciousness and individual psychology. Readings include Achino-Loeb's Silence: The Currency of Power , Anderson's Imagined Communities , Wolf's Europe and the People Without History , Hoffman's Lost in Translation , Dangarembga's Nervous Conditions , Richard Rodriguez’ Hunger of Memory as well as selected excerpts from other sources.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1011 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Voicing the Text

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Jessie Austrian

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1011

Description

In this class we study vocal and performance technique, as well as the art of rhetoric and its history. We put these two studies together to practice and investigate how to communicate thought and how to evoke pathos, understanding and action from our audiences. Students discuss, analyze and perform texts from classic and modern plays and poetry, as well as ancient and contemporary political texts. This course asks questions such as: What is the difference between text that is intended to be heard versus text which is intended to be read? How do the musical qualities of the voice (such as tone, timbre and inflection) affect the content and reception of the message? How does a performer give voice to a playwright's words? How do our vocal habits affect our ability to communicate clearly? How we can use our natural voices to their best and most profound effect?

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG727 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Sense and Consensus

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Chinnie Ding

Description

Blink. Sniff. Tickle. Eavesdrop. Slurp. We experience the world through our senses. To make sense of what we sense is to navigate between feeling and knowing, immediacy and otherness, idiosyncrasy and consensus. Whether deprivation or overload, sensory experience at once invites description and eludes understanding, challenging writers and scientists alike. This class explores the mechanics as well as the poetics of perception. Students develop individual research topics from diverse disciplines, such as literature, music, neuroscience, art, philosophy, and mysticism. Color, pain, synesthesia, umami, disgust, the sublime, phantom limbs, and "non-lethal" weaponry are some phenomena we look into. Readings may include works by Franz Kafka, Isadora Duncan, J.K. Huysmans, Gertrude Stein, Marcel Proust, Caroline Walker Bynum, Oliver Sacks, and Virginia Woolf. Films and excursions supplement the readings.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1718 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Hegel: Spirit, History and Forgiveness

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Justin Holt

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1718

Description

German Idealist thinker G.W.F. Hegel's views of historical and cultural change have been tremendously influential. Hegel asks us to consider: is there a logic to historical development? Can human knowledge ever be complete? Is a past of domination required for a future of freedom? Hegel raises these questions, and more, in The Phenomenology of Spirit . This course introduces students to this seminal work, exploring Hegel's ideas about the development of civilization, the nature of knowledge, the status of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution as projects of intellectual and political liberation, and the prospect of forgiveness for historical wrongs. We also look at some other works that draw on similar themes, such as Kant's Perpetual Peace and Sophocles' Antigone.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9102 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

BERLIN: Topics in German Cinema

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BERLIN. Course description coming soon.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

INDIV-UG1701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, February 1. To register, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1072 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Poets in Protest: Footsteps to Hip-Hop

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

This seminar examines the tradition of poetic protest in the African Diaspora. From the Harlem Renaissance and Négritude to the Black Liberation Movement of the 60's and today's Hip-Hop/Rap explosion, poets, lyricists and rap/hip-hop artists have sought to reclaim and reshape images of themselves and their communal experiences. Through comparative and critical analysis of historical works, songs, and poetry, we come to a deeper understanding of the common thematic and aesthetic approaches of these movements as they continue to alter the discourse on race and liberation. Texts may include Michael Richardson, ed., Refusal of the Shadow: Surrealism and the Caribbean ; David L. Lewis, ed., The Portable Harlem Renaissance Reader ; Tricia Rose, Black Noise ; films such as Euzhan Palcy, Sugar Cane Alley , and Tony Silver and Henry Chalfant, Style Wars ; and samples from Langston Hughes, NWA, Amiri Baraka, Nikki Giovanni, KRS-One, OutKast, Dead Prez, Public Enemy, and Tupac Shakur.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CORE-GG2115 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Review of the Literature

3 units

Description

Before starting the thesis, students are required to conduct an independent study—usually with their adviser— in which they find, read and critique a substantial body of scholarship related to the thesis. The purpose of this independent study is to ensure that the student is familiar with the previous scholarly work that forms a context for the thesis. The required work for Review of the Literature is a critical essay and a bibliography. The aim of the essay is to identify the categories of pertinent studies; report on major concepts, theories, debates, trends, and gaps in the field; and place the thesis topic in relation to earlier studies. The adviser sets the length of the paper, but it is typically more than 25 pages. Students may take Review of the Literature before the Master's Thesis Seminar as a way of exploring the broad literatures in the student's field or topic and to use the study as a way of generating a researchable question for the thesis. It is also possible to take Review of the Literature simultaneously with the Master's Thesis Seminar when the student is fairly clear about the research question, but may need some background development and can use Review of the Literature as a way of deepening knowledge in the specific domain of the thesis. A student may also take Review of the Literature after the Master's Thesis Seminar when he or she already has a well-developed research question and wants to dig deeply into the specific literatures related to that question. For more details about Review of the Literature, please visit Gallatin's website.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, February 1. To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1299 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Objectivity and the Politics of the Journalism Revolution

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Paul Thaler

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1299

Description

At the birth of this nation, it was assumed by journalists and their readers that journalists were partisans, telling stories from particular points of view. But the growth of the modern newspaper combined with the ideals of science transformed the image, self-image, and practice of journalism, which now claims to worship at the altar of objectivity, to present information or “news” without bias. This ethic has carried over to the contemporary media, despite challenges from critics. Rather than multiple media outlets presenting different optics or lenses through which to see events and their contexts, media outlets claim to speak impartially. In this course we examine this ideal or promise: is it possible? desirable? To pursue this inquiry we consider challenges to objectivity by figures such as Truman Capote, who linked a “new journalism” to a personal point of view, Robert McChesney, whose corporate media perspective provides a powerful macro analysis of modern journalism, and Jay Rosen, who articulates the postmodern shifts brought on by the Internet that have redefined and realigned the relationship between the journalist and audience. Readings include Walter Lippmann, John Dewey, Tom Wolfe, Michael Herr, Eric Alterman, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, and Ben Bagdikian.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Aesthetics in Context

4 units Tue Thu
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Christopher Trogan

Syllabus

FIRST-UG701

Description

What is beauty? Why is it so powerful? What attracts us to someone or something beautiful? Is beauty an objective feature of things, or is it determined by cultural context and personal preference? Although beauty inspired enormous attention from antiquity to the twentieth century, much of modern art, literature, and philosophy considered beauty insignificant and, in some cases, even reacted vehemently against it. This course recognizes the significance of beauty and its enormous influence on our lives. It approaches the issue through an examination of the way in which philosophers, artists, writers, psychologists, cultural historians, and biologists have understood the term. It also considers the intersection of beauty and politics. Texts may include works by Arthur Danto, Charles Baudelaire, Immanuel Kant, Thomas Mann, Plato, Nancy Etcoff, Susan Bordo, and other contemporary figures.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1059 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Disease and Civilization

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Gene Cittadino

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1059

Description

This course explores the cultural, social, scientific, and political dimensions of epidemic disease through an examination of selected episodes from plagues in antiquity to AIDS, Ebola, avian flu, and bioterrorism in our time. We approach the problem of understanding the role of disease in human history from two different, but interrelated, perspectives: an ecological perspective, making use of a combination of environmental, biological, and cultural factors to help explain the origin and spread of epidemics, and a cultural/social history perspective, emphasizing the interaction of cultural values, religious beliefs, scientific knowledge, medical practice, economics, and politics in shaping perceptions of the nature, causes, cures, and significance of various diseases. Readings range from Thucydides and the Hippocratic writings to Boccaccio, Defoe, and Orwell, including, where possible, nonwestern sources, along with a variety of recent works that discuss the historical, social, and biological aspects of epidemic disease in different cultural and geographical settings.

Notes

Section 3 for Environmental Studies majors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1493 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Sports, Race and Politics

4 units Wed
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Millery Polyné

Description

Beyond spectacular touchdowns and walk-off grand slams, sport remains a vital institution for analyzing the ideological/theoretical frameworks of nationalism, diplomacy, economic development, corruption, gender and race. From Joe Louis's historic fight against Max Schmeling in June 1936 to the role of FIFA's World Cup played in South Africa's structural development, sport should be understood beyond masculine bravado, violence and the joy and agony of competition, but also as a serious vehicle for conceptualizing and analyzing the triumphs and limitations of our society and its complicated history. This course examines sports (baseball, boxing, soccer, basketball and cricket), primarily from a U.S. and Latin American context, during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In what ways do these sports reify concepts of race and gender? How is it utilized as a tool of diplomatic relations? We read key articles and seminal books in the field of the sport studies that illuminate the significance of sport in shaping culture and politics in our global society.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9151 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

BUENOS AIRES: Myths, Icons, and Invented Traditions: A Cultural History of Latin America

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. Mitos, íconos y tradiciones inventadas is an advanced conversation course, which seeks to make students familiar with the rich and complex history of Latin America through the study of some of its most known and iconic cultural expressions. It does also work as an introductory map to the most influential and widespread approaches in Latin American social sciences, cultural studies and literary criticism. Thus, students will not only have a first encounter with key historical processes that lie behind some well know cultural icons, but also will be introduced to arguments and ways of writing that help constitute modern Latin American educated Spanish. The course will be structured in seven topics; each topic will be covered in two weeks. During these four classes, students will be exposed to different kinds of cultural materials, including literary texts, film, papers from several disciplines, theater plays, art shows and live concerts.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9352 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

PARIS: Topics in French Literature: Paris Modern Literature & Art

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PARIS. Course description coming soon.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

FIRST-UG745 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Thought Crimes: Criminal Intent in Law, Literature and Society

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Kathleen Smith

Syllabus

FIRST-UG745

Description

The concept of mens rea or criminal intent is a relatively new legal innovation, dating from the Middle Ages. Why did jurists and philosophers begin to recognize the mind, and specifically intent, as an important site of transgression? And how did this revolution in theories of morality shift the focus away from action in order to promote theories of innocence or guilt based on intent? By reading Augustine and Abelard as well as ancient legal codes, we study the origins of the creation of a moral self that was based on the mind, as opposed to observable actions. The poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer offers an important example of how writers of the period used the idea of individual intent to develop literary character and to represent human subjectivity. Medieval plays that represent the thought crimes of Satan also provide a platform for thinking about intention and religious or intellectual dissent. We also explore how studying the roots of these concepts can help us understand the modern world. We examine, for example, the related problems of just intent in just war theory from its medieval origins to its presence in current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. We read recent literary works by authors such as Junot Díaz and Alice Munro as a way to study intention as both a problematic and a defining element of culpability and the moral self. Finally, modern theories of intention and morality from philosophers and neuroscientists offer additional theoretical lenses for analyzing the semester’s readings. These topics form the basis for several short writing assignments and a major research paper.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1451 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2013

Ancient Reflections in a Time of Modern War

2 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Laura Slatkin

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1451

Description

In this class we explore ancient Greek attitudes toward war, as represented in epic, drama, and historiography. Among the topics we consider are: rhetoric and rationales for and against war; war and social cohesion; war and empire; the stakes of civil war; war and gender; the social costs of war; the implications for our contemporary situation. Readings may include, Homer, Iliad ; Sophocles, Ajax ; Aeschylus Seven Against Thebes ; Euripides, Iphigeneia in Aulis and Trojan Women ; Aristophanes, Peace ; Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War ; and twentieth century mediations on the problematic of war, such as Elaine Scarry, The Body in Pain ; Jonathan Shay, Achilles in Vietnam ; Simone Weil, The Iliad, or the poem of force .

Notes

Course meets 1/29- 3/12 only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1646 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

Fractured States: Border Crossings, Divisions, and Partitions

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Valerie Forman

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1646

Description

This course explores what happens when geographical spaces get divided and people are dislocated, forced to migrate, or become part of a new political entity. We focus on these geographical divisions both as larger political crises and as events that have effects at more personal and local levels, for example, on familial ties, the ability to find work, or to practice one's religion. We focus on a few regions whose borders have been and still are in crisis in different ways: Haiti and the Dominican Republic; India and Pakistan; and Israel and Palestine. Some specific questions we explore: In what ways do geographical borders participate in the creation of national, racial, or religious, identities? What happens to individuals or groups of people who live in a nation to which they do not feel a primary allegiance and to people who have multiple allegiances? In what ways do borders facilitate or demand the production of social difference? How do writers imagine the relationship of subjects to divided spaces and the relationship of those subjects to each other? How do fictional and historical works address the relationships between possibilities for peace and security and notions of justice? The class focuses primarily on literary texts and narrative films, which we place in dialogue with oral histories, personal memoir, and documentary films. Some likely authors we read in the course include: Edwige Danticat, Junot Díaz, Salman Rushdie, Sami Michael, and Ghassan Kanafani.

Notes

Same as COLIT-UA 800 001.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1734 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2013

Renaissance and Renewal in the 9th Century

2 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Andrew Romig

Description

The European Early Middle Ages may seem an unlikely place to find a renaissance. In our popular imagination, the era remains a foreign and backward place, a “Dark Age”: its systemic violence, its brutal social injustices, and its intellectual and artistic poverty. In fact, however, the Early Middle Ages of Europe was far more diverse and vibrant than our common narratives of the “brutish” medieval past suggest. In this course, we focus on the long 9th century, which saw a proliferation of scholarship and art under the patronage of Charlemagne and his heirs that in some ways harkened back to artistic world of imperial Rome. Carolingian courts became centers of learning, bringing the finest thinkers of Europe together in conversation, and recalling the aesthetics of the ancient world while also forging new styles and forms of scientific thought and artistic creation. Carolingian rulers engaged diplomatically with the world beyond—not just England and Scandinavia beyond the North Sea, but Muslim Spain and Baghdad, Jerusalem, and North Africa. In important ways, the Carolingian renaissance paved the way for the inventions and revolutions of the later Middle Ages and beyond. It thus provides a key early comparative example for the study of “renaissances” in all eras. No previous coursework required. Texts may include Einhard’s Life of Charlemagne , the “Coronation Gospels,” The Utrecht Psalter, the Heliand , and the Waltharius .

Notes

Course meets 1/28- 3/11 only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CLI-UG1466 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Policy, Community, and Self

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Eric Brettschneider

Syllabus

CLI-UG1466

Description

Intended to introduce policy, this course includes an internship at a policy and /or advocacy organization. Community building, service integration and child welfare are featured in readings, discussion, and internships. Through examples such as ethnic matching placements in foster care, zero tolerance approaches to drug abuse, or public financing of political campaigns, students come to understand how government, schools, gangs, religious institutions and families can, with varying degrees of explicitness and formality, all make policy. Students at the course conclusion are able to: identify policies within their lives; argue all sides of a policy question; appreciate the importance of evidence; and distinguish implementation from formulation. Readings include Bowling Alone , by Robert Putnam, and The Lost Children of Wilder , by Nina Bernstein. Students will be helped to connect meetings they attend and the policy concepts taught and discussed in class. The goal is to leave no student unaware of the importance of policy in their own and their community's life. The course focuses on policies that are empowering. Assignments include an internship journal.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

IDSEM-UG1720 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Artificial and the Natural

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Myles Jackson

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1720

Description

When we hear the story about molecular biologists inserting a gene responsible for luminosity taken from a lightning bug into a tobacco or strawberry plant, we tend to be repulsed, declaring that such a move is ‘unnatural.’ Yet when we see cows grazing on the Great Plains, or a beautiful array of flowers at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, we praise the beauty of nature. However, flowers and cattle are just as ‘artificial’ as the genetically modified tobacco or strawberry plant. After all, they are the products of centuries of breeding, artificially selecting for traits, which nature itself did not. Likewise, why should a chemical polymer or dye derived from a natural substance, such as carbon, be any more (or less) artificial than a genetically modified mouse programmed to succumb to cancer? Finally, why are we awestruck when we hear about IBM’s Big Blue defeating one of the greatest chess player of the century, Gary Kasparov, yet we are deeply concerned with and troubled by the attempts of scientists and engineers to devise computers, which may one day mimic human attributes, such as consciousness? The goal of this course is to study the debate in the West from Aristotle to the present and explore its socio-political, philosophical, economic and scientific ramifications. This course may be counted toward the science requirement. Readings include Aristotle’s Metaphysics and Meteorology , Essays by Grafton, Newman, and Bensaude-Vincent in The Natural and the Artificial ; Shapin, The Scientific Revolution , Riskin on automata, Goethe, N. Hawthorne, E. A. Poe, Freud, Turing, Fullwiley (race and genes) and Jackson (gene patenting).

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1027 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Performing the Self in Society

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Lenora Champagne

Description

This is a class in solo performance composition primarily for performers, dancers and for students interested in performance art and its histories. Participants develop a solo performance through a series of exercises using memory, movement and written and visual imagery, and explore the associative strategies of collage and pastiche as methodologies for structuring material. The solos emerge from a process involving improvisation (movement and text), composing, and revision of material. Readings include performance texts by prominent artists, essays on performance, and video viewings, which foreground the tendency in performance to explore subjectivity and identity in light of social and political critique. Required texts include Jo Bonney’s Extreme Exposure , C. Carr's On Edge: Performance at the End of the Twentieth Century, and Lenora Champagne’s Out from Under: Texts by Women Performance Artists . Additional readings include Colin Counsell, "Postmodernism and Performance Art," Roselee Goldberg, "Performance: A Hidden History," Jonathan Kalb, "Documentary Solo Performance: The Politics of the Mirrored Self," and an essay by Coco Fusco. Assignments include a solo performance created from the material developed in class (rather than "polishing" an already created piece), along with a written analysis of two live solo performances, and an oral presentation. Strategies learned in this class are also useful for composing group work.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

SASEM-UG9550 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
SP 2013

TEL AVIV: The Present Past: Archaeology and History of the Land of Israel and its Relevance for Today

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-TEL AVIV. The course examines the archaeological findings, the biblical text and ancient Near Eastern records in an attempt to reconstruct the history of ancient Israel in the first Millennium BCE. The study of ancient Israel in biblical times attracts the imagination of millions around the world. Biblical accounts on kings such as David and Solomon are at the heart of most cultures today and it is no wonder that pure academic debates about the historicity of these biblical accounts echoes into public realm. Can we use archaeology and biblical scholarship in order to reconstruct a better image of these decisive events? Five currently hotly debated subjects in biblical history will be discussed with the students in class meetings, in field trips and with the help of guest speakers who will present their side of the argument.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1212 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

World Dance

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Kathryn Posin

Description

Dance reflects cultural heritage and is a key to understanding diverse societies. In this arts workshop, students explore dance as it appears on several continents. Dance can be seen as encoded forms of a society's religious, artistic, political, economic, and familial values. Readings cover issues of globalization, fusion and authenticity. Migration, missionaries, trade routes and the diaspora have led to the creation of new dance forms like "Bollywood" and "Tribal" that are a synthesis of earlier forms. Students are introduced to different dance forms through selected readings, rich collection of video footage and studio practice often lead by various guest artists. After a brief warm-up, the class learns simple steps, floor plans and rhythms from the music and dance cultures being studied. Students choose a dance form as their project and themselves become researchers, performers and creators of new forms.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1116 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2013

Fate and Free Will in the Epic Tradition

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Antonio Rutigliano

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1116

Description

The role of the gods in human affairs inevitably raises the question of fate and free will. The epics, from the ancient world to the Renaissance, frequently reflect and define this debate. This course examines how the epics of Homer, Vergil, Dante and Milton not only mirror the philosophical and theological perceptions of the period, but sometimes forecast future debates on the issue. Readings may include the Epic of Gilgamesh, Iliad or Odyssey , Aeneid , and Divine Comedy , as well as selections from Plato's Protagoras or Aristotle's Ethics , Cicero's De Fato , Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy , and Fromm's Escape From Freedom .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1301 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Advanced Creative Nonfiction

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Cris Beam

Description

This is a course for students with some experience in reporting, researching and writing nonfiction, who want to experiment in literary, long-form journalism. Students choose a small culture or community on which to focus throughout the semester. We’ll start by writing one profile of a member of this community, developing interviewing skills, and learning about voice and point of view. We’ll also write a reflective piece on interrogating the ways we explore this community without exploiting, exoticizing or oversimplifying our sources. Then students move on to one major work of literary feature-writing—the bulk of the semester’s work—which is written in sections and go through several revisions. Borrowing the best tools from fiction writing—like character development, a strong arc, and engaging scenes—these features will be rich in narrative and as complex as the communities they portray. Students learn advanced re-porting techniques, story organization and editing skills, and debate the ethical issues inherent to truth-gathering. Readings likely include Joseph Mitchell, Katherine Boo, Alex Kotlowitz, Leon Dash, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc and Peter Hessler.

Notes

Suggested prerequisite WRTNG-UG 1300 or CRWRI-UA 825, CRWRI-UA 850 or permission of instructor.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1318 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2013

Shakespeare and the London Theatre

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Bella Mirabella

Description

In this class we take a visit to London in the years 1590 to 1616, in search of Shakespeare and the London in which he lived and wrote. During this period, London at the height of its Renaissance power, was a center of dramatic arts unparalleled in the rest of Europe. Volumes of plays were written, theaters were built all over London, and each day, during the season, those theaters were filled with audiences who were drawn from every social and economic class and both genders. Theater was a craze. It was the center of cultural life in London. And in the center of this remarkably, vibrant creative world, Shakespeare was a superstar. We examine the city of London, Shakespeare, and theater from literary, historical, political and cultural perspectives. Our consideration of the theater is in relation to other forms of popular entertainment, such as singing, dancing and mountebank performances, and how they might have influenced Shakespeare. We read a selection of plays written by Shakespeare such as As You Like It, Much Ado About Nothing, Richard III, Othello , and Measure for Measure . We also see film versions of some of the plays and go to the New York theatre.

Notes

Same as MEDI-UA 986 001.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9251 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

LONDON: Art and War, 1914-2004

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. This 15 week course will take an in-depth yet wide-ranging look at an important but curiously neglected aspect of modern western visual culture. Within a broadly chronological structure, topics to be dealt with will include the following: the relationship between art and atrocity, and the attendant problem of the aestheticisation of horror; the crucial influence of photography and the growth of mass communications; the issue of censorship, both external and internal, and the related issue of the "limits of representation" (above all, in relation to the Holocaust and Hiroshima); the distinction between official and unofficial war art, and between art and propaganda, between art that endorses and even glorifies war and an art of protest; issues of gender and sexuality; questions of cultural memory and the memorialization process, and the representation of war in contemporary art practice. It will consist of a combination of informal lectures, student presentations, at least one gallery visit, and the occasional film showing.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1735 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

American Narratives II

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
George Shulman

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1735

Description

The goal of this course is to create a conversation between post world war two North American literature, and contemporary political theory. We focus especially on the relationship between theorists making arguments using the genre of the treatise or monograph, and literary artists dramatizing protagonists acting in fictional worlds. What theoretical and political difference do differences of genre make in how readers (and citizens) apprehend and act in the world? But we also pursue more substantive questions. First, how is politics (and the meaning of democracy) represented and recast? Second, how do literary artists and theorists view the political role of language in the world, compared to the ways they use language in their texts? Third, how are issues of race and gender addressed? Fourth, what is the relationship between re-imagining (and redeeming) American nationhood, and in contrast, investing in post- (or anti-) national identifications? "Theorists" include Norman O. Brown, Sheldon Wolin, Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Jacques Ranciere, Lauren Berlant, Kimberlee Crenshaw, and Eve Sedgwick; literary artists include Thomas Pynchon, Norman Mailer, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Allan Ginsberg, Margaret Atwood, Toni Morrison, Phillip Roth.

Notes

Prerequisite IDSEM-UG 1592 or IDSEM-UG 1712 or IDSEM-UG 1475, or permission of the instructor.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ELEC-GG2548 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Storytelling: Writing Techniques for Fiction and Nonfiction

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Christopher Bram

Syllabus

ELEC-GG2548

Description

Whether you are writing fiction or nonfiction, story is an important part of prose. Story here is just another name for sequence and structure. Learning the right order for your sentences, paragraphs, and pages is as invaluable as learning how to put one foot in front of the other when learning to walk. In this course we will explore different ways to lay out actions and ideas, whether you're writing a novel, a book of history, an opinion piece, an essay or a short story. We will examine the best ways to make notes and sketch out early drafts as you find your voice and structure. You will gain practice in rewriting. And we will look at some of the different approaches to voice and narrative, reading such writers as Milan Kundera, Janet Malcolm, Truman Capote, Sigrid Nunez, and Primo Levi. Students will be expected to submit for workshop two separate projects, one work of fiction and another of nonfiction, in at least two drafts each, which we will discuss in class. In the end you are expected to produce a minimum of forty finished pages.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (chris.bram@yahoo.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

SASEM-UG9401 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

PRAGUE: Kafka and His Contexts

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. "A book must be an ax for the frozen sea in us," wrote Franz Kafka (1883-1924), one of the best known but least understood authors of our times. In this course, we will break some of the clichés which are stuck to Kafka's life and work and dive into the fascinating, intricate and profoundly humorous world of his thoughts and emotions. In Prague, the city that determined and held Kafka in its "claws", we will trace the possible sources of the writer's private obsessions which became the general characteristics of modern men: The sense of isolation, the anxiety, the self-irony, the sense of responsibility and guilt, the quest for freedom, the struggle of an individual against the system. We will read selected works of Kafka, but also Meyrink - the author of Prague ghetto - and Milan Kundera. This course aims to bring the students to a point from which they can find their own genuine and intimate understanding of Kafka's writing.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1573 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The New American Society

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Laurin Raiken

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1573

Description

Until 2007-08 we took for granted that in the past sixty years following World War II, the industrialized Western world experienced unprecedented economic expansion, and the United States was economically and geopolitically.” the dominant superpower, indeed America was the primary coordinator and beneficiary of the post World War II period. Only a few keen observers detected economic flaws or geopolitical vulnerability in what has been called “The American Century.” Since the mid-1970s however, there have been enormous changes in the United States and the world. New forms of violence, major economic shifts and geopolitical reversals have seriously undermined and changed the world order and particularly American lives and even more pointedly the lives of American youth. Recently the self-destruction and breakdown of the U.S. financial and economic systems triggered a deep global destabilization and The Great Recession. For a growing number of Americans life has become the equivalent to the severe dislocations of the Great Depression of the 1930s. With this broad historical are in view, this seminar offers a critical history of Post World War II America, focusing especially on major social, political, ideological, extremist “teavangelical” obstructionist aggression and the world historical economic collapse. Readings include social and political thinkers such as C. Wright Mills, Barrington Moore Jr., Hannah Arendt, and Arthur J. Vidich and economists such as, John Maynard Keynes, Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, the essayist John Lanchester, and Nobel Laureates Paul Krugman and Joseph Stieglitz. We read “Ill Fares the Land,” by the late New York University historian Tony Judt, and be inspired by the work of the great world class political economist and unsung American radical thinker, Thorstein Veblen. How do the emerging realities of today portend the future?

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1717 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Keynesian Century

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Andrew Bossie

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1717

Description

This class explores the intellectual history of economics during the 20th Century, and particularly the central economist of that century: John Maynard Keynes. What factors led to the ascendency of Keynesian economics during the middle of the 20th Century? What role did historical events such as the Great Depression, World War II, the Vietnam War and Stagflation play in determining this ascendance? What did the new, post-WWII technocratic class take from Keynes and what did they ignore? What led economists to largely disavow Keynes’ insights towards the end of the 20th Century? What does “Keynesian economics” even mean? We also examine works from the various schools of economic thought that emerged during the 20th century, all of which—in no small part—defined themselves either in support of or in opposition to Keynes’s ideas . Readings also include selections from Joan Robinson, Fredrick Hayek, Robert Lucas, Milton Friedman David Harvey, James Tobin, John Kenneth Galbraith and others.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9200 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

FLORENCE: History of Italian Fashion

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. Students trace the birth, evolution, decline, revival, and most recent developments of Italian fashion from the Late Gothic Age to the present "made in Italy" design. Italian fashion styles are decoded in relation to art history in an international, social and economic context. Fashion and its connections with culture, subculture, gender and communication are emphasized. On-site visits also illustrate the dominating role of Florence in fashion from its origin until now. Conducted in English.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel , Urry’s The Tourist Gaze, MacCannell’s The Tourist , and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: travel-studies.com.

Notes

Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site during Spring 2013.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

WRTNG-UG9150 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

BUENOS AIRES: Creative Writing: Argentina, Travel Writing at the End of the World

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. A practical course in the writing of creative literary texts: prose (short stories as well as literary non-fiction) and poetry. Selected published works will be analyzed in class both to provide inspiration for student writing as well as to represent literary structures and strategies. Writing assignments ranging from spontaneous to long-term projects will promote creative exploration and self-expression. Critical skills are emphasized and enhanced as students respond to each others’ work. Awareness of correct conventional use of the English language will be upheld. Students build up a body of work over the semester. For full credit and in demonstration of a writing “process,” the final portfolios should include both first drafts and subsequent revisions. At least one longer text (or set of poems) will be selected for submission as would be appropriate to publishers or literary contests.

Type

Global Programs (WRTNG-UG)

WRTNG-UG1550 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Fiction Writing

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Anthony Tognazzini

Description

This course provides students interested in writing fiction an opportunity to explore and discuss various forms of fiction writing in a workshop environment. The main objective of the course is to help students develop and revise their own works of fiction, and in the process hone individual styles and voices. One route to this goal is an inquiry into a range of techniques available to contemporary fiction writers. Emphasis is on characterization, structure, setting, narrative cohesion, and prose. A variety of the craft aspects of fiction writing are explored through exercises focused on narrative voice, plot, tension, time, sequence, dialogue, and other issues that arise in student work. Students present their own fiction, respond to the writings of others, and pose questions about literature, editing, and publishing, all within the supportive and responsive environment of the workshop group.

Notes

Students may take Fiction Writing two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

CLI-UG1460 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Literacy in Action

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Dianne Ramdeholl

Description

This course combines volunteer work in New York City adult literacy and English as a second language programs with an academic introduction to the philosophy, history, and current issues of adult literacy. An important emphasis of the class is to critically examine adult literacy through a social justice lens. Students work as volunteer teachers of reading and writing oral English or mentors at such institutions as the University Settlement, International Rescue Committee, Turning Point, and Fortune Society. In class they read about and discuss such key issues as adult literacy education policy and the impact on the field - including instruction, implications of being marginalized by educational systems, instructional approaches developed for adults; and the steps that might be taken to build support for high-quality, adult basic-skills programs. Throughout the course, students relate such issues to their own on-site experiences in class discussion and role-playing, and create a portfolio of writing that includes on-site observations, lesson plans, reflections, and a final analytical paper. Readings may include Making Meaning, Making Change (Auerbach); We Make the Road by Walking (Horton and Freire); Pedagogy of the Oppressed (Freire), as well as other articles and journals ( Focus on Basics and The Change Agent ).

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

IDSEM-UG1721 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Performativity and the Power of Words

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Luke Fleming

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1721

Description

The common expression, "Sticks and stones will break my bones but words will never hurt me," encapsulates a Euro-American understanding of language in which "real" actions are thought to contrast with "mere" words. And yet, as legal cases concerning hate speech, or controversies surrounding curse words on television make clear, despite our beliefs that they should not, words nevertheless do have powerful effects in the world. Indeed, language not only describes the world, it also acts on it. The concept of "performativity"—the idea that language not only describes things, but does things—has become increasingly important to understanding this, the power of words. This course gives students a solid grounding in the different understandings and orientations towards the idea of "performativity." We look at the social organization of powerful words expanding the philosophical account of speech as action to include more socially grounded accounts. Case-studies range from early anthropological work on magical, ritual and taboo speech, to contemporary work on hate speech and "gender performativity." Readings include J.L. Austin How to Do Things with Words ; J. Butler Excitable Speech ; J. Favret-Saada Deadly Words: Witchcraft in the Bocage .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9403 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

PRAGUE: Central European Film

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. This interdisciplinary seminar is designed to discuss and question the identity of specific nations in European space, which has always been a fascinating crossroad of ideas and ideologies as well as the birthplace of wars and totalitarian systems. The course will cover masterpieces of Russian, Hungarian, German, Polish and Czech cinematography, focusing on several crucial periods of history, in particular WWII and its aftermath, showing moral dilemmas of individuals and nations under the Nazi regime as well as revealing the bitter truth of the Stalinist years.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1042 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Digital Revolution: History of Media III

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Stephen Duncombe

Description

We are in the midst of a revolution. Computers permeate nearly every aspect of our life, yet we understand relatively little about how they work, their historical development, and their impact on our thought and actions. As with previous technological and communications revolutions like the rise of print and the ascendency of the image, computing is transforming our economic and political landscape, bringing with it new possibilities as well as new problems. In this course we explore this ever changing and rapidly expanding terrain, paying special attention to how computers and the Internet are transforming how we experience and understand identity and community, control and liberation, simulation and authenticity, creation and collaboration, and the practice of politics. Authors whose works we read may include: Jean Baudrillard, Jorge Luis Borges, Yochai Benkler, Nicholar Carr, the Critical Art Ensemble, Galileo, Donna Haraway, Lawrence Lessig, Lewis Mumford, Plato, the RAND Corporation, Sherry Turkle, and Ellen Ullman.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Transfer Student Research Seminar: Myths and Fables in Popular Culture

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Patricia Lennox

Syllabus

FIRST-UG801

Description

Myths, fables, folk tales, and fairy tales are universal. Their heroes, villains, gods and monsters are as old as storytelling and as new as the latest award-winning film. In this class we examine some of these stories and their histories, watching the shifts in emphasis as they are retold and adapted, but also considering why certain mythic figures, such as the vampire, gain greater currency in contemporary tales. Our research focuses on old and new versions of tales, their cultural construction and the critical discourse surrounding them. It serves as the springboard for a series of exercises focused on research methods, several short writing assignments, and a major research paper. Sources include, but are not limited to, selections from works by: J.R.R. Tolkien, Disney, Ovid, Apuleius, Charles Perrault, the Brothers Grimm, Angela Carter, Bruno Bettelheim, Joseph Campbell, Jack Zipes, and Nina Auerbach.

Notes

Open to Gallatin transfer students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Transfer Student Research Seminar (FIRST-UG)

INDIV-UG1901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean's Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student's work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is December 3. To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

SASEM-UG9551 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

TEL AVIV: Food and Identity in the Middle East and its Jewish Communities

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-TEL AVIV. The objective of the course is threefold. First (weeks 1-3), it exposes students to the relationships between food, class and gender and to the extent to which food is part of our symbolic system and mode of thought. This discussion introduces students to the main issues in food studies and provides them with a theoretical ground for the course. Second, (weeks 4-7), we will look at the ways in which food has been used to support the Zionist ideology and the formation of the Jewish nation-state. Lectures focus on the ways in which women have been involuntarily recruited into the process of nation building via food practices. Additionally, I address the various immigrant communities in Israel that, although encouraged to change their food habits, have kept their foodways at the level of the home. We will analyze the ways in which immigrants change their domestic foods and the reasons for the changes. Our discussion will question the social, political and economic circumstances that have pushed immigrants to use food as a means of making a living and the changes their dishes have undergone in aim of appealing to a wide array of consumers. Moreover, in order to understand the relationship between ideology, migration and ethnicity in Israel, we will look at the role food and feeding have played in the formation and protection of the ideology of the traditional kibbutz, as opposed to the new kibbutz. Finally, we shall look at various Israeli open-air food markets and their contribution to the preservation of ethnic hierarchies in Israeli society. We will conclude the second part of the course with a field trip to the “Mahane Yehuda food market” in Jerusalem (week 8) and an in-class short midterm followed by a movie on week nine. The third part of the course (weeks 10-14) looks at social and political processes that have affected Middle Eastern cuisines. Our discussion on food and colonialism will elaborate on issues such as the identity of the Palestinian citizens of Israel and the role food occupies in creating a distinctive national identity. Also we shall look at the modernization of the Middle East and its effect on local diets. We will conclude the course by analyzing the consequences of globalization on local diets and the way in which certain Middle Eastern foods have gone global.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9150 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

BUENOS AIRES: Tango and Mass Culture

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. This course explores Tango as an aesthetic, social and cultural formation that is articulated in interesting and complex ways with the traditions of culture and politics in Argentina and Latin America more generally. During the rapid modernization of the 1920s and 1930s, Tango (like Brazilian Samba), which had been seen as a primitive and exotic dance, began to emerge as a kind of modern primative art form that quickly came to occupy a central space in nationalist discourse. The course explores the way that perceptions of a primative and a modern converge in this unique and exciting art. In addition, the course will consider tango as a global metaphor with deeply embedded connections to urban poverty, social marginalization, and masculine authority.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1674 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Politics of Food

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Myisha Priest

Description

In this class we explore food as an explicitly political space, one that demarcates racial and cultural boundaries and shapes identities. We address these core concerns, in part, by engaging works of literature that examine the relationship between food and the expression of culture, history and trauma. Course texts may include novels like Nervous Conditions, Breath Eyes Memory, Beloved , and Black Boy . Nowhere is food more politically and culturally charged than in NYC, so the city is also our classroom. We negotiate the porous yet enduring boundaries of race and culture as often as we eat, walk or shop in Little Italy or Little India, Koreatown or Chinatown, Le Petite Senegal or Harlem. None of these places or cuisines is in any way associated with contemporary American food culture, which has historically harkened to preserving what is "authentically" American. These differences can be understood as forms of exclusion as well as cultural preservation—but either way they are lines of demarcation that make legible forms of power. We use a variety of texts to investigate dynamics of power represented in and by food. Who is food for? How does the representation of food reify and negotiate the boundaries of race and culture?

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1106 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Knowing Body: Awareness Techniques for Performers

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Robin Powell

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1106

Description

Mind/body awareness techniques increase one's ability to strip away any physical and mental interferences which often appear as stiff, held muscles, poor body habits and impaired concentration. These methods are vital to the creative process and help students to honor inner knowledge. In this workshop, performance is viewed in terms of posture, breath, tension/effort, energy/presence, concentration, body behaviors/habits, and mind/body integration. Students must be prepared to perform a solo piece of their chosing (or an activity to be observed) by the third week of class and work on it throughout the semester. Kinetic Awareness, the Alexander Technique, meditation, visualization, and energy work are learned and applied to student's performance piece. Open to performing arts students who wish to deepen their relationship to their bodies, increase awareness, and draw on inner reserves. Readings include Knaster's Discovering the Body's Wisdom , Steinman's The Knowing Body , Crow's The Alexander Technique as a Basic Approach to Theatrical Training , and Kohnlein's Listening from the Physical Body .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1687 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2013

Cross-Cultural Encounters on the Renaissance Stage

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Valerie Forman

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1687

Description

The Renaissance witnessed both an explosion in theatrical innovation and an increasingly global world--the beginnings of global trade, the “discovery” of the New World, and bouts of both conflict and cooperation among the world’s powers. By reading plays that stage encounters between Europeans from different countries and of different religions, between Europeans and the Ottoman Empire, among natives of “India,” and among Europeans, Native Americans, and African slaves, we explore how and why the stage became such a significant site for the representation of cross-cultural encounters. Some questions we explore include: how do these plays represent conflict—between self and other and over goods and territory—and what possibilities for reconciliation do they imagine? How does the theatre participate in the production of a global consciousness? How do these plays understand the differences encountered as a result of travel, trade, and exploration? Why did the theatre develop a fascination with the exotic (for example, with cannibals and pirates)? In what ways did what it means to be European, Christian, or even a good wife or husband get defined and altered by these encounters? In keeping with the theme of encounters, this course stages a number of creative encounters from the period: between works from different European nations; between plays and the prose works with which they were in dialogue; and between written and visual materials, for example, engravings of the New World and its inhabitants. We also read some newly translated accounts of how Arabs viewed Europe. Likely authors include, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Cervantes, Montaigne, Behn, Fletcher, DeBry, and Massinger.

Notes

Same as MEDI-UA 996 001 and ENGL-UA 800 002.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG723 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Innovation and Sustainability

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Jose Perillan

Syllabus

FIRST-UG723

Description

How was the concept of environmental sustainability born? How did the idea of sustainability transform into the goal of sustainable development? Is innovation helping or hindering achieving the aims of sustainable development? These are some of the questions we address in this course. While working to define sustainability within various contexts, students explore how the complexity of a particular system can complicate the task of sustaining it. Building off of a diverse set of texts, we examine the concept of sustainability from many different perspectives including agriculture, economic development, health care, international law, urban planning, engineering, and religion. Readings may include texts by Henry David Thoreau, Richard Muller, Elinor Ostrom, John Young, Ann Thorpe, Richard Norgaard, Sharachchandra Lélé, David Pearce, Janis Birkeland, and David MacKay. Students write several critical essays throughout the semester culminating in a final research paper.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG9250 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

LONDON: Immigration

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1623 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Green Design and Planning

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Donna Goodman

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1623

Description

As we enter the twenty-first century, architects and planners face a new set of challenges. The world population has tripled in less than a century. Demand for food, water, housing, energy, products, and services has grown at an even faster pace. In response to these issues, architects, designers and planners have created new concepts for green buildings, green cites, alternative infrastructure and products. They have also introduced new laws and environmental standards. This course presents green design and planning concepts through reading, discussion, lectures, films, and projects. Students are asked to write a short paper and create three design projects. The papers examine issues such as energy, transportation, recycling, planning, and design. The projects include design of a recycled product, planning of a roof terrace or small green building, and analysis of an urban park or neighborhood. Students need a camera and drafting tools.

Notes

Section 2 for Environmental Studies majors only.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG9100 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

BERLIN: Berlin's Modern History and Culture: A European Perspective

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BERLIN. Germany’s profound influence on Modern European history and culture is felt nowhere as visibly as in Berlin. This interdisciplinary course analyzes the city’s contributions to culture––in literature, memoir, music, film and painting––and its politics in the wider context of European trends. The course provides a comprehensive survey of Modern Berlin history and examines how artists reflected on those changing times. Special topics include: Christopher Isherwood’s fictionalized memoirs during the Weimar Years, the Nazi Aesthetic during the Berlin 1936 Olympics as constructed by filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl, the photo-realist reflections of painter Gerhard Richter on terrorism in Berlin in the 1970s, and Germany’s literary reassessment of guilt and victimhood following reunification. Readings and lectures are supplemented with walking tours of Berlin and its museums, to look at traces of historical, social and cultural change in situ; how memory, history and place interact over time in specific locations.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

CLI-UG1422 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Cultural Mapping for Social Change

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Jaime Martinez

Description

Where do forces of gentrification intersect with grassroots efforts to preserve the cultural identity of a marginalized community? How are demographics used as a tool by political activists to organize campaigns? How is mapping being used in campaigns to affect social change? This course explores how to use Geographic Information Systems (GIS), a powerful application in mapping technology, as a tool for cultural documentation, community engagement, and public policy analysis. We explore the effectiveness of GIS as a mapping tool to help understand historical patterns of demographics, and empower community members to become informed citizens in the decision-making process. Specific skills we'll learn include how to geocode addresses, do a spatial analysis, and use census data to map the racial and income composition of New York neighborhoods. You also work with local community based organizations to understand how community non-profits are using GIS mapping as a tool for research and strategic planning.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

IDSEM-UG1289 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Narrative Investigations II: Realism to Postmodernism

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Stacy Pies

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1289

Description

In this class we continue to explore the concept of narrative and the way writers interrogate literary and social conventions. As we consider how stories shape our notions of history, gender, class, and sexual identity, we examine how the thinking of readers, and stories, changed from the nineteenth century to the twentieth. Tracing the evolution of literary narrative from realism, to modernism and postmodernism, we see a new form of narration emerge, where protagonists include not only characters, but also time, place, the city, the reader, and language itself. Our readings include Stendhal’s The Red and the Black , Joyce’s Ulysses , and Jeanette Winterson’s Written on the Body , as well as writing on film by Seymour Chatman and films such as Memento .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9250 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

LONDON: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. This 4-credit course includes a weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork per week at an approved internship fieldsite. Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

SASEM-UG9201 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

FLORENCE: Topics in 19th Century Literature: Italy and Italians in English Literature from the Romantics to Modernism

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. Romantic, Victorian, and Modernist writers in both Britain and the United States were fascinated by Italy. The "Italy and Italians" of the title refers not only to images and characters in the works of the British and American authors we will be reading but also to their affinities with Italian literature. Recurring themes in the course will be history and its uses in literature, gender and sexuality, democracy and aristocracy, language and power, and religion as an instrument of sexual repression.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1207 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Post-Modern Dance: Contemporary Experimental Choreography

4 units Wed
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Leslie Satin

Description

In this workshop, we depart from traditional dance composition courses by focusing on the concepts, strategies, and actions that occupy contemporary experimental—“downtown,” if you will—choreographers. We’ll spend most of our time in the studio, moving through physical warm-ups structured to prepare ourselves for developing dance material informed by live performances, videos, guest appearances, and readings by and about dance-makers, from the first post-modernists of the 1960s through those continuing their lineage and those exploring completely different paths. We’ll consider dance as a factor in interarts performance, work grounded in the intersection of dance and technology, site-specific choreography, and improvisation as an autonomous movement practice and as a way to generate movement for choreography. We’ll borrow, of course, from what students bring to the workshop: their individual dance histories as well as their interests and desires. Readings may include essays by Steve Paxton, Yvonne Rainer, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Simone Forti, Ramsey Burt, Allan Kaprow, Susan Leigh Foster, and Nancy Stark Smith.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

SASEM-UG9404 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

PRAGUE: Literature and Place of Central Europe

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. You are now in the center of Europe, where West melds with East, creating a melting-pot. What does central Europe mean in terms of literature? Which authors reveled in their location, thus inspiring others, and which longed to be free from this by-and-large geographically land-locked mass? Discover the prose and poetry of this space that has belonged to others for centuries and that now belongs to you as well. The literature will also be supplemented with various Central European photographs and culinary investigations!

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1316 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Playing Jazz

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bill Rayner

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1316

Description

This workshop is designed for student musicians with the knowledge and skills of basic musicianship who want to learn to play jazz or extend their present ability to play jazz. Students learn the fundamentals of improvisation: scale and chord structures, modes, chord progressions, rhythmic applications, song forms and options for organizing an improvisation such as creating a melody out of melodic fragments, scale fragments, and sequences. We listen to great jazz performers to hear examples of good improvisation, proper phrasing and jazz styles. Students attending the workshop gain a working musical vocabulary in the language of mainstream jazz. This workshop offers students a solid starting point, whether they want to play professionally, for personal enjoyment or simply to broaden their knowledge of what it takes to play jazz.

Notes

Lab fee: $35. Course meets at Drummer's Collective, 123 West 18th Street.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

WRTNG-UG1560 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Art and Craft of Poetry

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Scott Hightower

Syllabus

WRTNG-UG1560

Description

In this workshop poets focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer's process and on Poetry as a two-headed tradition, having an Oral Tradition and a Written Tradition. A brief review covers some of poetry's history including metric and syllabic measures of writing from the Anglo-Saxon to modern free verse. A weekly reading of a poem by each poet in the circle serves as point of departure for discussions of the relationships of craft and expression.

Notes

Students may take The Art and Craft of Poetry two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1703 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Green Dream

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Meredith Theeman

Description

The modern notion of "greenness" equates the natural environment with goodness. What do we make of this equation? This seminar takes an interdisciplinary approach to analyzing the way that people have conceptualized their relationship with nature and the natural, and how these views impact our behavior. We employ psychological theory and empirical research to explore how people form their values with regard to the environment. Possible texts include Hippocrates, Yi-Fu Tuan, E.O. Wilson, William Cronon, Ernest Callenbach, Rachel Carson, Alan Weisman, Michael Pollan and Ruth Ozeki.

Notes

Section 3 for Environmental Studies majors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1115 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Creative Arts in the Helping Professions

4 units Thu
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Maria Hodermarska

Description

This workshop explores the uses of drama, dance, visual arts, music and poetry within the health care professions, serving children to geriatric populations. Against a theoretical background of the psychological needs of mentally and physically ill individuals, the creative processes of the arts are experienced as they can humanize, sensitize, ameliorate, and liberate expressive capacities. Activities drawn from each art form are tried out, sometimes blended, and adapted for diverse age groups and needs. The workshop provides substantial background for artists, artist-educators, leisure studies majors, as well as others interested in exploring an ancillary or major career in the arts therapies. Employment possibilities are discussed, as well as professional organizations and registry requirements for further in-depth training. The workshop also includes selected books and visits by working arts therapists.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1633 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Ecological Transport, Infrastructure and Building Design

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Mitchell Joachim

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1633

Description

The current environmental decline is a multifaceted predicament for our civilization. Previously, utopian projects have failed to reverse this ecological decay. This crisis demands robust solutions on a massive scale to deal with an immanent mega-urbanity. We attempt to re-envision vehicles, infrastructure, and buildings to meet the ecological needs of the future. Students consider questions such as: what is wrong with city systems today and what are the key environmental forces that shape them? Each student individually critiques and evaluates multiple engineered urban entities and subsequently prescribe new innovations. The objective is to establish the most scientifically plausible designs for a new socio-ecological world. Readings, historical figures, and works for the course include Janine M. Benyus, Ian McHarg, Richard T.T. Forman, John Todd, Anne Spirn, Geoffery Jellicoe, Jane Jacobs, Annie Leonard, Buckminster Fuller, William J. Mitchell, Mohsen Mostafavi, Ken Yeang, and others.

Notes

Same as ENVST-UA 450.005.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1614 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Architecture and Urban Design Lab I

6 units Tue
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Louise Harpman

Description

This advanced architectural design LAB engages students in the research and design processes most often found in architecture and urban design studio classes. The LAB takes as its baseline that design is a socio-political-ecological practice that is applicable to all scales of human endeavor, including the design of materials, vehicles, buildings, and infrastructure systems. The LAB looks broadly at contemporary challenges, including resource management, human and non-human habitation, as well as political and social pressures on the environment. As a project-based course, students work individually and in teams and combine original research to create relevant and compelling design proposals. Introductory design exercises prepare students for an intense focus on a current problem in an established or emerging urban environment. Students are expected to present their ideas through the use of diagrams, scale models, video, animations, and other forms of imaging. Thus, as they create and develop original design proposals, students experiment with a variety of techniques and forms of representation. Research skills and visual literacy will be prioritized. Authors may include Stephen Johnson, William McDonough, Hilary Ballon, Richard Sennett, Geoff Manaugh, Witold Rybczinksi, Ricky Burdett, Eric Klinenberg, Keller Easterling, Peter Hall, Keith Critchlow, Ernst Haeckl, James Corner, Victor Papanek, Kate Orff and others. Proficiency in the AdobeSuite CS5 is required as is the permission of the instructor.

Notes

Suggested Prerequisites: ARTS-UG 1619 or ARTS-UG 1621 or ARTS-UG 1603 or ARTS-UG 1626 or ARTS-UG 1623 or ARTS-UG 1617 or ARTS-UG 1627 or the equivalent.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1590 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Walter Benjamin: Theory for Gleaners

4 units Wed
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
A.B. Huber

Description

Long before the current vogue for eco-living, recycling, and repurposing, there have been people surviving with little fanfare on leftovers and discards, and theorists meditating on the revolutionary possibilities of refuse and junk. This seminar introduces students to the work of Walter Benjamin, who is both a central figure in critical theory and an early, powerful commentator on the politics and aesthetics of the cast-off. We begin the course with Agnès Varda’s film The Gleaners and I , and we continue to explore the relation between theory and the collecting and recycling of ideas, images, and objects, especially those that have been overlooked or abandoned. What, if anything, do ragpickers or dumpster divers have to teach us about subjects as large as theory, history, modernity, and the city? Our primary text is Benjamin's expansive and unfinished work of citations and brief commentaries, The Arcades Project (1927-1940), but we consider the work of other 19th and 20th century collectors and archivists. We read widely from Freud, Marx, and the Frankfurt School, with additional materials ranging from the photographs of Eugène Atget to the films of Chris Marker. What did Benjamin and the moderns make of dross, and what can we glean from their thought for our own times?

Notes

Same as COLIT-UA 800 002.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1737 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Science and Culture

2 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Myles Jackson

Description

This course examines various examples of how the conduct and context of science are framed by culture, and conversely, how science shapes culture. Which models proffered by various historians, philosophers, cultural anthropologists, and sociologists can begin to explain this relationship? The first portion of this course addresses how scientific knowledge was intricately intertwined with religious and political knowledge during the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment. The next section illustrates how important developments in thermodynamics (or the physics of work and waste) led to improvements in nineteenth-century musical instrument design and a change in musical aesthetics. Similarly, we shall discuss how twentieth-century technological and scientific developments in fin-de-siècle Europe and the U.S. directly led to new artistic expressions and aesthetics. The final third of the course looks at how the content of scientific and technological knowledge associated with “Big Science” from World War II to the present owes much to the development of national defense in the case of physics and to venture-corporate capitalism in the case of molecular biology. Rather than simply stay at the level of case studies, we shall continually test the various models, which attempt to explain the complex and historically contingent relationship between science and culture Finally, the course will force students to think about related issues, such as the history of objectivity and the differences and similarities between science on the one hand, and the social sciences and humanities on the other. Readings include: Newton, Jackson, Kursell, Riskin, Brain, Kevles, and Weinberg. This interdisciplinary seminar may be used to fulfill the science requirement.

Notes

Prerequisite IDSEM-UG 1519 or permission of the instructor. Course meets 1/29- 3/14 only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ELEC-GG2755 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Contemporary Everyday Life in Iran

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Ali Mirsepassi

Syllabus

ELEC-GG2755

Description

This course will explore social and cultural theories and practices of everyday life. We will study various theoretical approaches to the understanding of everyday realities and focus on Iran as a contemporary case study. Theories of everyday life focus on the elusive character of our reality called "everydayness," the commonplace, ordinary, familiar and generally taken-for-granted world. What are the social and cultural elements that constitute life as ordinary reality? Study of everyday life is a highly powerful representation of how physical public space can be infused with the full richness and ambiguity of the imaginary—in a material context where the future path of a society is being decided through people’s ‘innocuous’ everyday actions (gathering to drink tea or coffee, playing music, or going shopping). A ‘lifestyle’ expresses a political allegiance, however murkily and grainily understood. It is ‘below’ the level of rational discourse, in imaginatively infused habitus. We will particularly focus on the variety of everyday practices in post-revolutionary Iran under the Islamic Republic. The class starts with a brief section on the social and cultural history of modern Iran and studies important scholarly works on the Iranian Revolution of 1979. We will also examine the social and cultural changes taking place in Iran over the past three decades. Most of the course will focus on various forms of everyday life practices in Iran. Some areas of everyday life we will examine are: consumption and life style; youth and underground culture; love and sexual experiences; public and private sphere; new and old religiosity; leisure time and secularization of time; and war as an ideological practice.

Notes

Same as NEST-GA 2785. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (am128@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

WRTNG-UG1536 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Short Story: A Workshop on Revising

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Carol Zoref

Syllabus

WRTNG-UG1536

Description

This workshop is dedicated to the oft-repeated observation that all writing is re-writing. Each writer focuses their efforts on only one or two short stories, rather than starting many new stories and abandoning them in favor of yet another new beginning. Students take each of their stories through a number of drafts and revise them in response to (though not necessarily in accord with) questions and comments raised by other members of the workshop. The objective is to learn ways of staying with such challenges as maintaining the story's voice, determining the order of experience, and arriving at an ending that satisfies the design of the story as well as the intentions of the writer. Workshop members share their stories in class throughout the semester and comment in detail on one another's work. Participants should have some experience writing short stories.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

ELEC-GG2730 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Causes Beyond Borders: Human Rights Activism and Global Governance

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Vasuki Nesiah

Syllabus

ELEC-GG2730

Description

One of the most distinctive dimensions of contemporary globalization has been the flourishing of transnational activism. Causes, organizations and activist networks have crossed borders alongside capital, goods and labor to reshape the terrain of political engagement. This class examines the enabling conditions and (intended and unintended) consequences of this turn to transnational activism in relation to other dimensions of contemporary global governance. The course will focus on human rights initiatives, including international non-governmental organizations such as Amnesty International and transnational campaigns such as ‘Save Darfur’. Reading important critical interventions of the last decade, the class will collectively analyze how different approaches mobilize and challenge different actors, causes and alternative imaginings of 'the global'. The course is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Readings are likely to draw from Sydney Tarrow, Clifford Bob, Daniel Bell, Kathryin Sikkink, Sally Merry, Stephen Hopgood, Mahmoud Mamdani, Kamari Clark, Wendy Hesford and Valerie Sperling.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (vn10@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ARTS-UG1656 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Ideas in Action: Advanced Projects in Arts Publications

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Lise Friedman

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1656

Description

What happens between the first inkling of an idea and its final outcome in published form? And how does what happens along the way affect the look and tone of the finished work? No matter the medium—it might be a CD cover, design for a matchbook, poster, theater program, artist’s book, shopping bag, or a continuously evolving new media platform—every sort of publication goes through a number of essential steps, each building and expanding upon the last until the desired results are achieved. Students in this advanced arts workshop explore and apply critical thinking to each of these steps through a combination of short-term and in-depth, semester-long projects (one of which is to create a visual journal), guest lecturers, directed readings, and field trips, and in the process discover some of the many ways in which concepts might be investigated, clarified, and ultimately realized. Readings may include Sagmeister: Made You Look, Looking Closer 5, and Stop, Think, Go, Do: How Typography and Graphic Design Influence Behavior.

Notes

Prerequisite ARTS-UG 1655 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

WRTNG-UG1546 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Content is Key: Editing Short Fiction

4 units Tue
7:45 PM - 10:15 PM
Steven Rinehart

Syllabus

WRTNG-UG1546

Description

This class explores the hard decision-making involved in fiction, and attempts to give the students tools for deciding which content belongs in a story and which needs to be put aside for later use, or discarded altogether. We look at ways to discover what the first and second drafts are about, and which parts of the story add to that idea and which detract. We also hold a traditional workshop, discussing student stories in a roundtable session.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

WRTNG-UG1042 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Pop Culture Criticism

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Amanda Petrusich

Syllabus

WRTNG-UG1042

Description

In an era where criticism has been democratized and art is often judged exclusively by the amount of chatter it incites, the role of the professional critic is changing (and fast – these days, even reviews are subject to reviews). In this advanced writing workshop, we’ll explore the best, most effective ways for writers to engage critically with pop culture. Should critical writing be personal or objective? Is it more important to contextualize or describe? Given the overwhelming deluge of options facing media consumers, is the critic’s job merely to direct the conversation? Students submit five original pieces of criticism for workshop; readings may include works by Pauline Kael, Nancy Franklin, Nitsuh Abebe, A.O. Scott, Sasha Frere-Jones and others.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

CLI-UG1464 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Shifting Focus II: Video Production and Community Activism

4 units Mon
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Mark Read

Syllabus

CLI-UG1464

Description

In Shifting Focus II, students focus on the concrete tasks associated with video production and distribution, while at the same time investigating recent theoretical work relating to the impact of social networks on political organizing and how web 2.0 technologies alter the dynamics of video distribution. New tools and an ever changing technological environment call for a radical re-thinking of how video is, and can be, used within the context of community organizing, and yet the basic rules for how to make powerful, influential work remain mostly the same. In this course students hone their craft as young media makers, while at the same time become web 2.0 strategists on how to deploy the media they make.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

IDSEM-UG1294 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Philosophy of Medicine

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bradley Lewis

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1294

Description

Most medical inquiry focuses on narrow issues of disease from within a biomedical framework. It rarely steps back from the particulars to ask larger philosophic questions regarding the goals of medicine and healthcare. In this class we take the opposite strategy to focus on the larger theoretical and philosophical issues in U.S. healthcare. We unpack the underlying concepts and principles that organize contemporary medical research, practice, and education. We look at the strengths and weaknesses of today’s dominant models of medicine and we consider the possibilities of alternative conceptual frames. Plus, we consider how much of the administrative and financial problems of today’s healthcare crisis can be explained by conceptual and philosophical issues. Our inquiry will be an interdisciplinary approach that draws from medicine, philosophy, history, anthropology, sociology, gender studies, disability studies, cultural studies, poetry, drama, and documentary.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

PRACT-UG1301 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Practicum in Fashion Business

4 units Tue
3:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Tracy Gardner, Patricia Lennox

Syllabus

PRACT-UG1301

Description

The fashion industry’s need to balance the conflicting demands of specialization and globalization requires innovative approaches that connect creativity, design and business. This course considers the dialogue surrounding ways the fashion business can meet these demands by linking aesthetic goals to financial plans. The course is designed to provide students interested in the fashion industry with an opportunity to develop their understanding of various approaches to bridging the gap between design and business. The course combines hands-on group projects and case studies with interdisciplinary readings in business and design history, consumerism, merchandizing and the business of fashion. The course is taught by the Guess Distinguished Visiting Professor in Fashion and Fashion Business, and by Patricia Lennox, a member of the Gallatin faculty.

Notes

Permission required. Application deadline: Friday, October 26. Applications available at 1 Washington Place, 8th floor reception.

Type

Practicum (PRACT-UG)

IDSEM-UG9351 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

PARIS: Cultures & Contexts: Multiculturalism in France

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PARIS. France and the U.S. have a habit of looking at one another as anti-models when it comes to discussions of assimilation and difference, “race,” identity, community and diversity. In this course, we explore this comparison as a productive means for re-considering these terms. Why is the notion of “ethnic community” so problematic in France? And why do Americans insist on the “homogeneity” of the French nation, even as, at various points throughout modern French history, France has received more immigrants to its shores than the United States? Through readings, film screenings, and site visits we explore the movements and encounters that have made Paris a rich, and sometimes controversial, site of cultural exchange. Topics include contemporary polemics on questions such as headscarves, the banlieue, the new Paris museums of immigration and “primitive” art, affirmative action and discrimination positive, historic expressions of exoticism, négritude, and anti-colonialism. Occasional case studies drawn from the American context help provide a comparative framework for these ideas. Conducted in English.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1547 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Writing the Novel

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Lara Vapnyar

Description

The main objectives of this course are to provide students interested in writing a novel an awareness of the various techniques available to them and to help them develop their own approach to novel writing. We examine every aspect of the craft of novel writing: plot, structure, point of view, narrative voice, dialogue, building of individual scenes, etc. Students learn to study texts from the unique perspective of a writer. The class becomes a community of writers working in a safe, honest and considerate environment, presenting their own fiction, responding to the writing of others, and discussing questions about literature, editing, and publishing. Each student writes a novel outline and two chapters. Reading assignments include works by a variety of classic and contemporary authors, such as Jane Austen, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Junot Diaz, and Jennifer Egan.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

CORE-GG2015 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Proseminar: Community Studies and Action

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 8:20 PM
David Moore

Syllabus

CORE-GG2015

Description

This proseminar is designed for students interested broadly in social theory and practice, or more narrowly in community studies and/or community-based action, whether in the social services, education, the media, urban planning, grassroots organizing or political movements. It introduces them to interdisciplinary inquiry and action by using ‘community’ as an example of a complex idea in the social domain: exploring its varied meanings and manifestations from the perspectives of different kinds of theorists—sociologists, psychologists, anthropologists and historians, for example—and examining the ways different kinds of activists and professionals attempt to shape it. Readings, discussions and projects will engage students in understanding some of the dominant paradigms in social thought and approaches to social action. They will also be encouraged to apply these modes of inquiry and practice to their own goals and plans for the graduate program.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1729 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2013

Ancient and Renaissance Festivity: Its Literary, Dramatic and Social Forms

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Susanne Wofford

Description

This class investigates the role of festive custom and holiday release, and the kinds of performance and literary form that they enable or frustrate, in ancient Greece and Rome, and in Renaissance Europe, with a 20th century Caribbean postlude. Why does festivity sometimes lead to political revolt and at other times does not? Why does the "carnivalesque" often include festive abuse as well as celebration? We look at theories of festivity and release, at the dionysiac, at the human/animal union in festivity, and at the role of the classical period in shaping Renaissance and even modern ideas of festivity, irony and the festive worship of the gods. We also explore the effect of the Protestant suppression of festive holiday and theatricality in Shakespeare’s England, and at the tensions inherent in festivity between excess and moderation, between the saturnalia and the philosophical symposium. The class begins with classical festivity, with Plato's “Symposium,” Euripides' The Bacchae , selections from Ovid's Fasti and the Metamorphoses , and Apuleius' Golden Ass . Readings from the Renaissance include: Rabelais, Gargantua and Pantagruel ; Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream , 1 Henry IV; Twelfth Night, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter’s Tale. Concluding with carnival practices in the circum-Atlantic world, we take as examples the film Black Orpheus ( Orfeu Negro , directed by Marcel Camus), New Orleans carnival and Jazz Funerals, and Paule Marshall’s novel The Chosen Place, the Timeless People (1969) in order to see how these older traditions shape modern experience.

Notes

Open to sophomores and juniors only. Same as ENGL-UA 252 002 and MEDI-UA 996 002.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1577 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

The Ethnographic Imagination

4 units Thu
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Ritty Lukose

Description

Ethnography has been narrowly construed as the research methodology that defines the discipline of cultural anthropology, but this course explores ethnography as both a mode of inquiry and a genre of writing through we grapple with the experience of Self and Other at the intersection of overlapping cultural worlds. We begin by linking modern ethnographic writing to early travel narratives, to missionary accounts, and to colonial reports serving evolving imperial formations.We then examine the consolidation of an "ethnographic" perspective in the emerging discipline of anthropology, as well as more recent critiques of this genre. Our own method is reading classic and contemporary ethnographic works. These reveal ongoing tensions between the scientific and the literary; between abstract "theory" and ethnographic "practice;" and between the claim to truth-telling and the power and limits linked to the positioning of the author. In response to these tensions we also trace the textual experimentation that mixes ethnography, poetry, memoir, and travel writing, fiction, and film. Our goal is to develop a self-reflective ethnographic imagination, open to the possibilities and difficulties in cross-cultural understanding, as we consider the complexities in encounter and contact, looking and describing, representing and translating. Possible texts include travel writings from the period of early European expansion, Conquest of America by Todorov, Argonauts of the Western Pacific by Malinowski, Coming of Age in Samoa by Margaret Mead; Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography by Clifford and Marcus, Vita: Life in a Zone of Social Abandonment by J. Biehl, In an Antique Land by Amitav Ghosh, and the films of Trin Minh Ha.

Notes

Open to sophomores only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1360 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Intellectuals and Power: Reading Through Foucault, Lenin, and Gramsci

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
René Francisco Poitevin

Description

This course uses Lenin, Gramsci, and Foucault to pursue two questions: first, how does power operate in society? Second, what is the role of intellectuals in relation to power and politics? On the one hand, we ask: what is power? (Is it located in the state? corporations? media? in discourse? In what ways is power a problem and in what ways a resource?) On the other hand, we ask: what is “the intellectual?” What sort of social category and institution is thereby denoted? What do intellectuals claim to know and what is the political impact of their authority? Our goal is to explore how intellectuals give us a language to “see” power, but also how they have been implicated in the very forms of power they teach us to analyze. Readings include texts by Lenin, Gramsci, and Foucault, among others.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1486 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

Revolucion

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Alejandro Velasco

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1486

Description

Equating Latin America and revolution seems almost a truism. From Zapata to "Ché" to Chávez, the region's modern history is a tale of one movement promising epic change to the next, each more dramatic than the last and collectively giving rise to an image of Latin America as a cradle of firebrand leaders and riotous masses leaving in their wake endless cycles of unrest. But to look deeper into this history is to find a world of complexity, of peoples pursuing radical change but also gradual reform, at times taking up ballots and at times taking up arms, at times in the factory and at times on the farm, at times from the left and at times from the right. All of it "revolución," yes, but what kind? And through what means? And for what ends? And at what cost? This course traces the evolution of revolution in twentieth century Latin America, from the final collapse of Spanish colonialism in 1898 to the rise of chavismo in 1998, and finally considers the impact of this history on Latin America today. Authors may include, among others, Mariano Azuela, Eva Perón, Gustavo Gutierrez, Subcomandante Marcos, and Raul Zibechi.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9150 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

BUENOS AIRES: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. This course is designed as a small seminar and combines weekly section meetings, together with internships in organizations in Argentina. The academic part is meant to assist students in getting the most from their internship experience and provide theoretical and methodological elements to critically examine these experiences. It weaves together research design and methods with an empirical and theoretical examination of recent social phenomena in Argentina. The goal is to acquire an in-depth understanding of the organization in which students will conduct internships, as well as reflect on the experience. We will use selected themes and topics to explore theoretical perspectives and aspects of contemporary Argentine society. In parallel we will explore how to construct a research project, collect data and analyze its contents. In the first weeks we will work together to develop research topics, shape projects, discuss techniques for conducting fieldwork research. The second part will focus on the student’s individual work experience and research projects.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

ARTS-UG1612 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Video Production: First Person, Present Tense

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Keith Miller

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1612

Description

This arts workshop focuses on video production at the intersection of narrative fiction and documentary, memoir, and experimental film. The class challenges the students to mine their own surroundings and experiences to find stories that move and challenge them or those around them and then create a visual document that expresses the issues of personal interest within it. Once the theme has been chosen the following challenge will be to find the most appropriate end for the work: internet, film festival, art gallery, iPhone or public space, for example. As part of the class, instruction is given on editing software and basic issues with sound and the camera. The participants are also challenged to work with the people, budgets and means at their immediate disposal: camera phone, web cam, surveillance tape, etc.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG741 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Home and Homeland

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Kathryn Vomero Santos

Description

What is home? Where is home? How do we define home? What does it mean to be home? In this course, we explore the concepts of home and homeland as they relate to geographical place, birth, language, and cultural identity. We read texts by and about exiles, émigrés, and expatriates in order to think about the departure from home, the loss of home, and the processes by which people make new homes and maintain relationships to their native lands. Does the ability or inability to return home affect one’s perceptions of home? Is the idea of home an imagined fantasy or is it grounded in concrete places and experiences? We also examine past and contemporary practices of defining homes and homelands in relation to outsiders. How, in other words, are ideas of home and homeland exclusionary? Students write various analytic essays that address these questions and develop individual projects for a longer research essay. The texts for this course may include the writings of Edward Said, Salman Rushdie, and Eva Hoffman, articles about immigration policy and Homeland Security, the PBS documentary Homeland: Immigration in America , and clips from the recent television show Homeland .

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1181 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

A Sense of Place

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Steve Hutkins

Description

This course examines the places in which we work and play, travel and dwell - the office tower and the suburban house, the city street and the superhighway, the small town and the megalopolis, the shopping mall and the theme park, the American road and foreign places. Synthesizing insights from literary works and fields like cultural geography, landscape studies, and architectural history, we explore such questions as: What gives a place its particular feel or character? How do our values and worldview affect the way we experience places, and what constitutes that experience? How do places---and the way they are represented in literature and other media---shape our attitudes and behavior? What gives a place "quality," and how can we design and build better places? Readings may include J. B. Jackson’s Landscape in Sight , Yi-Fu Tuan’s Space and Place , James Kunstler’s The Geography of Nowhere , D. J. Waldie’s Holy Land , Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities , and Michael Sorkin’s Twenty Minutes in Manhattan .

Notes

Section 3 for Environmental Studies majors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9550 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

TEL AVIV: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-TEL AVIV. The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Israel's Civil Society. Israel is a country where the government and the establishment at large have historically been very central in determining the country's political direction as well as its social fabric and political culture. It is therefore of special interest to study the emergence of new players in Israel, especially the role of the Third Sector, or Civil Society and within it the even newer phenomenon of Social Change Organizations and their effect on Israeli political and social life over the past three decades. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency, its approach, its policies, its programs, and the context in which it operates. You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1692 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Transformation of Music in a Century of Electronica

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Herbert Deutsch

Description

This course examines the effect of electronics on the inventions and the artistic and social activities that shaped musical thought throughout the twentieth century and into today. From the initial “magic” of capturing sound through recording - until the invention and development of electrical and electronic musical instruments, these changes in art and music during the century of electronica were unique and often mind-blowing. The interaction of impressionism, “modernism”, abstract art and dadaism on musical compositions during their times are explored as are the profound effect of both analog and digital devices on creativity and performance. The primary text is Electronic and Experimental Music by Thom Holmes, and recommended readings include Analog Days , by Pinch and Trocco; Theremin , by Albert Glinsky; and Electroacoustic Music , by Herbert Deutsch.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1406 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Drawing in the Expanded Field

4 units Wed
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Nina Katchadourian

Description

Drawing has long been considered a foundational element in the study of art. In the 20th century, drawing has also become a medium that exists front and center in the practice of many contemporary artists. While previously it was understood as a preparatory tool, now it is seen as a final destination. The very question of what constitutes drawing has been redefined by artists who have pushed the bounds of the term. This course consider activities in our everyday life that touch on aspects of drawing (writing, diagrammatic language, notation, mapping). We also think about the ways drawing has been taught traditionally, and to consider what associations the medium carries today from this history. The question of what constitutes drawing is approached through process and concept much more than as defined by medium, and the course focuses on an expanded, experimental approach to drawing. Assignments are often a response to a wide variety of artistic mediums where there exist resonant relationships (dance, installation, land art, architecture, sculpture, and performance, among others). Students work in conventional drawing media (pencil, paper, eraser, ink) but also explore how other media can expand the idea of what "drawing" might mean. Although this is a studio course, there is a rigorous reading/research component as well. Texts are assigned for discussion regularly and students do individual presentations to the class based on focused research topics.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG709 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Language and the Political

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Andrew Libby

Syllabus

FIRST-UG709

Description

How does language affect how we think about political possibilities? How have writers and activists sought to change society through changing how we use language? How is rhetoric used politically, in essays, law, oratory, propaganda, and poetry? We read arguments about the interplay of language and the political, think about political theory, examine political rhetoric, and study literary works. We write about the power of rhetoric to form and criticize political practices: movements for civil rights, human rights, rights for women, workers’ rights, and animal rights. We investigate in detail how language participates in our ideas about rights, ethics, political action, and social justice. After familiarizing ourselves with various approaches to thinking political and social relations, you can then explore in depth an issue of social justice that animates you. This means that we use the reading to focus your critical thinking capacities, expand your horizons, and communicate the results of these processes in writing that is persuasive, coherent, exhilarating, meaningful. Readings may include works by Plato, Alice Walker, Thomas Jefferson, Karl Marx, Margaret Fuller, Henry David Thoreau, Mohandas Mahatma Gandhi, Hannah Arendt, Judith Butler, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Malcolm X, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Ursula LeGuin.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1313 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Ethics for Dissenters

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bill Caspary

Description

This course is about dissent in a double sense: criticizing accepted ethical values, and criticizing old ways of philosophical thought about ethics. It is about affirmative ethics, not just criticism. Over the years the course has grown into a survey of classic writings in ethical philosophy from Socrates to Sartre. One third of the class is devoted to the classical Greek thought of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics. There is a brief critical look at Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. The modern period covers the ethics of Romanticism, Marxism, Pragmatism, Existentialism, and Feminism—as dissenting alternatives to mainstream Kantian and utilitarian ethics. Authors include Dewey, Emerson, Hegel, Gilligan, James, Marx, Nietzsche, Sartre, and Schiller. From these texts perspectives emerge on: (1) criticizing unjust (e.g. sexist) ethical standards, and inventing fair ones; (2) choosing ethical careers and life paths; (3) recognizing responsibilities to the larger community; (4) resolving ethical dilemmas; (5) forming and justifying visions of a better world; (6) dialoguing productively with adversaries by respecting different ethical positions without the cop-out of "anything goes;" (8) and getting beyond dead-end debate on idealism/realism, egotism/altruism, objectivism/relativism.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1573 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Writing for the Screen II

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Selma Thompson

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1573

Description

Writing for the Screen II provides a structured workshop environment in which students who have already completed a first draft of a feature-length screenplay can assess their work and take their writing to the next level by completing a second draft and a polish. Can the script be edited to improve pace and structure? Can the story be made more active and visual? Can more be done with character choices and setting? Are there ideas, themes, and/or jokes to further explore? Are there issues of story logic or continuity yet to be worked out? Is the story presented professionally, creatively using screenplay format to engage the reader? What elements make the script commercially viable and how might it be pitched? Writing a second draft is a creative adventure, a chance to see how far you can take your initial idea as your story grows richer and your characters start to come alive on the page. Texts include Russin and Downs, Writing the Picture ; Mamet, Bambi vs. Godzilla: The Nature, Purpose, and Practice of the Movie Business ; Goldman, Adventures in the Screen Trade ; Lowenstein, My First Movie: 20 Celebrated Directors Talk about Their First Film ; and the screenplays for Chinatown and Ordinary People .

Notes

Prerequisite ARTS-UG 1570 or DWPG-UT 35 or permission of instructor.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1695 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
SP 2013

Competing Images of the Sage: Confucius and Lao Tzu

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Ethan Harkness

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1695

Description

Among the early Chinese philosophers whose ideas have framed moral, social and political discourse in East Asia, the figures of Confucius and Lao Tzu stand out, not only as thinkers of towering influence, but also as diametrically opposed archetypes of wisdom. In this seminar, we begin by reading the works attributed to each man, and then we proceed to examine the ways in which their legacies have been and continue to be appropriated by others. Toward this end we explore competing manifestations of Confucius and Lao Tzu in Chinese religion, in popular culture, and in the marketplace of ideas. Themes include the opposing impulses of idolization and iconoclasm, censorship and propaganda, and the sacralization and commercialization of traditional values. Apart from Confucius’ Analects and Lao Tzu’s Tao Te Ching , assignments may include Lao-tzu and the Tao-te-ching edited by Livia Kohn and Michael LaFargue, selections from Early Daoist Scriptures by Stephen R. Bokenkamp, Confucius from the Heart: Ancient Wisdom for Today's World by Yu Dan, and the controversial 2010 Hong Kong film Confucius starring Yun-fat Chow.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9050 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

ACCRA: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-ACCRA. Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Contact global.academics@nyu.edu for application information. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

WRTNG-UG1303 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Writing Nonfiction on Social Change

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Nancy Agabian

Syllabus

WRTNG-UG1303

Description

In this course, we’ll examine nonfiction from times of conflict and crisis to help us write essays and critiques in which we witness, report, advocate, question, and/or desire change in our own era. To provide inspiration, we’ll read essays on 9/11 and its aftermath, the Arab Spring, Occupy Wall Street, and other issues. We read works by authors such as John D’Agata, Edwidge Danticat, Arundhati Roy, Carolyn Forche, Ryszard Kapuscinski, and Lawrence Weschler, to study their use of formal tools such as narration, observation, analysis, reflection, and argument in exploring avenues of change in the world around them. How do writers bring a personal voice to writing a political essay? And how do reporters balance opinion and research to show the need for change? These questions are considered as you write 1) an essay centered on an issue that you care about, and 2) a report that you write from observation about a social or political movement. Finally, writing an argument or advocacy piece on a public debate allows you to incorporate all the lessons from the semester. Revision is part of our process, guided by peer reviews.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1631 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

The U.S. Empire and the Americas

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Marie Cruz Soto

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1631

Description

The workings and even existence of a U.S. Empire has long been cause of controversy. The debate often revolves around whether the United States is guided by imperial self-interest, or by the pursuit of freedom. Because debates about U.S. imperialism since 9/11 have centered on interventions in seemingly distant places like Iraq and Afghanistan, Empire appears to denote a far-from-home phenomenon. Yet, the U.S. Empire is born out of and continues to depend upon (post)colonial interactions in the Americas. This course, therefore, explores the premise that the U.S. Empire is an American Empire continuously redefined closer-to-home through contested borders, migrations, local politics and cultural practices, and inseparable from hemispheric experimentations with the meanings of freedom, democracy and development. It specifically addresses: How can Empire be understood as a category of analysis? What distinguishes an American Empire? How are U.S. imperial formations negotiated “at home”? The course, in addition, foregrounds the U.S. relationship with Latin America in order to further question the meanings of home, America and Empire. Readings include texts from the disciplines of history, law, literature, political theory and cultural studies.

Notes

Same as HIST-UA 282 001.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1360 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Path of the Storyteller: Writing Children's Fiction

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Maryrose Wood

Description

From Charlotte’s Web to the Harry Potter series, the enduring works of children’s fiction epitomize the twin virtues that all classic novels share: a great story, beautifully told. Through reading and discussion of assigned texts, and in-class workshopping of the students’ own novels in progress, this class offers writers of fiction for the middle-grade reader (ages 8 through early adolescence) a solid foundation in the principles of storytelling and the tools of the writer’s craft. Through writing exercises and close reading of assigned books, we’ll examine character, conflict, point of view, and other elements of fiction. We’ll improve the quality of our prose by learning to recognize common errors and revise our drafts into polished, finished works. Assigned reading are drawn from the best of children’s literature and trace the development of the form, from early 20th century classics (Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables , Tolkien’s The Hobbit ) to later novels by E. B. White, Madeleine L’Engle, Judy Blume, Roald Dahl, and others. We’ll end by looking at work by contemporary writers such as Neil Gaiman, Louis Sachar and J.K. Rowling.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

CLI-UG1443 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Lyrics on Lockdown: Young Women in the Prison System

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Piper Anderson

Description

Rates of detention amongst girls in the US continue to increase even as overall rates of incarceration amongst youth have steadily declined in the last decade. Yet, because girls represent a proportionally smaller population within the Juvenile Justice system fewer resources are allocated to address the underlying causes of incarceration and recidivism amongst young women ages 12-19. This course investigates the causes and experiences of incarceration amongst girls and women, as well as help students design and facilitate an arts and education program for incarcerated girls. What are the unique concerns presented by incarcerated female populations? What must we understand about the policing of gender and sexuality in order to meet the needs of incarcerated girls and women? What role does trauma play in the experiences of girls remitted to the juvenile justice system? What is the role of the arts in empowering inmate populations? Exploring these and other questions enables students to better understand the role of the Prison Industrial Complex in defining and policing gender roles and sexual minorities. Students are required to attend Saturday sessions at Riker’s Island Correctional Facility where they design and facilitate a Lyrics on Lockdown program. Readings include The Color of Violence: The Incite! Anthology by Women of Color Against Violence, Global Lockdown: Race, Gender, and the Prison-Industrial Complex by Julia Sudbury, Theatre for Community, Conflict and Dialogue by Michael Rohd, and Picture Me Rollin’ by Black Artemis.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

IDSEM-UG1324 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Baseball as a Road to God

4 units Tue
6:45 PM - 8:45 PM
John Sexton

Description

Baseball As a Road to God aims to link literature about our national pastime with the study of philosophy and theology. This seminar aims to blend ideas contained in classic baseball novels such as Coover's Universal Baseball Association , Kinsella's Iowa Baseball Confederation , and Malamud's The Natural with those found in such philosophical/theological works as Eliade's Sacred and Profane , Heschel's God in Search of Man , and James' Varieties of Religious Experience . It discusses such themes as the metaphysics of sports, baseball as a civil religion, the nature of sacred time and space, and the ineffability of the divine. Not for the faint-hearted, this course requires students to read over two dozen works of varying lengths in addition to supplemental readings as they might arise. The course also requires weekly papers. As with any serious commitment of one's time, the rewards of taking a seminar such as this can be great.

Notes

Open to sophomores and juniors. Permission required. Application can be downloaded on the course description page (click on the course title above) or picked up at 1 Washington Place, 8th Floor Reception. Download application Application deadline is Friday, November 30. (Seniors who wish to apply should contact Prof. Sexton at president@nyu.edu.)

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1564 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Advanced Poetry Writing

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Emily Fragos

Description

A workshop designed for serious poets, this class teaches students how to take their writing to another level both intellectually and artistically; depth of theme, imagination, and craft are discussed. Emphasis is placed on developing and strengthening one’s personal style and voice. Through work-shopping, students further refine their critical eye as poet and reader. The class includes exercises and readings. Submission of work will be discussed and encouraged.

Notes

Prerequisite WRTNG-UG 1560 or CRWRI-UA 817 or CRWRI-UA 830 or permission of instructor. Students may take Advanced Poetry Writing two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

INDIV-UG9450 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

SHANGHAI: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-SHANGHAI. Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Visit the What's Next blog for admitted students for application information. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

WRTNG-UG1430 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Literary Translation

4 units Mon
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Idra Novey

Syllabus

WRTNG-UG1430

Description

This course introduces students to the craft of literary translation and the many ways it can help them become more innovative writers. Students work individually and together to choose authors not yet known in English whose work strikes the students as distinctive and exciting. We discuss how the process of choosing a writer they admire and bringing that author’s work into English is a way to explore what makes a piece of writing stand out from other works of the same period. We talk about translating tone, humor, voice and innuendo and explore how students might experiment with these aspects in their own work. Over the course of the semester, we’ll workshop translations together with original writing the students generated while working on their translations. We'll also look at the work of leading writer-translators like Christian Hawkey, Sawako Nakayasu, Lydia Davis, and Charles Simic and discuss the aesthetic connections between the authors they've translated and their own prose and poetry.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

ARTS-UG1431 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Of Fire and Blood: Art-making, Culture and Mythology in Mexico

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Jaime Arredondo

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1431

Description

A rich landscape of art and culture flourished in Mexico for thousands of years beginning with the Olmec civilization at around the second millennium before Christ. With the arrival of the Spaniards in 1519, a new hybrid culture resulted from the fusion of two different worlds, the Iberian and the Native American: a fusion which continues to exist and grow to the present day. This interdisciplinary workshop closely examines the art, culture and mythology of Mexico, both before and after the conquest, and combine our study of it with hands on art making. The course begins with a brief overview of the major Mexican muralists, Rivera, Orozco, and Siquieros, and American artists who were influenced by them such as Guston, O'Keefe, and Pollock. It then moves chronologically from the Olmec culture occurring 4,000 years ago; Teotihuacan, or the City of the Gods; the Toltecs of Tula, from which emerged Quetzalcoatl the "Feathered Serpent", a figure that inspired art for centuries; the hyper-religious Aztecs; the large and complex Mayan culture; and lastly, the new hybrid art formed by the synthesis of Spanish and Native American cultures. Topics to be covered include: astrology/astronomy; religion and shamanism; mythology; and human sacrifice. Museum trips, slide shows, videos, and the reading of rare texts such as the Popul Vuh are also scheduled.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1693 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Travel Narratives

2 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Steve Hutkins

Description

This course examines several nineteenth- and twentieth-century travel narratives in an exploration of the experience of travel and the many questions it raises about social identity and cultural difference, the traveler's search for adventure and “authenticity,” the relationship between tourism and colonialism, and the pervasive use of travel metaphors in the discourse of postmodernism. Readings include a variety of nonfiction travel books, such as Flaubert in Egypt , Orwell's Down and Out in Paris and London , Chatwin's Songlines , Theroux's The Old Patagonian Express , Phillips’ The European Tribe , and Jamaica Kincaid’s A Small Place, as well as scholarly articles about the genre of travel narrative and the sociology of travel.

Notes

Course meets 3/26 - 5/9 only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1563 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Women’s Text(iles)

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Myisha Priest

Description

Textile arts have been so firmly linked with women’s writing that one of the central metaphors of women’s writing traditions has become the metaphor of the quilt. This course explores this metaphor that proposes the making of beautiful, functional wholes out of fragments and scraps, using it to explore the cultural work of African American women and illuminate connections between writers and artists. This rich intersection of writing and art allows us to consider broader questions about power; we investigate the ways in which the written works and textiles articulate, challenge and transform representations of race, gender, sexuality, as well as the meanings of art. This course takes us out into the city, where we view the textile creations of Black women artists like Faith Ringgold, Brenda Amina Robinson and Carrie Mae Weems at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim, the American Craft Museum, and the Museum of Folk Art. Written texts may include: Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Gloria Naylor, Mama Day; Faith Ringgold, Tar Beach; Ntozake Shange, Sassafras, Cypress and Indigo. We also participate in a quilt-making workshop, where each student creates his or her own textile interpretation of the major issues of the course.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1682 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

What Is Global About Gender?

4 units Wed
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Ritty Lukose

Description

This interdisciplinary seminar explores how discourses about women, gender and sexuality depend on and produce visions of the global, the transnational and the international. The project of identifying affinities between women across cultures and national boundaries has long grounded the work of scholars, journalists, social movements, institutions and activists in a variety of locations, both within and outside the Euro-American context. Such efforts are intended to forge enabling alliances and solidarities, often within the larger horizon of “women’s rights” or “feminism”, yet must navigate cultural and national differences, hierarchies within a global world order and complex histories imperialism. The course explores histories of feminism and empire that unravel how imperial visions based on the "civilizing mission" ground their arguments on the "treatment of women". We then explore the rise of a new post-war international order centered on human rights and the UN system. How and why are women and girls, gender and sexuality so central to this system? By examining development initiatives that target women and girls, anti-violence and anti-trafficking campaigns, and more contemporary discourses of the rights of sexual minorities, we explore how gender and sexuality become grounds for debating global, transnational and international visions. Readings include Kumari Jayawardena's Feminism and Third World Nationalism , Afsaneh Najmabadi's Women with Mustaches and Men with Beards , Are Women Human? by Catherine MacKinnon, Human Rights and Gender Violence by Sally Merry, Scattered Hegemonies by Inderpal Grewal and Caren Kaplan.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 721 003.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG730 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Adventure Narratives

4 units Tue Thu
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
Tara Gellene

Syllabus

FIRST-UG730

Description

Adventure narratives have been a popular sub-genre of both fiction and non-fiction for over a century. In such narratives, men and women typically seek out, or are thrust into, unfamiliar spaces where they confront elemental forces. Some adventurers traverse dramatic natural environments—the Arctic and Antarctic Poles, Mt. Everest—while others explore spaces of dramatic cultural difference. We explore how and why these spaces are represented as staging grounds for conflicts with principles of gender, power, and moral life. Students write three analytic essays and a longer research essay as they explore some of the following questions: Why are these conflicts desirable to adventurers and to those who admire them? How do these often masculine narratives represent women and domesticity, especially when dealing with women adventurers? How do they represent the people who populate the adventurous landscape? Are adventurers ultimately imperial or anti-social? Theoretical sources may include Immanuel Kant, Sigmund Freud, Mariana Torgovnick, William Cronon, and Frederick Jackson Turner. Other readings may include works by H. Rider Haggard, Rudyard Kipling, Amelia Earhart, Richard Burton, Ernest Shackleton, Jon Krakauer, Joseph Conrad, Cormac McCarthy, Jamyang Norbu, and Charles Johnson.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1622 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

International Human Rights

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Vasuki Nesiah

Description

Human rights has become the privileged political vocabulary for justice in a range of contexts: from Untied Nations meetings on the millennium development goals to media reports on Darfur, from court rooms adjudicating the treatment of Guantanamo detainees to street protests regarding the WTO. For some, it provides inspiration for struggle and progressive change. For others it carries the taint of illusory promises; a fig leaf for liberal hubris and imperial intervention. What historical dynamics have shaped this debate? What potential does human rights carry for different groups? Is human rights the language of dissent and revolution or is it the language of global governance? The course travels a two-pronged path—partly focused on key debates that have structured the history and theory of human rights, and partly focused on debates internal to specific topics such as torture, homelessness and genocide. In addition to key human rights cases, we read authors such as Phillip Alston, Talal Asad, Wendy Brown, Andrew Clapham, Karen Engle, David Kennedy, Susan Marks, Sally Merry, Samuel Moyn, Makau Mutua, Jacques Ranciere, Henry Steiner, Gayatri Spivak and others.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1024 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Magazine Writing

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Alex Halberstadt

Description

The most ambitious of the postwar American journalism to appear in magazines like The New Yorker, Harper’s, Esquire and The New York Review of Books gave rise to a new and distinctly indigenous documentary literature, with its own possibilities and poetics. In this class we explore how this body of work redrew the formal boundaries of longform reporting, the profile, the essay, personal history and cultural criticism. We consider the emergence of the narrator as a character, the uses of rhetoric, approaches to the sentence, tone, rhythm, and structure, as well as questions of veracity and credibility. Students try their hand at these forms while responding to readings that include James Baldwin, Ian Frazier, Joseph Mitchell, Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace, Donald Antrim, Janet Malcolm, Alma Guillermoprieto, George W.S. Trow, Lester Bangs, Wells Tower, Fran Leibowitz, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, Lillian Ross, Adam Gopnik, John Jeremiah Sullivan and Richard Rodriguez.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1716 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

Literature and Film of The Maghreb

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Hoda El Shakry

Description

This course explores twentieth century literary and cinematic works of the region of North Africa referred to as the Maghreb—namely Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia. We examine Arabophone and Francophone works representative of the diverse cultural, social and political histories of the region. In this regard, we address issues of linguistic and ethnic pluralism, colonialism, nationalist rhetoric, Arabization policies and Islamic reform. More crucially, the course asks how these works engage with the lengthy and often violent history of French imperialism in the Maghreb in relation to dominant and emerging narratives of national identity, language and culture. These concerns are framed alongside the theories of orientalism, postcolonialism, deconstruction and semiotics. We read works by Muhammad Berrada, Driss Chraïbi, Assia Djebar, Abdelkebir Khatibi, Ahlam Mosteghanemi and al-Tahir Wattar, in addition to watching the films of Moufida Tlatli, Rachid Bouchareb and Nouri Bouzid.

Notes

Same as COLIT-UA 800 003.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9402 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

PRAGUE: Civil Resistance in Central and Eastern Europe

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. Civil resistance is not the same as opting out of society or having views that go against the grain. It is fundamentally about deciding not to conform with repressive regimes. It is also about choosing a mode of action that brings with it personal dangers even when, as is usual, it advocates non-violence. This course examines the nature and significance of civil resistance in Central and Eastern Europe in the 20th century. In studying resistance literature (including poetry and song), art and film, we will draw on ideas and arguments from the disciplines of history, political science, literature, art criticism, film studies and psychology.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1722 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Writing the Present Day Life

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Judith Greenberg

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1722

Description

This course examines the impact of the digital age on questions of writing, identity construction, ethics, trauma and love. Our entry into the digital age has been compared to the cultural shift that occurred when the Gutenberg Bible enabled the wide distribution of the written word. What is the relationship between the “spirit of an age” or Zeitgeist and its narratives and texts? For example, at the end of Virginia Woolf’s novel Orlando (1928), her time-traveling and sex-changing Elizabethan hero-ine Orlando, enters “the present day.” By the novel’s end, Orlando has grown into a young woman in “present day” London. Who might Orlando be today? Reading a range of texts including Whitman’s Leaves of Grass , Duras’ The Lover , essays on the gaze and gender and trauma and contemporary representation, Cindy Sherman’s photographs and the films Persona and Modern Times , we explore identity and writing, in previous periods and in the Digital Age. We conclude with students writing their own last chapter of Orlando , situated in New York, 2012.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1407 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Introduction to Painting I

4 units Mon
8:55 AM - 12:15 PM
Meleko Mokgosi

Description

Basic technical and conceptual principles of painting through in-the-studio practice. The relationship between form and content (technique and concept) is informed by art history and theory. Therefore, such processes as palette orientation, paint manipulation, and canvas preparation are determined by their appropriate use according to chosen time.

Notes

Same as ART-UE 103 007. Lab fee: $350.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1514 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2013

Science and Religion

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Matthew Stanley

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1514

Description

In this course we examine the complex interactions between science and religion through history. While most popular presentations of science and religion often descend into simplistic models of conflict (the secular nature of modern science and its repeated conflicts with religion) or cooperation/co-existence (science and religion each have clearly defined domains), we explore a wider variety of relationships between the two. Moving beyond claims of superiority or mutual isolation, we consider the complicated negotiation of boundaries and proper authority between science and religion. We mainly focus on the relationship of science and Christianity, but we also discuss Buddhism, Judaism, and atheism. Topics include: religion and the laws of nature; how scientists can be religious; natural theology; evolution and religion; miracles and medicine; the social role of science and religion; and the nature of life. Readings may include: Augustine, Galileo, Hume, Darwin, Einstein, Dawkins.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG1905 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Senior Project

4 units

Description

The senior project is a 4-credit independent research or artistic project that a student pursues under the guidance of a faculty mentor generally in the final semester before graduation. In some cases, a student may choose to do a senior project in his/her penultimate semester and draw that project into the senior colloquium discussion. Senior projects may include, but are not limited to, a paper based on original research, a written assessment of a community-learning initiative, an artistic project such as a film or novel, etc. Successful completion of the senior project will be noted in two ways: the student will receive a letter grade for the course titled, “Senior Project,” and upon graduation a notation will appear on the transcript listing the title of the senior project. Senior projects deemed exceptional by the Gallatin Senior Project Committee will be awarded honors.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is December 3. To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include "Creating a Magazine," "Dante's Literary and Historical Background," and "Environmental Design." Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is December 3. To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

WRTNG-UG1505 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Writing Short Comedy

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
D.B. Gilles

Syllabus

WRTNG-UG1505

Description

This course introduces students to writing short humor, including political satire ( The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, Bill Maher ), sketch humor ( Saturday Night Live and in the tradition of Kids In The Hall, Mad TV, Upright Citizens Brigade ), monologues (David Letterman, Conan O’Brien, Jimmy Kimmel), observational humor (stand-up comedy), parody (essays, think pieces, video, YouTube) and improvisation. Students learn the difference between a sketch and a bit, how to create memorable original characters, how to write a joke from premise to payoff and where to find humor. Students experiment with writing a different specific piece each week, possibly including a parody of a TV commercial, fake news stories à la The Onion , a Letterman Top 10 list, monologue jokes for a talk-show host, humorous short films for Funny Or Die , and a humorous Op-Ed piece for The New York Times .

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

CORE-GG2018 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Proseminar: Popular Objects/Popular Subjects

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 8:20 PM
Karen Hornick

Syllabus

CORE-GG2018

Description

Historical and technological developments in media have changed the way we think about popular audiences—are they products or producers of culture? Is an audience a mass of subjects, or is it comprised of individuals who freely express personal tastes? This proseminar attempts to reach students with interests, practical or theoretical, in one or more of the following fields: media studies, literary and art criticism, history, sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, and philosophy (particularly aesthetics). Our gaze will most often fall upon objects and events generated for transmission via mass media, but we will also consider other phenomena (as studied and documented, for example, in legal studies, ethnography, or star studies). Particular questions may concern such themes as: the difference between high and low art; the intersection of culture and politics; the globalization of culture, art as commodity and mass object; the value of fan studies and Henry Jenkins’s concept of “participatory culture”; and the place of desire, pleasure, and the perception of beauty in mass-produced or popular culture. Major class readings may include classic arguments by Max Weber, Karl Mannheim, Theodor Adorno, Raymond Williams, Stuart Hall, Pierre Bourdieu, Roland Barthes, Michel de Certeau, Michel Foucault, and Edward Said.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

HIST-UA283 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Origin of Humanity: A Modern Obsession

4 units
Section 006
Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

<div><font face="Humanst521 BT" size=1>In its attempt to reexamine and reinterpret the sources and consequences of human knowledge, the Enlightenment irrevocably displaced the widely accepted biblical explanation of the origin of man, his creation in the image and resemblance of God. With this displacement was born, or reborn, a largely new set of questions: Where does man come from? What was early humanity like? How has mankind changed or progressed since those early times? How long ago were those early times? Did culture proper emerge in Greece? In India? At a historical fount of races and nations? &nbsp;In “primitive” culture? Which origin should be taken most seriously—that of the human species, or that of modern culture? Were the “early times” a kind of utopia that needs to be recaptured? And given change and progress, where is mankind today, and where is it going? What would be the effect of seeking to reconstitute, to bring about, a society based on this origin? &nbsp;These questions, and the history of the answers offered to them, will be at the heart of our course. &nbsp;At its most general level, the course is an introduction and overview of major themes in modern European intellectual history, focusing on the modern obsession with re-divining and often re-living the origins of man. We will be concerned with both philosophical texts and scientific efforts to identify and clarify this origin, with the political implications of such origins, and not least with efforts to identify who (which discipline? which political party?) should have authority for determining and using “the origin.” We will read some of the crucial texts in the period from the 1750s to the 1960s, tracing the answers offered by philosophers, anthropologists, biologists, linguists, and poets.</font></div>

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Type

CAS Course Sections Reserved for Gallatin Students (HIST-UA)

ARTS-UG1440 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Technology, Art, and Public Space

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Terence Culver

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1440

Description

This course explores the relationship of art, technology, and public space through the study of historical and contemporary examples, and through our own direct experience of creating and installing a work of public art. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of recent technological developments on public art, but in turn, we use public art to reflect on emergent cultural and social transformations in New York City. The course focuses especially on the evolution of both Times Square and Union Square in New York City, to understand how art, commerce, politics, and public life have competed and converged to influence social and political change over the years. But the experiential component of the course is a technology-based public art project (most likely involving large-scale digital media) that students plan and execute. The project most likely utilizes large-scale digital media, and the instructor secures the necessary funds to carry it out. Students keep a journal for the duration of the project, which is used to evaluate the project and to connect it to other coursework. Readings for the course are drawn from a number of sources, including: Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space; Rosalyn Deutsche, Evictions: Art and Spatial Politics; Barbara Goldstein, Barbara. Public Art By The Book; Hayden, Dolores. The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History; Bruno Latour, (Editor), Making Things Public: Atmospheres of Democracy; Malcolm Miles, Art, Space, and the City: Public Art and Urban Futures; Jacques Rancier, Jacques. The Future of the Image.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1726 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Novel and Society: Victorian Secrets

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
June Foley

Description

In the twenty-first century, the Internet arguably makes secrecy difficult, but the exposure of secrets is already an important theme in many 19th-century British novels. In part, this reflects a society in which identity seems increasingly malleable through greater social class mobility, the questioning of traditional gender roles, and imperialist opportunities. In these novels, fake identities conceal a murderer and a madwoman, among others. And the societal constraints inspiring the fictional secrets also led the authors to keep secrets of their own. The unmarried Wilkie Collins, for example, secretly maintained two families, using an assumed name when with one. But does the novel genre, particularly the "realist" Victorian novel, with its emphasis on an omniscient narrator and intersecting plots, have a special relationship to secrets? We attempt to uncover the answer by studying the well-known Jane Eyre , by Charlotte Bronte, and Great Expectations , by Charles Dickens, along with Wilkie Collins's The Woman in White , George Eliot's Middlemarch , and George Gissing's The Odd Women . Theory includes selections from Michel Foucault's History of Sexuality , Edward Said's Culture and Imperialism , Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar's The Madwoman in the Attic , and Judith Walkowitz's City of Dreadful Delight .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG804 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Transfer Student Research Seminar: Identity and the Cultural Construction of Race and Ethnicity

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Laurie Woodard

Syllabus

FIRST-UG804

Description

Identity: the ways in which we see our selves; the ways in which others see us; the dynamic relationship between these two seemingly distinct and often irreconcilable poles is the underlying theme of this first-year research seminar. We focus specifically on the ways in which we create, build, rebuild, and live our racial identities in constant dialogue with contemporary American societal constructions of race and ethnicity. Questions we explore include: what is race? Is it immutable? How do we know it when we see it? How is it distinct from ethnicity? What is gained and/or lost by considering or not considering race today? In what ways do other facets of identity, for example gender, sexuality, and class inform, challenge, reconstruct, or deconstruct our racial identities? We employ historical, sociological, and cultural lenses. Several short written assignments help students formulate, research, and respond to questions about racial identity in a longer final research paper. Texts include fiction, plays, theory and criticism such as Julia Alvarez’s How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents , Barbara Fields's “Slavery, Race, and Ideology in the United States," Kip Fulbeck’s What Are You? , Heid E. Erdrich and Laura Tohe's collection, Sister Nations: Native American Women Writers On Community , Edward Said’s Orientalism , and B.D. Wong's M. Butterfly .

Notes

Open to Gallatin transfer students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Transfer Student Research Seminar (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1572 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Writing for Television II

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Imani Douglas

Description

This workshop focuses on the writer as an individual in the often daunting, sometimes humbling "collaborative" world of TV writing. In this workshop, we work on capturing the voices, rhythm, and style of varied classic TV hits, while executing class writing assignments. Students test their discipline, motivation, and ingenuity as they complete their very own "spec script" of a show of their choice, presently on the air. Readings may include How to Write For Television by Madeline Dimaggio, The Sitcom Career Book by Mary Lou Belli and Phil Ramuno, and selections from Story by Robert McKee and How to Write a Movie in 21 Days by Viki King. Students are required to work in Final Draft software for class projects.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1535 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2013

Narrating Memory, History and Place

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Marie Cruz Soto

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1535

Description

This course examines how people imagine a place of their own through narrations of the past. The past, after all, is a contested terrain open to divergent interpretations that shape common understandings of places. The meanings bestowed on places dictate who can use them, and how. Thus, the ways through which people narrate the past can transform places. This course, therefore, explores the broad interplay between narrations of memory, history and place. It focuses, however, on the politics of historical narrations in struggles of disempowered communities to claim a place of their own. Course readings include literary and other scholarly texts like Jamaica Kincaid’s A Small Place , Michel-Rolph Trouillot’s Silencing the Past and Michel De Certeau’s The Practice of Everyday Life as well as writings by Edward Said, William Cronon, Diana Taylor, Steven Hoelscher and Doreen Massey.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1277 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Alchemy and the Transformation of Self

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Lee Robbins

Syllabus

IDSEM-UG1277

Description

The focus of this course is the history of the human being’s need for the experience of transformation. We explore the etymology of the word ‘transformation’ and ask ourselves why humans have invoked the ecstasies and agonies of the process to explore the breadth and depth of the human psyche as it moves toward greater degrees of consciousness of self and world. We answer these questions by tracing the ancient science of alchemical transformation from its roots in the Stone Age, through the Eastern spiritual practices of China and India, into the embalming practices of ancient Egypt and the astrological symbol system of the Greeks, culminating in the work of C.G. Jung who discovered the ancient art of alchemy as the philosophical antecedent and language to his own transformational psychology, and so introducing the ancient art into the post modern world. Readings include: Eliade’s The Forge and the Crucible ; Edward Edinger’s Anatomy of the Psyche : Stan Marlan’s Black Sun ; Edinger’s Mystery of the Coniunctio and selections from The Alchemy Reader and Splendor Solis, together with readings from Freud, Winnicot, Jung and Hillman.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CLI-UG1447 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Urban Policy and Neighborhood Change

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
René Francisco Poitevin

Description

Two questions inspire this course. First, what determines urban policy in New York City? What are the political and economic forces shaping the priorities and policies of the City of New York? Second, how do NYC neighborhoods—especially poor and minority ones—influence public policy in a context where the dominant "expert-knows-best" model of city planning makes it harder for those community members, not already conversant in the language of public policy, to make their voices heard? Using specific NYC neighborhoods as case studies—the Lower East Side, East Harlem, and the South Bronx—our goal is to develop a nuanced account of how urban and economic development works at the local level, and to deepen our understanding of the opportunities and challenges confronting community organizations that work on policy advocacy issues. Readings include: Harvey Molotch's Urban Fortunes , Tom Angotti's New York for Sale , Arlene Dávila's Barrio Dreams , Evelyn González's The Bronx .

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions in the arts, media, government, business, non-profit or community action sectors. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them to explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory, as well to pursue career options. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work anywhere from 8 to 24 hours each week; for each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, February 1. To register, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students registering for an Internship are required to attend one workshop: Monday, February 11 9:30am-10:30am or Tuesday, February 12; 12:30pm-1:30pm AND Monday, March 4 9:30am-10:30am or Tuesday, March 5, 12:30pm-1:30pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

INDIV-UG1801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work an average of 10 to 20 hours each week at the site and meet regularly during the semester with their faculty adviser to discuss the internship. For each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship, students are expected to attend two workshops about internships; keep a journal of their daily internship experiences; submit a progress report describing the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, February 1. To register, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students registering for an Internship are required to attend one workshop: Monday, February 11 9:30am-10:30am or Tuesday, February 12; 12:30pm-1:30pm AND Monday, March 4 9:30am-10:30am or Tuesday, March 5, 12:30pm-1:30pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

ARTS-UG1375 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Microphone Fiends: Hip Hop and Spoken Word

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Bryonn Bain

Description

From Gil Scott-Heron, Sonia Sanchez and the Last Poets to Slick Rick, Queen Latifah and Public Enemy. Amiri Baraka and Nikki Giovanni to Biggie Smalls and Nicki Minaj. Whether you prefer the blues of Hughes and Gibson, or the beats of Ginsberg, Fresh and Rahzel. If you root for battle raps from the likes of BDP, Lauryn Hill and Immortal Technique or the slam poetics of Beau Sia, Patricia Smith and Saul Williams -- you know Poets won’t stop building new worlds with the Word. Workshop verse for the page and the stage. Research, write, record, produce and perform original work and the verse of inspiring underground wordsmiths, while critically examining texts by and about legends from the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement and the Hip Hop Generation we are shaping here and now. (Prerequisite: read or perform 2-3 minutes of an original or "classic" of your choice.)

Notes

Permission required to register. Students must read or perform 2-3 minutes of an original or "classic" piece of their choice. Please contact Bryonn Bain (microphonefiendscrew@gmail.com) to schedule.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

SASEM-UG9250 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

LONDON: Seeing London's Architecture

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. London, like New York is a rich and complicated city. Unlike New York however, it has been continuously occupied for just under 2000 years. Almost every epoch of London’s history can be detected in the city’s architecture and distinctive streetscape. This course is designed to work in three ways. Firstly it is an opportunity to learn about London’s architecture and art by physically exploring it. Secondly this class is an introduction to sketching and keeping a travel notebook, a basic and useful skill that any liberal arts student should have an experience of. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, this course teaches how to 'read' a town or city. The ability to visually make sense of European built-environment should really help in understanding the architecture of New York City and, of course, town and cities throughout the United States, and anywhere else.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

FIRST-UG715 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: The Surreal Thing

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Eugene Vydrin

Syllabus

FIRST-UG715

Description

The Surrealist movement sought to transform the self and the world, each one by way of the other. The world was to be remodeled in the image of the liberated psyche, alienation and repression overcome by a passionate exchange between the self and its environment. Inside and outside would continually change places as the psyche discovered its own desires written in the cipher of material things and assimilated these fragments of reality into its language of dreams. Inanimate objects would come to life, speaking the language of the self, while the self would take its place among them as a fellow thing of the world. This class explores Surrealism as a method of perceiving the material world and a model for living in it. Students write essays based on close readings of literary and theoretical texts, as well as a research essay. Readings may include texts by Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, Walter Benjamin, Rosalind Krauss, Mary Ann Caws, Fredric Jameson, and James Clifford; poetry and prose by André Breton, Louis Aragon, Aimé Césaire, Claude Cahun, Djuna Barnes, Frank O'Hara, and John Ashbery.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1306 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Advanced Contemporary Musicianship

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
John Castellano

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1306

Description

This course is designed for those who want to learn how to make music together with others. The course work combines a study of contemporary popular music, in terms of form, style, and instrumentation, with a review of practical music theory and the development of functional musicianship skills. Students have the opportunity to apply what they have studied by performing in class on their own compositions as well as on compositions written by their classmates and the course instructor. In addition, each student writes and bring in for class discussion, a short paper on a musical topic of special interest to them. This course is appropriate for any student interested in furthering their understanding of music in general and contemporary popular music specifically. Access to a keyboard or guitar is recommended. The workshop meets in a professional, fully equipped, music studio where students have access to a wide variety of musical instruments.

Notes

Prerequisite: ARTS-UG 1305 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor. Lab fee: $35. Course meets at Drummer's Collective, 123 West 18th Street.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1480 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Photograph New York, Create Your Vision

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Jeff Day

Description

By giving us a sense of place, the city we inhabit recreates us. This documentary photography course explores New York City as the ever-changing environment in which we are involved. Embarking on a photographic project of their design, students depict a highly visible urban space (viewed as a world financial, cultural, artistic capital) through their own relationship to it: their ways of interacting, acting, and being moved. Classes prepare students to work on their position as photographers: as they make pictures in the streets of New York, they determine their own perception (vantage point, angle, point of view, framing) and establish a particular relationship with the audience (through scale, rhythm sequence, position, color). Exploring the boundaries between public and private space, feeling space and scale with the body (and not only with one's eyes) and creating a personal color palette are strongly encouraged. Students also explore a photographer's power to change audience perception, for example, through large scale installations inciting viewers to inhabit particular vantage points. Though documentary imagery is traditionally considered to establish a transparent relation to 'reality,' this course challenges students to recognize its created character and to recreate the city by influencing with their photographic intervention the ways it is perceived. Classes are highly collaborative, offering technical instruction, critiques of student work, debates on street photography, visual analysis and discussions with invited artists. Open to highly motivated students with or without experience in documentary photography; digital or film cameras welcome.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Friday, February 1. To register, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

FIRST-UG742 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: The Digital Commons

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Cecily Swanson

Syllabus

FIRST-UG742

Description

This course examines how artists, writers, and activists have used both physical and digital resources to transmit ideas about the world and to the world. What is the future of writing, reading, and thinking in an era where the Internet has become, in Jennifer Egan’s words, “th hum tht nevr gOs away”? The “commons” traditionally refers to the cultural and social goods shared by a public; we examine how the “digital commons” have transformed our understanding of public participation. What does it mean to be an audience in a digital environment that favors user interaction and what sorts of users do online communities reward (and discourage)? How should we best participate within these shared, but virtual, spaces? In examining the relationship between material collections (of books, paintings, or film footage) and information available on the Internet, we consider how written language informs digital text, how blogs interact with traditional journalism, how political movements take shape through both old and new media, and how technology alters aesthetic expression. Through this investigation, students develop strategies for effective research both on and offline. Readings include excerpts from Mcluhan’s Understanding Media ; Moretti’s Graphs, Maps, Trees ; Gitelman’s Always Already New: Media, History, and the Data of Culture ; Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad ; Crystal’s, Txting: The Gr8 Db8te ; and online materials. Students participate in a workshop at NYU’s Digital Studio, create and maintain a public blog, write two short analytic papers, a longer research paper, and a final reflective essay.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1050 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Performing Stories: East Meets West

4 units Wed
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Lanny Harrison

Syllabus

ARTS-UG1050

Description

In this course we create characters inspired by history, memory, dreams and world lore through challenging exercises that fuse Eastern contemplative traditions and Western theatrical improvisation. Students learn how to access different aspects of themselves to enhance their own creative process and create a uniquely authentic theatre. Each session begins with vocal exercises and physical warm ups, based on Taoist exercises and Western dance techniques. Our character work starts with meditations and visualizations employing the Buddhist tradition of "mindfulness/awareness" practice, in which we place ourselves totally in the present moment. We work in solos, duos and groups, gradually adding costumes, props and music. Open to theater students, dancers, musicians, visual artists, writers—all those interested in discovering their own source of deep invention. Readings include Chögyam Trungpa's Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior and Dharma Art , Louise Steinman's The Knowing Body , Ethan Nichtern's One City and John Welwood's Ordinary Magic .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG737 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

First-Year Research Seminar: Memory and the City

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Joanna Scutts

Syllabus

FIRST-UG737

Description

How does a city ‘remember’ the past lives of its inhabitants? How do the peculiar characteristics of a city like New York­—its population density, cultural diversity, and constant evolution—affect the memories of the individuals and groups who live there? This seminar explores the interplay between memory and the city through the study and analysis of literary texts, photographs, monuments, maps and movies. A wide range of theoretical readings provides us with a working critical vocabulary for investigating questions of cultural memory and memorialization. The research paper explores some aspect of the creation, ideology and reception of a commemorative site in New York City­. Sites could include major memorials such as the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, Ellis Island, or the Irish Hunger Memorial; a smaller museum or commemorative site such as the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, the African Burial Grounds, the Stonewall Inn, or the statues in a city park; or an unofficial, virtual, or erased memorial. Writers and artists may include Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin, James Young, Jane Jacobs, E.B. White, Susan Sontag, Colson Whitehead, and Woody Allen.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

SCHOL-UG600 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

Global Fellowship in Human Rights

0 units Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Vasuki Nesiah

Description


Type

Scholarly Communities (SCHOL-UG)

K20.1372 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2008

African Diasporic Art and Spirituality in the Americas: Honey is my Knife

units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM

Description

This seminar will investigate the cultural contributions of Africans in the formation of the contemporary Americas. There will be a particular focus on the African religious traditions that have continued and developed in spite of hostile social and political pressures. Because of their important roles in the continuations of African aesthetics, the areas of visual art, music and dance will be emphasized in the exploration of the topic. This seminar will also discuss two important African ethnic groups: the Yoruba of southwestern Nigeria, and the Bakongo of Central Africa. It will highlight the American religious traditions of these cultures, e.g., Candomble Nago/Ketu, Santeria/Lucumi, Shango, Xango, etc., for the Yoruba, and Palo Mayombe, Umbanda, Macumba, Kumina, African-American Christianity, etc., for the Bakongo and other Central Africans. In the course discussions, the Americas are to include Brazil, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, the United States and numerous other appropriate locations. There will also be a focus on visual artists like Charles Abramson, Jose Bedia, Juan Boza, Lourdes Lopez, Manuel Mendive, etc., whose works are grounded in African based religions. In addition, we will explore how African religious philosophy has impacted on every-day life in the Americas, for example in the areas of international athletics, procedures of greeting and degreeting, culinary practices, etc.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K40.1316 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2008

Playing Jazz

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

This workshop is designed for student musicians with the knowledge and skills of basic musicianship who want to learn to play jazz or extend their present ability to play jazz. Students will learn the fundamentals of improvisation: scale and chord structures, modes, chord progressions, rhythmic applications, song forms and options for organizing an improvisation such as creating a melody out of melodic fragments, scale fragments, and sequences. We will listen to great jazz performers to hear examples of good improvisation, proper phrasing and jazz styles. Students attending the workshop will gain a working musical vocabulary in the language of mainstream jazz. This workshop will offer students a solid starting point, whether they want to play professionally, for personal enjoyment or simply to broaden their knowledge of what it takes to play jazz. [$35 fee]

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

K20.1467 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2008

Painted Blind: Modern Tales of Madness and Love

2 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

While the ancients blamed mad love on potions and sorcery or the nature of love itself, modern writers associate inappropriate love with medical, psychological, and social causes.  Sigmund Freud’s writing epitomizes this point, as does that of one of his severest critics, Michel Foucault.  Is love today a sickness or the last trace of a human will to elude institutional power?  From Austen’s comic romance Sense and Sensibility, in which desire wages a quietly eternal war against decorum, to Truffaut’s  historical dramatic film The Story of Adele H, in which the maddest of unrequited-love stories plays out as a full-fledged revolution of one against all authority, modern storytellers continue to demonstrate that narrative remains an important source of enlightenment for those who would understand the relations of love, consciousness, and power.  Readings will include selected essays by Freud on love and sexuality;  Foucault’s History of Sexuality;  one or more of the following novels:  Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility;  Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita, and Emile Zola, Thérèse Raquin;  one or both of these films: Preston Sturges, The Lady Eve and Francois Truffaut, The Story of Adele H.

Notes

first seven weeks

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K70.2005 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2008

Proseminar: The Function of Art

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 8:20 PM

Description

Historical forces are transforming the arts and the roles of artists. New innovations are influencing creativity, producing major changes in the lives and work of artists. This proseminar develops an interdisciplinary approach to an understanding of the arts and artists in a social context. What are the key factors that link the evolution of he arts to ancient even prehistoric times and to the present? Is there continuity between the"ritual dramas" of First Peoples and the efforts to create arts based rituals in the present? How are the arts influenced by social change? How are artists interpreting and challenging the major social forces transforming the planet? In what ways are artists creating alternative visions of the future that influence our own daily lives? In exploring these issues, the seminar seeks to illuminate the contributions of art to an understanding of our age. Students produce their own evening of arts performances and projects. Readings may include Rilke's Letters to a Young Poet, Sarton's Journal of a Solitude, Berger's Ways of Seeing or Shape of a Pocket, Chaiken's The Presence of the Actor, Staniszewski's Believing is Seeing, Morrison's Playing in the Dark and Shawn's The Fever. Most important, students develop their own insight, vision and creativity, their own commitment to art and social action through brief writing assignments and class presentations.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

K20.1313 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2008

Ethics for Dissenters

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

This course is about dissent in a double sense: criticizing accepted ethical values, and criticizing old ways of philosophical thought about ethics. It is about affirmative ethics, not just criticism. Topics will grow from student questions and concerns, as well as the professor's. Suggested topics include viewpoints and skills to: (1) Criticize unjust ethical standards, e. g. sexist ones, and invent fair ones; (2) Choose ethical careers and life paths; (3) Recognize responsibilities to the larger community; (4) Resolve ethical dilemmas; (5) Justify visions of a better world; (6) Dialogue productively with adversaries; (7) Respect different ethical positions without "anything goes;" (8) Learn, and question, and still have principles; (9) Get beyond dead-end debate on idealism/realism, egotism/altruism, objectivism/relativism? (When is it justified to defeat adversies politically, as with civil rights laws? Is force justified, as in the American Civil War?) Readings from feminist, pragmatist, existentialist, ecological, nonviolence and conflict resolution, neo-classical, Marxist, and humanistic and developmental psychology approaches—as alternatives to mainstream Kantian and utilitarian ethics. Authors include de Beauvoir, Dewey, Emerson, Gandhi, Gilligan, James, Kohlberg, Marx, Maslow, Nietzsche, Nussbaum, Rogers, Sartre.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K45.1460 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2008

Literacy in Action

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM

Description

This course combines volunteer work in New York City adult literacy and English as a second language programs with an academic introduction to the philosophy, history, and current issues of basic education. Students will work as volunteer teachers of reading and writing oral English or mentors at such institutions as the University Settlement, Turning Point, International Rescue Committee, and Fortune Society. In class they will read about and discuss such key issues as which "basic skills" U.S. adults now need, which adults lack these skills and why, the implications for our economy, families, communities, and democracy, the instructional approaches developed for adults, and the steps that might be taken to build support for high-quality, adult basic-skills programs. Throughout the course, students will relate such issues to their own on-site experiences in class discussion and role-playing, and create a portfolio of writing that includes on-site observations, lesson plans, reflections, and a policy brief. Readings may include Auerbach's Making Meaning, Making Change; Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed; and the journals Focus on Basics and The Change Agent.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

K30.1549 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2008

Writers as Shapers: Strategies for Sculpting the Story

4 units Wed
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM

Description

A piece of fiction can be constructed in an unlimited number of ways and each week we will explore the formal possibilities that are available to us. We will study the choices we can make as writers—of narrative point of view, beginnings, resolutions, dialogue, description, pacing, plot and character development. We will isolate and inspect strategies that published authors have used. Students will produce and workshop their own fiction from exercises. In the conversation between student writing and the studied literature there will hopefully be a greater sense of writers as shapers, sculptors of the raw material of story. Readings: Mishima, Ha Jin, Russell Banks, Charles Baxter, C.J. Hribal, Carver, Flannery O'Connor, Isaac Babel, George Saunders, James Joyce and others.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

K20.1507 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Abroad at Home

2 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Description

This course is for students preparing for a study-abroad experience during spring 2009.  Working in small groups and on individualized projects, students read travel literature and other works about the place they’re going, study its culture (art, architecture, music, history, food, etc.), and work with maps, guidebooks, and other orientation tools.  In order to practice getting into the mindset of the traveler, the course also encourages students to look at New York through the eyes of the foreigner by exploring the city as a tourist (visiting museums, tourist attractions, etc.) and by reading travel writing about New York.  Students are required to blog about their responses to the readings and other assignments, and to work with the students abroad who are taking The Art of Travel course.  Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel, Urry’s The Tourist Gaze, MacCannell’s The Tourist, and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler.  For more information, see the course website: placeandliterature.com.

Notes

2 credits; last seven weeks

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1318 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Shakespeare and the London Theatre

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Description

In this class we will take a visit to London in the years 1590 to 1616, in search of Shakespeare and the London in which he lived and wrote. During this period, London at the height of its Renaissance power, was a center of dramatic arts unparalleled in the rest of Europe. Volumes of plays were written, theaters were built all over London, and each day, during the season, those theaters were filled with audiences who were drawn from every social and economic class and both genders. Theater was a craze. It was the center of cultural life in London. And in the center of this remarkably, vibrant creative world, Shakespeare was a superstar. We will examine the city of London, Shakespeare, and theater from literary, historical, political and cultural perspectives. Our consideration of the theater will be in relation to the roles women played as performers and to other forms of popular entertainment, such as dancing and mountebank performances. We will read a selection of plays written by Shakespeare such as As You Like It, Much Ado About Nothing, Richard III, Othello, and The Tempest. We will also see film versions of some of the plays and go to the New York theatre.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K30.1560 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

The Art and Craft of Poetry

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM

Description

In this workshop poets will focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer's process. A weekly reading of a poem by each poet in the circle will serve as point of departure for discussions of the relationships of craft and expression. The emphasis is on inhabiting the quality of language; some time is spent at defining clarity, aesthetics, elegance, and eloquence. The course also covers a brief review of some of poetry's history, including metric and syllabic measures of writing.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

K20.1193 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Culture as Communication

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Description

This course examines the concept of culture through its forms of communication. The shift from orality to literacy and on to electronic processing has important consequences for the social, political, and economic structures within a culture. If we take as axiomatic that every culture wishes to preserve itself through its forms of communication, we then need to ask ourselves which forms of communication are best suited for this purpose. What happens to cultures when traditional forms of communication are forced to compete with the newer technologies? What do we mean by "knowledge" in the age of information? The impact of written narrative on orality will be discussed as well as the changes brought about by the invention of the printing press. We will examine the development of electronic media including the newer technologies such as the Internet and analyze their effects on individual and cultural levels. Readings may include Plato's Phaedrus, Ong's Orality and Literacy, Achebe's Things Fall Apart, McLuhan's Understanding Media, and selected readings on Internet culture.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K40.1405 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Drawing and Painting

4 units Fri
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM

Description

This workshop is designed to provide both beginning and advanced students with studio experience in drawing and painting. The human figure will be the primary focus of this studio, although still life and other sources will also be used. A variety of drawing and painting media will be a part of the studio as well as discussions of required gallery and museum visits. An important part of this course will be the exploration of the problem of visual form and the development of mature aesthetic judgment. Students with extensive experience in painting or drawing, will have an opportunity to select their media in the studio. Selected work produced during the semester will be exhibited at the Gallatin School.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

K70.2335 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Master's Thesis and Defense

3 units Thu
6:20 PM - 8:00 PM

Description

Students registering for this course meet in the beginning of the semester with the thesis reviewer to discuss the procedures for organizing and presenting the thesis. It then becomes an independent project with the student's adviser to complete the thesis. Students are required to register for Thesis and Defense when they have completed 37 credits in the M.A. program. This course is required for completion of the master's degree program.

Notes

pass/fail only. course meets one time only on monday, january 25, 2010. Access code required to register; please go to Gallatin's Office of Student Services.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

K20.1421 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Wallace Stevens and the 20th Century

2 units

Description

Wallace Stevens holds an important place among modern American poets, yet his readers continue to puzzle over Stevens’ work, especially as it relates to the most pervasive concerns of the twentieth century. In his poetry, he writes very little about specific cataclysmic events of his time, yet Stevens ponders questions of faith in a secular world, considers heroism and loss in a century marked by two world wars, and probes our human relationship to nature in an increasingly industrialized and technological world. In this course, we will take a close look at Stevens’ relationship to the twentieth century.  While his poetry will be at the center of the class, we will focus our attention on how Stevens gives voice to the contradictions and complexities of the modern world.  Stevens’ own work will be the main text of this course, yet readings will include contextual material drawn from literary criticism, intellectual history, philosophy, and politics.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1475 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

American Politics After 9/11: Empire, Race and Democracy

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM

Description

The central goal of this course is to examine the strange relationship between democracy and empire displayed repeatedly in history: the Athenian polis, the Roman republic, parliamentary Great Britain, and the United States have professed democratic principles while practicing imperial politics. We will read in previous moments but will focus on the American case. Partly, we ask theoretical questions: What does it mean to call a state an “empire”? In what ways are “democratic” and “imperial” practices related? Partly, we ask historical questions: What is the relationship of democratic principles, exclusionary practices, and national expansion in American history? Partly, we assess how post-9/11 politics repeats and transforms inherited political languages and historical patterns of conduct: Is the post-9/11 “war on terror” both unprecedented and necessary, as many critics claim? Or is it related to historical white supremacy over Indians and slaves, and to a hundred years of anxiety about aliens and communism? Partly, we will use theory and history to ask political questions: Does global power now threaten democratic practices? If we have entered a “crisis of the republic,” what is to be done? Readings range from Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War and William Carlos Williams, In the American Grain, to current  arguments by political theorists about post-9/ll politics.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1387 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

The Photographic Imaginary

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

In this seminar we will examine some of the most provocative ways in which photography has been imagined and practiced over the past century and a half, from early accounts of the daguerreotype to recent work on the digital image.  Through close examination of photographic practices and the critical discourses that have grown up around them, we will endeavor to understand not just what André Bazin calls the “ontology” of the photographic image, but also how the photograph gets thought about, talked about, utilized and, in turn, produced fantasmatically as a particular kind of object and a special way of picturing.  Readings may include Barthes, Bazin, Benjamin, Fox Talbot, Kracauer, Manovich, Metz, Sontag, Tagg.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1517 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Nationalisms in South Asia

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Description

This course works at two levels: 1) to introduce the history, culture, economy and politics of South Asia and 2) to explore nationalism as a dynamic, fraught, and powerful force within third world societies.  We begin with histories of pre-colonial and colonial South Asia, focusing on historical dynamics and imaginative representations through which the region has been understood. We explore colonialism and analyze anti- colonial nationalisms as political and cultural projects that re-shape religion, community, family, gender and kinship. We then examine the moment of Indian independence and the violent experience of Partition, as well as the different ways that development and nation have been articulated across the region. Finally, we examine contemporary struggles around nationhood in Sri Lanka, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and India. Readings may include: Sanjay Subramaniam and Amitav Ghosh on the Indian Ocean World; Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy by Sugata Bose; the writings of Gandhi, Nehru, and Jinnah; subaltern studies and post-colonial theory; studies of marginalized groups in India and Pakistan; and Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K30.1550 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Fiction Writing

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

Fiction Writing is a course in two parts. Each class will begin with a craft discussion, along with group exercises and some lecture. We'll go over reading assignments and short homework assignments designed to stimulate classroom discussion. The second half of each class is devoted to the workshop process, where we examine the writing of you and your classmates. The craft portion will be concerned with the mechanics of writing fiction as well as analyzing the content of short stories; in other words, not only how to improve your fiction sentence-by-sentence, but also how to include the right details to do the job. Workshops involve very close reading and supportive discussion, and every member of the class is required to participate in that process as both an author and a reader.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

K20.1518 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Globalization: Promises and Discontents

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Description

In popular and scholarly discourse, the term "globalization" is widely used to put a name to the shape of the contemporary world. In the realms of advertising, policymaking, politics, academia, and everyday talk, "globalization" references the sense that we are now living in a deeply and ever-increasingly interconnected, mobile, and speeded-up world that is unprecedented, fueled by technological innovations and geopolitical and economic transformations. Drawing on perspectives from history, anthropology, cultural and literary studies, geography, political economy, and sociology, this course will explore theories, discourses, and experiences of globalization. Running through the course are three central concerns: 1) exploring claims about the "new-ness" of globalization from historical perspectives, 2) examining how a variety of social and cultural worlds mediate globalization and 3) analyzing a contested politics of globalization in which the opportunities for social mobility and transformation are pitted against renewed intensifications of exploitation and vulnerability along long-standing vectors of difference and inequality. Readings include: World Systems Theory; theories of globalization in the social sciences; studies of environmental and indigenous rights activism, gender and labor issues, and consumer culture; as well as a selection of films and novels.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1420 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Reading Poetry

2 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Description

Poetry is an art which can express our deepest feelings and thoughts about our human experience. Too many of us, however, encounter poetry timidly.  We wonder how we can make meaning of poetic words and rhythms so distinct from those we use in our daily lives.  In this course, we will work at developing poetic sensibilities, not by digging to find clues to the mysterious meanings of poems, but by gaining an understanding of how to read poetry as a language within a language.  We will study how the concentrated language and sounds of poetry help us to grapple with the shades and subtleties of our own experience.  The course will begin with a study of various verse forms, and then focus on the art of close reading.  We will read many poems ranging from early English lyrics, popular ballads, and Shakespeare’s sonnets, to modern and contemporary poems, as well as poems originally written in other languages.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1248 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Thinking Politically

4 units Mon
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM

Description

Two purposes shape this course. One is to explore our ambivalence towards and alienation from "politics." What does our apathy and cynicism say about politics as it is practiced in our society, and what does it say about ourselves? To pursue these questions means setting a second goal: to analyze what politics—as a concept and a practice—has meant in history, means to us now, and could mean. We begin by closely reading several canonical texts in political theory. We proceed by using more modern texts to explore different "dimensions" of political life: the ways we conceive and pursue interests; the ways we are motivated by often unconscious drives, anxieties, and fantasies; the role of culture in the form of narrative and identity; the place of rhetoric, persuasion and performance, since politics happens through speech on public stages; and lastly, different ways of understanding and practicing democracy. Our basic goal is to learn how to "think politically" about the world, by learning to understand politics in conventional and unconventional senses.  Readings include: More, Utopia; Machiavelli, The Prince and The Discourses; Marx, selected writings; Dinnerstein, The Mermaid and the Minotaur; Baldwin, The Fire Next Time; Foucault, The History of Sexuality; and Arendt, "What is Freedom."

Notes

[sophomores only]

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1454 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

The Iliad

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

"The poem of force," according to Simone Weil, the Iliad is also a poem of forceful influence.  In this course we will read the Iliad intensively, followed by an examination of its heritage on the dramatic stage.  In the first half of the semester we will primarily explore the Iliad in terms of the poetics of traditionality; the political economy of epic; the ideologics of the Männerbund (the "band of fighting brothers"); the Iliad's uses of reciprocity; its construction of gender; its intimations of tragedy. In the second half of the course, informed by a reading of Aristotle's Poetics, we will focus on responses to the Iliad in dramatic form: possible readings will include Sophocles' Ajax; Euripides' Iphigeneia in Aulis; Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida; Racine's Andromaque; Giraudoux's La guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu; Ellen McLaughlin's Iphigenia and Other Daughters.  Students will give presentations on an Iliadic intertext of their own choosing.  [ No knowledge of Greek is required for the course, though those who wish to do reading in Greek will be offered assignment options.]

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K30.1555 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Advanced Fiction Writing

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM

Description

The aim of this course is to fathom why fiction works when it works, and why it doesn't when it doesn't. We will attempt to teach ourselves to read like writers, so we can learn from those who have come before, so we can began to write like writers. We will engage all the elements that give a fiction a chance at success--obsession, seduction, evoking of the senses, the removal of filters, scene and summary, theatre of the mind, et cetera. Students--and the teacher--will turn in three first drafts of fiction, each 10-14 pages long, to be critiqued in a workshop setting. The critiques will be rigorous but constructive; no nastiness allowed. We will also complete short, extemporaneous, writing exercises. Readings taken from The New Yorker, Zoetrope, and others.

Notes

Prerequisite K30.1550 or V39.0815 or V39.0816 or V39.0820 or permission of the instructor. Students may take "Advanced Fiction Writing" two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

K20.1055 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Struggle for the Word: History of Media I

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Description

The history of the media is the history of struggle, a battle waged over words and images: who produces them, who has access to them, and whose interests are served by them.  Beginning with the Bible and moving through plays and popular song; pamphlets, penny press and advertisements; this course will use the history of the printed word to explore enduring questions of power and culture.  Readings will range from Genesis and Plato to the forced confessions of a barely literate sixteenth-century miller, Thomas Jefferson to Frederick Douglass, slave songs to early newspapers, and writings of public relations impresarios like Edward Bernays to the words of the novelist James Joyce.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1298 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Ecology and Environmental Thought

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Description

Ecological science and environmentalism appear to be relatively recent developments, but they have long and deep roots in our culture. Their interrelated histories, their connections to broader intellectual, cultural, social and political trends, their sometimes tenuous relationship to one another over the past century, and their continuing interactions in the discourse over the fate of nature constitute the subject of this course. Topics include the Protestant roots of both ecology and environmentalism, myths of the primitive (biological, anthropological, etc.), the transfer of metaphors between social theory and ecology, changing views of equilibrium and balance in nature, conservative and postmodern critiques of ecology, and recent debates over biodiversity, global warming, and environmental justice. Readings may include Paul Colinvaux, Why Big Fierce Animals Are Rare, Rachel Carson, Silent Spring, Michael Lewis, Inventing Global Ecology, Vandermeer and Perfecto, Breakfast of Biodiversity, and DiMento and Doughman, Climate Change, as well as selections from Linnaeus, Darwin, Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, and a variety of contemporary ecologists and environmentalists.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1351 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Behind the Mask I: Exteriority

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

It can be argued that until the 1880s one thing was completely lacking in Japanese literary and performing arts: the notion of an interiorized subject. In fact, the premodern Japanese arts are examples of extreme “exteriority,” that privilege form, word play and intertextuality and enfold the human being and human erotic passions within rituals for purity, and harmony with a cosmology of the heavens. This course will explore premodern Japanese poetics and prose, performing and visual arts, from the very first writings through the nineteenth century, in relation to history and religious and philosophic belief systems such as Buddhism, Shintoism and Confucianism. Texts will include: selections of poetry, emaki (picture scrolls), noh and puppet plays, selections from The Tale of Genji, The Pillow Book, Essays in Idleness.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K45.1460 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Literacy in Action

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM

Description

This course combines volunteer work in New York City adult literacy and English as a second language programs with an academic introduction to the philosophy, history, and current issues of basic education. Students will work as volunteer teachers of reading and writing oral English or mentors at such institutions as the University Settlement, Turning Point, International Rescue Committee, and Fortune Society. In class they will read about and discuss such key issues as which "basic skills" U.S. adults now need, which adults lack these skills and why, the implications for our economy, families, communities, and democracy, the instructional approaches developed for adults, and the steps that might be taken to build support for high-quality, adult basic-skills programs. Throughout the course, students will relate such issues to their own on-site experiences in class discussion and role-playing, and create a portfolio of writing that includes on-site observations, lesson plans, reflections, and a policy brief. Readings may include Auerbach's Making Meaning, Making Change; Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed; and the journals Focus on Basics and The Change Agent.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

K45.1445 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Shifting Focus I: Video Production and Community Activism

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

From the taping of the police beating of Rodney King, to online advocacy, and the explosion of YouTube, video has become an essential tool for social and political actors. This course will be a hands-on class in video production in the service of political and community organizing. Class time will be used to: examine the biases of corporate-controlled media; learn the theory and history of video activism; develop basic camera and editing skills; and reflect on lessons learned in the field. Outside of class students will break into groups and collaborate with local community organizations in the conception and production of a short video piece, and subsequently strategize with those organizations about how to most effectively use video in their particular struggles. Readings will include selections from Noam Chomsky, Robert McChesney and Thomas Harding.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

K40.1621 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Architectural Design and Drawing

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM

Description

Gropius once described architecture as a combination of "form, function, and delight." In this workshop, students are introduced to the experience of designing buildings. The first project is an exploration of the design process. Students create sketchbooks of diagrams and drawings, analyzing issues of form, function, technology, site, and environment. Drafting techniques are also presented through preparation of plans, sections, elevations, and renderings. In the second project, students design a residential loft. They begin with a program and a basic design concept. Planning theories, such as function, circulation, massing, and spatial organization are discussed. Visual concepts, such as symmetry, axis, and proportion are also introduced. Methods for developing designs through models, perspectives, and isometric drawings are also presented. Prior drafting experience is helpful, but not required.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

K20.1311 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Mad Science/Mad Pride

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

In recent years, questions of madness and psychiatry have been the subject of considerable strife and controversy. This class uses narrative theory to map out the terrain of these conflicts and explore competing approaches to psychiatric concerns. We start with an overview of narrative theory as relevant to psychological issues. Authors we read include Jerome Bruner, Michael White, Tanya Luhrman, and Nikolas Rose. With this theory as our guide, the alternative approaches we consider include biopsychiatry, psychoanalysis, cognitive therapy, family therapy, feminist therapy, spiritual approaches, and creative approaches. We conclude with a consideration of the Icarus Project idea that sometimes madness is best seen as a “dangerous gift.”

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1509 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

The Streetroots of Latin America I: Introduction to the Urban Experience

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM

Description

“Gazing on such wonderful sights, we did not know what to say, or whether what appeared before us was real, for on the land there were great cities, and in the lake ever so many more, and in front of us stood the great city of Mexico” (Bernal Diaz, 1518).  When Europeans set foot on the “New World” they found a continent deeply shaped by a metropolitan experience.  Yet urbanization in Latin America is still seen as a recent phenomenon, the consequence of post-war industrialization and misapplied dreams of Eurocentric modernity. Together, these forces have fixed an image of the Latin American city as a site of endless contradiction—poverty and wealth, order and chaos, intimacy and isolation, hope and frustration.  Can we speak of an urban “culture” in Latin America, and if so, what are its features? In this first part of a two course sequence examining urban life in Latin America, we will trace changes and continuities in state policy toward cities and their citizens, from the pre-Columbian metropolises of Cusco and Tenochtitlan, to the colonial capitals of Lima and Rio de Janeiro, to the industrial centers of São Paulo and Buenos Aires. Readings range from the urban critiques of James Scott and Carlos Monsiváis, to personal accounts of city life by Flora Tristan and Carolina Maria de Jesús, and to the literary musings of urban misadventures by Machado de Assis and Mario Benedetti.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K45.1447 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Urban Policy and Neighborhood Change

4 units Thu
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM

Description

Two questions inspire this course. First, what determines urban policy in New York City? What are the political and economic forces shaping the priorities and policies of the City of New York? Second, how do NYC neighborhoods—especially poor and minority ones—influence public policy in a context where the dominant "expert-knows-best" model of city planning makes it harder for those community members, not already conversant in the language of public policy, to make their voices heard? Using specific NYC neighborhoods as case studies—the Lower East Side, East Harlem, and the South Bronx—our goal is to develop a nuanced account of how urban and economic development works at the local level, and to deepen our understanding of the opportunities and challenges confronting community organizations that work on policy advocacy issues. Readings include: Harvey Molotch's Urban Fortunes, Tom Angotti's New York for Sale, Arlene Dávila's Barrio Dreams, Evelyn González's The Bronx.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

K20.1508 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Societies and Cultures of the Middle East

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical, social, political, and cultural dynamics of the contemporary Middle East.  We begin with the history and geographical contours of the region, and explore its various cultures, religions, and political systems as we analyze issues concerning economic development, secularism, gender, and Islamic politics. We will attempt to identify the defining characteristics that distinguish the Middle East as a region, but also its internal diversity. To do so, we will use multiple disciplinary approaches and perspectives, anthropological and sociological, economic and political as well as the literary and cinematic.  Because the primary purpose of the course is to facilitate cross-cultural understanding, students will be asked to reflect on their own assumptions. Readings include: Dale F. Eickelman, The Middle East and Central Asia: An Anthropological Approach; Fatima Mernissi, Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood; Edmund Burke, ed., Struggle and Survival in the Middle East; Elizabeth Fenea, Women and the Family in the Middle East.

Notes

[sophomores only]

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1380 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Three Revolutions: Haiti, Mexico, Cuba

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

We compare and contrast the revolutionary events, processes and outcomes in Haiti, Mexico, and Cuba. None were simple reflexes of European or North American ideas and politics, although such external factors were among their causes and effects. Each had significant anti-colonial or anti-imperial components, as well as social and political conflicts and alliances within the immediate societies of the revolutionary countries which involved both "internal" and "external" groups and ideas. We consider the roles of such investors, landowners, mineowners, merchants, bankers, politicians, state administrators, peasants, laborers, intellectuals, migrants, and other social groups in-country or in the relevant imperial centers. We analyze interrelations among kinds of capitalism, and anti-capitalist ideologies or social forms and types of rationality; changing revolutionary processes and demands; changing role and organization of the state; the supporters or antagonists of the revolution among differing social groups at differing times; the revolution's relation to earlier and later movements. Where necessary, we invoke examples from other countries. Readings might include selections from Wolf, Peasant Wars of the Twentieth Century; DuBois, Avengers of the New World; Fick, The Making of Haiti; Trouillot, Haiti: State Against Nation; Gonzales, The Mexican Revolution, 1910-1940; Nugent, The Spent Cartridges of Revolution; Stephen, Zapata Lives!; Kapcia, Cuba: Isle of Dreams; Saney, Cuba: A Revolution in Motion; Pérez-Stabli, The Cuban Revolution.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1505 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2008

Russian Revolutionaries

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

Description

“Only in Russia is poetry respected—it gets people killed. Nowhere else is poetry so common a motive for murder.” So said the poet Osip Mandelstam before his own state-sanctioned death in 1938. What is the connection between art and politics in Russia? Why have artists been at once so vital and so brutally repressed? Making sense of this terrible paradox means exploring the relationship between art, ideas, and a history of state repression on an almost unprecedented scale. Rather than studying art and politics separately, in this course we will consider together poets, anarchists, novelists, liberals, playwrights, communists, romantics, and other revolutionaries who defy generic categorization. In this course we will examine the cultural history of Russia from Pushkin to Putin, considering Soviet culture alongside that of the Tsarist Empire and today’s capitalist democracy. We will focus on the themes of “Russia” and “revolution,” organizing our ideas around these central concepts at the same time that we call these categories into question. How have ideas about revolution shaped ideas of Russianness? How have narratives of revolution been told and retold? How has the role of the revolutionary changed over time? What is the relationship between Russian society and the state? We will look for answers to these questions in significant texts by prominent Russian writers, thinkers, and actors on the world stage. Through posters, paintings, films, cartoons, speeches, essays, poems, and prose, we will trace recurring narrative threads pulled throughout the last two hundred years of Russian history. Readings will include works by Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Bakunin, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Lenin, Mayakovsky, Stalin, Trotsky, Akhmatova, Khrushchev, Pasternak, and Solzhenitsyn.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

K20.1358