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Found 3653 courses
IDSEM-UG9150 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

BUENOS AIRES: Art and Politics in the City: New York and Buenos Aires

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. This course brings together students in New York and Buenos Aires to examine how urban arts and politics intersect in the Americas: How are art and politics understood and expressed differently and similarly in these two American metropolises and why? How do shared aesthetic features of public art in the city reflect the global circulation of urban creative modes? What do we learn about local politics from looking at the art and writing on a city’s public spaces? Teams of students in both cities will conduct field work in selected neighborhoods to help create an archive of murals, graffiti, performances, and installations. Then, drawing from readings in history, art criticism, and urban studies, as well as from census and electoral data and using GIS technology, we will analyze how social and political processes like gentrification, inequality, and planning generate and reflect creative political expression as captured in our database, culminating in transnational, collaborative projects that explore what the art and writing of city streets reveals about urban life in 21st century America.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1485 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

Beyond Picture Perfect: Personal Choice in a Digital World

4 units Mon Tue Wed Thu
2:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Jeff Day

Description

This course covers the very basic techniques of photography and digital imaging. Beyond Picture Perfect explores the many choices available to today’s image makers. New technology combined with traditional photographic techniques will be addressed, enabling the students to realize their distinctive image-making vocabulary. Daily discussions include understanding hardware mechanics, choosing a personal color palette, and recognizing “your” unique composition key. We will debate the many analog and digital tools available to photographers vital to their artistic expression. These concepts will be supported by daily assignments and class critiques culminating in a final project portfolio. Students with interest in analog or digital formats will be encouraged to develop an understanding of their medium and form an original visual strategy. Museum/ gallery visits and field trips for on-location photographing will inspire students to create their own way of seeing. Readings may include selections from: Robert Adams,  Why People Photograph ; London and Upton,  Photography .

Notes

This course is for beginners only, covering the very basic techniques of photography and digital imaging.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1029 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

Creating Drama from Character, in Collaboration with The New Group

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM
Ian Morgan

Description

For 20 years, renowned Off-Broadway theatre company The New Group has been premiering and producing character-driven, ensemble-based work. This course will immerse students in the company's approach, which emphasizes character and intimate, visceral ensemble work. Students will jointly develop new performance work through group improvisation and playwriting, while also studying multiple processes and theories of developing a new ensemble-based theatrical work for performance, taking playwright/director Mike Leigh's "improvised play" as a particular model. The course, led by Associate Artistic Director Ian Morgan, will feature master classes from New Group artists, including Artistic Director Scott Elliott.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1752 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

This Mediated Life: An Introduction to the Study of Mass Media

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM
Julian Cornell

Description

This interdisciplinary seminar will provide an intensive introduction to the study of mass media. Utilizing wide ranging critical and theoretical methodologies, the course will consider how media alternately reflects and forms our sense of politics, economics, race, gender, sexuality and citizenship. The course will be concerned with questions such as: What function does mass media serve for society? How does a media saturated cultural environment shape our identity? How do mass media forms delineate and naturalize prevailing ideologies and ways of being in the world? Can media provide a means to challenge cultural and political hegemony? Readings will be drawn from Berger’s Media Analysis Techniques as well as the anthologies The Media Studies Reader and Gender, Race and Class in the Media and the course will include excerpts from the films The Dark Knight Rises, The Matrix, The Truman Show, Network, Idiocracy and Catfish, television shows 60 Minutes, Family Guy, The Simpsons, South Park and The X-Files, as well as a selection of other media forms, including blogs, podcasts, radio programs, graphic novels, newspapers, magazines, music videos, social media sites and video games.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1542 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

Motown Matrix: Race, Gender and Class Identity in "The Sound of Young America"

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

In the 1960s Motown Records emerged as a dominant force in American popular music. Billing itself as “The Sound of Young America,” Motown established a lyrical and musical discourse through its records and albums that struck a responsive chord with white and black listeners alike. In this seminar we examine the race, gender and class identity that is inherent in—and emerges from—“The Motown Sound.” How did this company exploit the nationalist pride in the African American community while simultaneously positioning itself as a “crossover” enterprise to whites? What models of business and community did Motown emulate and create? And how did Motown affect the politics and racial discourse of its listeners? Our exploration situates Motown in the Detroit community of the 1950s and 1960s, to understand how it was “imagined,” and its impact on the wider culture. Readings may include excerpts from  The Origins of the Urban Crisis  by Thomas Sugrue;  One Nation Under a Groove  by Gerald Early;  Where Did Our Love Go?  by Nelson George;  American Odyssey  by Robert Conot;  Dancing in the Street  by Suzanne E. Smith;  Just My Soul Responding  by Brian Ward, and  Detroit: I Do Mind Dying  by Dan Georgakas and Marvin Surkin. The lyrics of Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, and Holland-Dozier-Holland as well as such films as  Standing in the Shadows of Motown  and  Dream Girls  may be included.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1698 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
EARLY
WI 2017

The Social Contract: Early Modern European Political Theory

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
2:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Justin Holt

Description

What holds a society together? This course will explore one influential answer to this foundational question within philosophy and social theory, namely social contract theory as it developed within early modern European political philosophy. Modern assumptions about the relationship between individual and society, private property and ownership, rationality, economics and the market, and rights and responsibilities of citizenship have all been shaped by social contract theory. But, even though this theory has enjoyed great influence, it has been severely criticized as unrealistic and biased towards individualism and property holders. We will read the foundational social contract works in this course and try to understand their assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses. The works to be read will include: Hobbes' De Cive, Locke's Two Treatises of Government, and Rousseau's The Social Contract.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1580 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

Between Rights and Justice in Latin America

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Alejandro Velasco

Syllabus

Description

What is the relationship between human rights and social justice? Do both always operate in conjunction? Are they ever mutually exclusive—one sacrificed at the expense of the other? This course explores key questions around the theory and practice of human rights promotion, surveying specialized literature and founding documents to consider the promise and challenge of existing human rights frameworks as they work for, but sometimes clash with, the promotion of social justice. We ask, are there universal rights? If so, how are these defined, and by whom? What is the relationship between "political" and "human" rights, between individual and collective rights? Can human rights be in conflict, and if so, how are such conflicts to be resolved? In regions rife with inequality—political, social, and economic—is promoting a global human rights agenda unrealistic, or more necessary than ever? After exploring these general questions, we will focus on Latin America, in particular on Argentina, Guatemala, Chile, Bolivia, Colombia, and Mexico. How do human rights struggles in these countries change our view of the prevailing human rights regime? How do legacies of colonialism in these countries affect both the protection and violation of human rights in the present? Do these countries reveal a political tension between social justice and human rights? Readings will draw from Bartolomé de las Casas, Immanuel Kant, John Rawls, Martha Nussbaum, Ariel Dorfman, Paul Farmer, and Greg Grandin, among others.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1014 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Something to Sing About: Acting in Musical Theatre

4 units Mon
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Ben Steinfeld

Syllabus

Description

The “American Musical” as it has evolved over the last century has become a remarkable model of interdisciplinary practice. From its early iterations and influences in burlesque, vaudeville, and operetta to the complex contemporary amalgams of book, music, lyrics, and dance, the American musical has proven a rich crucible for the exploration of identity and culture, form and content, and ideas and emotions. This arts workshop will offer actors a technical foundation for acting in musical theater. We will deal broadly with the history of musical theater in context by exploring both the process by which actors engage with musical material and the development and aesthetics of the form. Participants will work on songs and scenes taken from the giants of musical theater including: Rodgers & Hammerstein, Kander & Ebb, Stephen Sondheim, and more. How do we merge the receiving nature of acting with the giving nature of singing? How do we “justify” the decision to sing at all? Our survey of the evolution of musical theater will ask: What does the history of the American musical tell us about our cultural history? What do musicals teach us about the interdisciplinary nature of living in the arts? All students in this course must be comfortable and confident singing actors. Everyone will be required to rehearse outside of class time, complete written and analytical assignments, and commit to a public presentation at the end of the semester. In order to be accepted into this course, attendance at the first class is mandatory for all, including registered students.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1752 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

This Mediated Life: An Introduction to the Study of Mass Media

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Julian Cornell

Syllabus

Description

This interdisciplinary seminar will provide an intensive introduction to the study of mass media. Utilizing wide ranging critical and theoretical methodologies, the course will consider how media alternately reflects and forms our sense of politics, economics, race, gender, sexuality and citizenship. The course will be concerned with questions such as: What function does mass media serve for society? How does a media saturated cultural environment shape our identity? How do mass media forms delineate and naturalize prevailing ideologies and ways of being in the world? Can media provide a means to challenge cultural and political hegemony? Readings will be drawn from Berger’s  Media Analysis Techniques  and Jenkins’  Convergence Culture  as well as the anthologies  The Media Studies Reader  and  Gender, Race and Class in the Media  and the course will include excerpts from the films  The Dark Knight Rises ,  Idiocracy   The   Truman Show ,  Network, The Secret  and  The Bling Ring , television shows  60 Minutes, Ways of Seeing The Simpsons, South Park  and  The X-Files , radio programs  Amos ‘N Andy, Burns and Allen, This American Life  and  The War of the Worlds , as well as a selection of other media forms, including blogs, graphic novels, newspapers, magazines, music videos, social media sites and video games.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1842 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or EARLY
FA 2015

Ancients vs. Moderns

4 units Mon
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Frederic Clark

Description

Ancients and moderns have participated in constant dialogue—sometimes friendly, and sometimes hostile—that still shapes the complexities of our own approaches to the past today. This relationship has been figured in the metaphor of the modern dwarf standing atop the shoulders of the ancient giant, and seeing further thanks to the giant’s tall stature. This trope goes back to the Middle Ages, when medieval thinkers used it to express their relationship to the philosophers, poets, and historians of ancient Greece and Rome. While elegant, the phrase is decidedly ambiguous. Is the present better than the past? Or is the present only praiseworthy because of the past that preceded it? Could moderns ever be giants too? And what of conflicts, when moderns preferred to stand on their own two feet instead? As we will see, the story of “ancients vs. moderns” often proved counterintuitive. Moderns did not always advocate what we might regard as progress, nor did ancients always adopt outlooks that we might think traditional. This seminar traces approximately two millennia of conflict and compromise between so-called “ancients” and “moderns”—from ancient Greece to the world of revolutionary France and America. Students will explore competing constructions of antiquity and modernity through primary source readings from Cicero, Augustine, Peter Abelard, Petrarch, Erasmus, Bacon, Descartes, Gibbon and others.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9401 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

PRAGUE: Kafka and His Contexts

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. "A book must be an ax for the frozen sea in us," wrote Franz Kafka (1883-1924), one of the best known but least understood authors of our times. In this course, we will break some of the clichés which are stuck to Kafka's life and work and dive into the fascinating, intricate and profoundly humorous world of his thoughts and emotions. In Prague, the city that determined and held Kafka in its "claws", we will trace the possible sources of the writer's private obsessions which became the general characteristics of modern men: The sense of isolation, the anxiety, the self-irony, the sense of responsibility and guilt, the quest for freedom, the struggle of an individual against the system. We will read selected works of Kafka, but also Meyrink - the author of Prague ghetto - and Milan Kundera. This course aims to bring the students to a point from which they can find their own genuine and intimate understanding of Kafka's writing.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

CORE-GG2029 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Proseminar in the Arts: Why Do You Want to Make It, and How Can You Make It Better?

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Nina Katchadourian

Description

This course is intended for Gallatin graduate students with a creative project component to their graduate study. At its heart, the class aims to pose difficult and productive questions that will help you understand your tendencies and priorities as an artist, the methods you employ, and where these are in the service of the work as opposed to where they stand in the way. The class requires rigorous and individualized research into your sources of artistic influence with an emphasis on analytical thinking about the methods and strategies employed by those artists or thinkers you consider key influences. The course includes assignments that explore your existing strategies and subject matter in order to understand what has motivated and generated the work thus far. Other assignments push students to work against the grain of their usual modes in order to discover new ways of working and to undermine default strategies. Towards the end of the term, the accumulated insights will be channeled into writing about your work that will be useful in the future context of an artist’s statement or artistic aims essay. In the personal and lab-like atmosphere that this course hopes to cultivate, the class also aims to connect Gallatin graduate students to each other’s work and practice, and to take advantage of the enormous importance that peer input and critique can have on work in progress. Possible side effects include: focused engagement, enhanced motivation, collaboration.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1523 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

Feminism, Empire and Postcoloniality

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Marie Cruz Soto

Description

Jamaica Kincaid once said, “I now consider anger as a badge of honor. [It is] the first step to claiming yourself.” Anger, rather than Betty Friedan’s “problem that has no name,” has haunted the life of many women whose negotiations of the meaning of gender, race and sexuality are marked by the violence of colonial-imperial encounters. Accordingly, this course examines the following questions: How have colonial-imperial encounters shaped the imagination of gender, race and sexuality? How have women built feminist solidarities amidst, or perhaps based on, the shared experience of violence and anger? In turn, how has the imagination of gender, race and sexuality redefined the histories of colonies and empires? To pursue these questions, course readings include literary and other scholarly texts engaging feminist and postcolonial theory. Readings range from Kincaid’s  The Autobiography of My Mother  and Rigoberta Menchú’s  I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala  to other texts by scholars like Uma Narayan, Patricia Mohammed, Vandana Shiva, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak and Ann Stoler.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 721 002.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1341 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Metaphor and Meaning

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Stacy Pies

Syllabus

Description

Aristotle described metaphor in  The Poetics  as “the mark of genius, for to make good metaphors implies an eye for resemblances” (XXII). Since ancient times, poets and philosophers have written about metaphor and its power, while visual artists have transposed the techniques of figurative language from the verbal to the visual. Metaphor has been employed in texts as ornamentation, as a means of introducing new ideas and concepts, and as a way of imitating the working of the mind itself. In this class, we investigate how metaphor, verbal and visual, influences our processes of thinking, creating, and innovating, both intellectually and artistically. And we experiment with making our own metaphors, in words and pictures. Readings will range over poetry, philosophy, theory of art, and linguistics, including essays by Plato, Paul Ricoeur, I.A. Richards, Max Black, Wayne Booth, George Lakoff, and Rudolf Arnheim; poetry by Shakespeare, Campion, Rossetti, Rilke, Stevens, Wordsworth, and Bishop, concrete poetry, and Virginia Woolf's novel  To the Lighthouse .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1305 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Contemporary Music Performance I

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
John Castellano

Syllabus

Description

This course is designed to help students develop a better understanding of music by presenting the opportunity to experience music as a performing musician. Students learn basic music theory, develop rudimentary musicianship skills, and use that experience to compose, rehearse and perform original student compositions. The workshop meets in a professional music rehearsal studio where students have access to a wide variety of musical instruments and other resources. The culmination of the course is a public recital of works written and performed by students.

Notes

Lab fee: $35. Course meets at Drummer's Collective, 541 Avenue of The Americas (btwn. 14th & 15th Sts.).

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1144 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Free Speech and Democracy

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Paul Thaler

Description

The tension between free expression and social control has shadowed the Great American Conversation since the birth of this country. The constitutional ideal that our government "shall make no law" abridging free speech has given way, in fact, to laws that limit discussion, ostensibly for the public good. Likewise, new media technologies advance our ability to access and exchange ideas and information, but raise new questions as to the limits of such dialogue. This course, then, addresses the delicate balance between free speech and democracy, guided by seminal readings from Milton, Locke, Meikeljohn, among others, as well as important Supreme Court decisions that have critically shaped First Amendment rights in regard to hate speech, pornography, corporate control of mass media, the student press and the rights of journalists. The course also takes a case-study approach to issues related to free speech in wartime and political crisis, a tension made evident in recent debates over privacy rights and national security. With this foundation, we ask: Are there any forms of free speech that should be restricted? If so, which? And, who should decide?

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9350 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

PARIS: The French Art World in the Nineteenth Century

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PARIS. This course investigates French art of the nineteenth-century, paying particular attention to the way in which historical factors informed artistic production during this period. Beginning with David, Neo-Classicism and the French Revolution, we will move to the Napoleonic period, Romanticism, the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848, and trace the connection from Realism to Impressionism. The second half of the course will examine the disparate movements spurred by Impressionism, collectively referred to as Post-Impressionism (including Neo-Impressionism, Synthetism, and Symbolism), and will culminate with the rise of Art Nouveau at the end of the century. Throughout, we will interrogate how social forces (including politics, gender, race, religion, etc.) influenced the manner in which “Modern” art was produced and understood in nineteenth-century France. Conducted in English.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1841 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

American Road Narratives

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Amy Spellacy

Syllabus

Description

This seminar will explore the literary and historical significance of the road narrative in twentieth-century American literature and film. We will identify the defining features of the American road narrative and ask how stories of travel, especially automobile travel, have functioned as a forum for examining larger social and cultural issues. As we consider the possibilities and promises represented by travel in these stories, we will also interrogate how race, class, and gender affect the experience of being on the road. While the road might signify freedom and new opportunity for some, for others it is linked with desperation or homelessness. Throughout the course, we will think about the relationship between cultural texts and the historical periods during which they were produced. The ways that the automobile has shaped American cities, landscape, and daily life will be particularly important to us. Many of the texts in the seminar feature movement from East to West that evokes the conquest and settling of the U.S. West, a central component of the founding mythology of the United States. However, we will also contemplate different trajectories in the Americas that question the association between travel and conquest. Authors include Zora Neale Hurston, John Steinbeck, Vladimir Nabokov, Jack Kerouac, and Cormac McCarthy.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9102 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

BERLIN: Topics in German Cinema

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BERLIN. Berlin is one of the most well-known film cities in the world. This course wants to introduce you to the study of German cinema by looking at changing images of the city since the postwar period. The course will begin with an introduction to film analysis, giving special attention to the relationship between film and city. We will go on to discuss a number of influential productions from East, West and reunified Germany, and draw comparisons to other German as well as non-German city films. Through seminar discussions, reading responses, and critical essays, you will gain an understanding of how the cinema has engaged with the city of Berlin and its transformations since the end of the Second World War.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

FIRST-UG377 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: Working

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Chinnie Ding

Description

Visible and invisible, lonesome and collaborative, inspired and endured, labor makes and maintains the world we live in. To learn about work is to learn how most people spend most of the day, securing means, pursuing dreams, existing in active relation to other people—whether spreadsheeting or ship-breaking, trading or patrolling, composing or caretaking. How do we come to choose the work we do, and how to navigate the seeming injustices that come with the division of labor? What are the ethical and economic ties that bind us to the faraway strangers, or half-familiars we greet everyday, whose strenuous productivity we benefit from? How have art and literature depicted working people, and when does work go undepicted? What difference does work make for our notions and experience of time? Through topics such as globalization, class, migration, slavery, and unemployment, and genres like pastoral and documentary, this course explores the challenges that work has posed to political thought, political action, and aesthetic representation alike. Readings span fiction, oral history, poetry, philosophy, and art criticism. Films and a field trip or two will supplement the readings.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

FIRST-UG65 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Beyond Language: The Surreal, the Monstrous, and the Mystical

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Gregory Erickson

Syllabus

Description

Texts of the surreal, the monstrous, and the mystical are portrayals of experiences that, while they may be outside traditional logic, are clearly central to the human imagination. The texts studied in this course will reveal these experiences as metaphors of anxiety, depictions of radical subjectivity, and as manifestations of our unconscious fears and desires. Students are presented with the fascinating but difficult project of researching, interpreting, and describing irrational mental states often said to be “beyond language,” yet existing within language. Through discussion, informal writing, and experiential activities, we will take various approaches to understanding depictions of these experiences as well as their surrounding discourse. We will focus on issues of order vs. chaos, logic vs. irrationality, chance and fate, immanence and transcendence, self and other, and the concepts of nothingness, the uncanny, and the posthuman. Readings will include essays from diverse fields such as psychology (Freud, Lacan), science (Hawking, Sagan, Gleick), and literary and cultural theory (Haraway, Beal, Kurzweil), as well as surrealistic poetry, literary monster narratives from the Bible to  Dracula , mystical and devotional texts, and testimonies of paranormal encounters. We will also look at visual art, installation art, film, and television.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1408 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Drawing: Body and Narrative

4 units Tue
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Meleko Mokgosi

Description

The aim of this course is to examine and challenge representations of the body and how the body is used in constructing narratives through the medium of drawing. Students who are interested in making art that either tells stories or works against the narrative form, will have the opportunity to develop their ideas and skills in a challenging studio class. In addition to rigorous projects and reading assignments, we will look at and discuss the work of artists such as William Kentridge, David Shrigley, Charles Gaines, Charles White, Kara Walker, Robin Rhode, Ida Applebroog, Raymond Pettibon, and Kathe Kollwitz. In this course, students will work on both proposed projects and in-class drawing workshops dedicated to life drawing, using a variety of wet and dry media on various surfaces. In exploring the relation between bodies and narrative, we will ask: what is the relation between mimesis and narrative, and how is the narrative form used to produce history? Is it possible to create artwork outside of narrative? What is the role of a ‘narrator’ in the visual arts and how can this role be complicated? What are we to make of the ways that the revealing of one narrative may obscure others? Readings include essays by Michel Foucault, Fredric Jameson, Hayden White, Kara Walker, Jeff Wall, and William Kentridge.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG357 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: Wilderness and Civilization

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Andrew Libby

Syllabus

Description

In this seminar we will study a sampling of texts from various fields that deal with the tension between wilderness and civilization and the identities it enables. We will consider how the concept of wilderness sometimes doubles for that of nature in forming a dynamic identity we call “civilized.” Our studies will draw on insights from biology, ecology, anthropology, political theory, and literature. We will attempt to respond to such questions as: If wilderness is nature without humans, why are we so irresistibly drawn to it? What function does wilderness serve in our civilized lives? How has it become necessary to our imaginative, spiritual, and political lives? What does an investigation of “wilderness,” “nature,” and “civilization” allow us to express about the world we inhabit? What are the limits of these concepts—what possibilities do they disallow? We will examine these concepts in terms of how they work to create identity for humans, what ways of life they offer, what they obscure. And we’ll look closely at related concepts that structure our sense of ourselves, sometimes without our being wholly conscious of it: What does it mean to be natural, or live a natural lifestyle? Should social organizations follow nature, be “organic,” or go in a different direction? How natural is sex? gender? class? How does what we consider “natural” and “unnatural” affect the lifestyle options available to us? Our goal in this seminar is to think through these and related issues and to develop language that enables us to imagine viable alternative futures.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

SASEM-UG9550 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
FA 2015

TEL AVIV: Ancient Israel History and Archaeology: Travelers, Collectors, and Antiquities Robbers

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-TEL AVIV. The story of the archaeological discipline in the Land of Israel is strongly tied with the major developments that the region has undergone in the last two centuries. This course offers an overview of the history of archaeology in Palestine since the appearance of the first European travelers and missionaries in the mid-19th century, along the vibrant interest of collectors, forgers and robbers in the Promised Land, through the appearance of the first scientific excavations, the rise of the American biblical archaeology and its influence on local Israeli research. Special attention will be given to the way the newly born Israeli archaeology helped to establish the Zionist identity that wished to pass over two thousand years of Diaspora history; the methods by which the nascent Israeli archaeology connected new-comers to the land of the patriarchs and the manner by which Israeli scholars served state interests in the creation of the national Zionist ethos. The aftermath of the Six Days War and the increasing tension between the Bible and archaeology will be discussed in light of the intense debate over the historicity of the Exodus story, Joshua's conquests and the United Kingdom of David and Solomon. Finally, at the turn of the millennium, post-modern archaeology presented a new pluralistic view of the past. This multi-vocal framework will be used as a background for discussing the archaeology of otherness and minorities in 21st century Israel.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1566 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or EARLY
FA 2015

History of Environmental Sciences Before Darwin

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Peder Anker

Syllabus

Description

This seminar will provide an overview of the history of the environmental sciences from ancient times to Charles Darwin’s  The   Origin of Species . We will explore ways in which naturalists and lay people came to know the environment and in what ways nature could mobilize social and moral author­ity. With a focus on the history of the European environmental problems from the ancient Greeks, Middle Ages, to colonial and Modern experiences, we will survey different ways of knowing nature. Where did the idea of nature as “designed” come from? How did natural historians and philosophers unveil nature’s secrets? What role did scientists play in the colonial experiences? How could Modern scholars imagine “improving” the face of the Earth? These broad questions will guide us in our readings of a series of primary sources, including great and not-so-great books by Hippocrates, Plato, Aristotle, Pliny, St. Francis, Evelyn, Grew, Bacon, Linnaeus, Buffon, Jefferson, Rousseau, Malthus and Darwin, as well as largely forgotten texts by anonymous authors and colonial explorers.

Notes

Sect 002 for Environmental Studies majors.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1532 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Lives in Science

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Gene Cittadino

Syllabus

Description

What kinds of people are scientists? What can we learn by studying their lives? How, if at all, do scientific lives differ from other lives? Do scientists possess unique insights that justify their privileged position in our society? How has the relationship between scientists and society changed over time? This course explores the nature of science, its history, and its place in our culture through a selective study of the lives of scientists. Our main sources will be biographies and autobiographies: books, articles, obituaries. Emphasis will be placed on the process of the creation of scientific knowledge, the relationship between science and politics, economics, philosophy, and religion, and the dissemination and application of scientific knowledge. There will be some attention paid as well to issues involving women and minorities in the sciences, to scientific biography as a genre, and to studies of science as a profession. The cast of characters will be drawn from a variety of time periods and disciplines, from the early modern period to the very recent past, and may include Galileo, Newton, Darwin, Marie Curie, Lise Meitner, E. E. Just, James Watson, Rosalind Franklin, E. O. Wilson, Richard Feynman, and Stephen Hawking.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1855 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Creativity, Innovation, Entrepreneurship

4 units
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Peter Rajsingh

Description

The terms creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship (CI&E) have become catchphrases in the 21st century. The goal of this class is to examine these concepts both individually and in the way they interrelate. What is being invoked by these terms? To what extent are CI&E stable, contestable, or how is one a precursor of the other? A business writer suggested that “creativity is the price of admission, but it’s innovation that pays the bills.” How are CI&E values, as well as generators of value in business and in life? Do the terms complement or stand in opposition to other values, and through what practices and cultural and conceptual frames are they articulated and operationalized (such as creation  ex nihilo , zero to one, the lean start-up, methodological individualism, etc.)? Analytical thinking about CI&E, therefore, leads us down various pathways. We will explore images of the self, economic notions of the good life and of society implicit in different ways that CI&E get parsed. And we will examine the anatomy of start-ups as well as intrapreneurship — the fostering of an entrepreneurial internal culture, where the Gallatin model of individualized study might be considered a useful paradigm.

Notes

Course meets on Sunday. First class meeting will be Sunday, September 13th.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1558 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

The Travel Habit: On the Road in the Thirties

2 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Steve Hutkins

Syllabus

Description

The Great Depression turned millions of people into travelers. Many of the unemployed took to the road in search of work, preferring to give up their homes rather than their cars; others hitchhiked and rode the rails. Ironically, it was also a time for leisure travel too, and this was the era when taking a family trip on a paid vacation became a national ritual. Government and industry promoted tourism to help the economy—and to pacify the working class. But getting people to travel required a deliberate, large-scale effort. As one tourism promoter put it, “The travel habit was not born with Americans. It’s an acquired taste that must be religiously and patiently cultivated.” So the Roosevelt administration created a national travel bureau to assist the hospitality industry, poured millions of dollars into roads and highways, and put authors like Eudora Welty, Saul Bellow, and Ralph Ellison to work writing WPA travel guides. The travel theme attracted novelists like Nathaniel West and Nelson Algren, who used the journey motif in their fictions, and writer-and-photographer teams like James Agee and Walker Evans traveled to document the suffering of sharecroppers and migrant workers. This course will survey the travel writing of the 1930s and provide an introduction to the social history of travel and tourism during the period. Readings may include Steinbeck’s  The Grapes of Wrath , West’s  A Cool Million , Kromer's  Waiting for Nothing , Caldwell and Margaret Bourke-White’s  You Have Seen Their Faces , and Agee and Evans’  Let Us Now Praise Famous Men , as well as the WPA travel guides and histories of the Depression and the tourist industry.

Notes

Course meets last seven weeks only, 10/23 - 12/11.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1120 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

The Southern Table: Place, Politics, Memory, and Mythology in the Foods of the American South

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Sara Franklin

Syllabus

Description

There is perhaps no region in America as valorized and contested, romanticized and politically polarizing as the South. In contemporary American food culture, the South has come to represent a number of aesthetic ideals including authenticity, craftsmanship and the particularities of place. Many even go so far as to argue that the foods of the South make up the only “true” American cuisine. Why the South? What elements of the region’s unique history inform this contemporary mindset, and what can we learn from today’s “New Southern” table about identity, politics, history and progress? How can studying the food of the South help us understand the popular mythology of our country as a whole? In this course, we will read both scholarly and popular literature as well as watch and listen to various materials that dig into Southern food culture. We will tease apart what is so unique about the region and its pockets of vernacular cuisine, both in reality and in imagination. By putting Southern food under the magnifying glass, we will tease apart how various forms of media engage with historical and contemporary issues of race, class and gender by continually asking: Who is credited with “inventing” the cuisines of the American South? From whence do signature Southern ingredients  really  hail, and who has prepared them? How have branding, advertising, cookbooks and television massaged the Southern narrative in order to serve and perpetuate the romantic ideals of the Old South? And in today’s “New South,” who is invited to, and who is still excluded from, the Southern table, both in reality and in popular narratives? In this unique moment of Southern food’s surge in popularity, we will pen our own stories about how the South is translated and represented gastronomically in our own locale, New York City.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

FIRST-UG400 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: Portraiture and Power

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Nina Hien

Description

From Velazquez’s dazzling and enigmatic Spanish Baroque painting “Las Meninas,” which depicts the artist himself in the presence of the royal family, to the current moment when the digital “selfie” is thought to function as a gauge of cultural narcissism, this writing-intensive class will examine “the portrait” and its prominent and peculiar place as a visual and textual object in global contexts through description, formal analysis and contextualization. What forms of power and identity are portraits capable of representing and revealing? How can portraiture expose the ways that a society classifies its people, establishes its hierarchies and presents its value systems? In addition to examining portraiture as an art practice, we will explore it as a vernacular and ritual form in diverse time periods and geographical locations. We will devote some attention to the practice of street photography as well as to the formation of iconic images and the representational politics of figures including Mussolini, Che Guevara and Ho Chi Minh. We will consider what influences different and transforming media technologies have on representing people and the self. In two five-page essays and three drafts of a 10-page final essay, students will develop academic writing and rhetorical skills through an engagement with visual and textual material. Course material may include essays or works by Italo Calvino, George Simmel, Vivian Maier, Michel Foucault, Richard Brilliant, Nancy Burson, Graham Clarke, Geoffrey Batchen and James Elkins.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1560 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Introduction to Dramatic Writing: The Short Play

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Darrel Alejandro Holnes

Description

In this arts workshop we will learn the basics of playwriting by examining the work of Aristotle as well as plays by major writers including Anton Chekov, Oscar Wilde, and others. Our goal will be to develop and revise a short play through a variety of writing exercises and techniques and the study of plays in  24 Favorite One-Act Plays  and the  Best 10-Minute Plays of 2014 . This course will also feature guest lectures by a diverse group of working playwrights and theater professionals and the viewing of a Broadway and Off-Broadway show. Upon completing this course you will have a working body of short dramatic writing and learn how to submit your work to student and professional festivals and contests worldwide.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG95 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Reflexes of Romanticism

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Andrew Libby

Syllabus

Description

What is Romanticism and how, after 200 years, are the Romantics still influencing culture? This course explores the literature, art, music, and thought of the so-called "Romantic era" of Europe during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. We will examine the historical contexts that gave rise to Romantic culture and the intellectual and cultural production of the movement itself: the ways in which the Romantics retooled values associated with the Enlightenment, such as critique, reason, scientific progress, equality, and individual subjectivity, toward new aesthetic, social, and political ends. We will investigate the ways in which the Romantics privileged the imagination and enabled new considerations of liberal education and social revolution. Finally, we will read post-Romantic writers such as Nietzsche, Dickinson, and Freud, for what we will consider as their radicalized romantic reflexes. The seminar will involve discussion, experiential exercises, writing (analytical and creative), and group projects. We will employ methods and theories from an array of disciplines: philosophy, critical theory, gender/queer theory, and art history. Readings may include Rousseau, Kant, Wheatley, Schiller, Coleridge,Goethe, P. Fitzgerald, M. Wollstonecraft , M. Shelley, P. B. Shelley, Keats, and we will look at the visual art of Delacroix, Turner, Odilon Redon, Fredercik Edwin Church, Caspar David Friedrich, Goya.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1571 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Writing for Television I

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Imani Douglas

Description

This workshop will explore the process of turning an idea into a teleplay. Prior to delving into the world of television, we will take a peek into writing for stage and film. The differences and similarities of these mediums will be investigated, via such works as Neil Simon’s  The Odd Couple , successful in all forms—stage, film, and TV sitcom. Structure, function and form will be examined via the reading of scripts and viewing of films and classic TV. Students will spend ten weeks of the semester creating, developing, and writing a sitcom episode of a classic television series, such as  I Love Lucy . Students will learn first-hand what it takes to complete a writing assignment from pitch, to beat sheet, outline, first draft, rewrite, to table draft, under the direct supervision and guidance of an executive producer. In this way, students will learn the business of the TV writer and what it takes to be successful in “the room” of a Hollywood TV show. Readings may include  Writing for Television  by Madeline DiMaggio and  Laughs, Luck and Lucy!  by Jess and Gregg Oppenheimer. This course is open to students with a serious interest in the craft of writing for television. This writing-intensive workshop is modeled on the industry, requiring strict adherence to deadlines and mandatory attendance.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1751 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Biology and Society

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Myles Jackson

Syllabus

Description

Perhaps the most recent ethical challenge faced by all of us is biotechnology. This seminar explores the relationship between the biological sciences and society in the U.S. throughout the twentieth century. We will examine how debates concerning "nature versus nurture" have been framed historically. We shall discuss the history of eugenics and investigate how the U.S. government saw eugenics as proffering an objective tool for testing immigration and sterilization policies. We shall ask if there is a link between eugenics and the Human Genome Project. How has the patenting of human and plant genes reshaped the conduct of scientific research? How are molecular biology and pharmaceutical and biotech firms simultaneously challenging and reifying notions of race in the age of biocapitalism? How much of human behavior is shaped by genes, and how does that affect issues concerning free will and culpability? Is it ethical for developing countries to use genetically modified crops rather than their own sustainable practices? How has the HIV/AIDS epidemic reshaped the historical notions of the doctor-patient relationship and objectivity of drug testing? This course aims at drawing attention to the ethical, legal, and social issues generated by biology over the past century. Readings will include works from twentieth-century politicians such as Teddy Roosevelt; eugenicists, including Charles Davenport; the historian of science Dan Kevles; the philosopher of science Michael Ruse; the sociologist and historian of medicine Steven Epstein; the sociologist of race Troy Duster; and intellectual property lawyers such as Rebecca Eisenberg, as well as recent works by molecular biologists and geneticists on the definition of race, the role of patenting in biotechnology, and how commercial interests are driving scientific research.

Notes

Due to overlapping subject matter between this course and Genetics and Society (IDSEM-UG 1832), students will not receive credit for Genetics and Society if they have taken (or are taking) Biology and Society.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG413 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: Musical Subcultures

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Amanda Petrusich

Syllabus

Description

The American musical landscape is now comprised of many self-contained factions, subcultures that exist and thrive independent of mainstream culture and operate according to their own ideologies and rules. In this first-year writing seminar, we’ll consider the best ways for music journalists to define and reveal these communities on the page. What exactly defines a subculture, musical or otherwise? What happens when certain sounds are co-opted by the mainstream? As writers, how do we look past preexisting archetypes and our own presumptions regarding certain movements and their fans? Do we keep an objective distance or fully submit ourselves to the experience, participating as we document? Students will explore, study, infiltrate, and report on several musical subcultures – web-based or otherwise – of their choosing, submitting four 1,500-2,000 word essays. Readings will include Dick Hebdige, Nathan Rabin, Michaelangelo Matos, Legs McNeil, Chuck Klosterman, Joan Didion, John Jeremiah Sullivan, Jeff Chang, Kent Russell, and more.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

WRTNG-UG1039 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Writing About Popular Music

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Amanda Petrusich

Syllabus

Description

Effective music criticism—criticism that places a song or album within the appropriate social, political, personal, and aesthetic contexts—can be as enthralling and moving as the music it engages. In this course, we will explore different ways of writing about music, from the record review to the personal essay. We’ll consider the evolving tradition of pop music criticism (How are MP3 blogs and Web sites challenging print media? How is the critic’s role changing?) and the mysterious practice of translating sound into ideas (How do we train ourselves to be better and more thoughtful listeners?). Through reading, writing, and class discussion, we’ll contemplate the mysterious circuitry that causes people to embrace (or require) music—from Bob Dylan to Lil’ Wayne —and how best to explore that connection on the page. Readings will include Lester Bangs, Rob Sheffield, Carl Wilson, Sasha Frere-Jones, Robert Christgau, Ann Powers, Simon Reynolds, Chuck Klosterman, Ellen Willis, and others.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

FIRST-UG415 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: Just Food: Sustainability and Survival

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Nosheen Ali

Description

Humans have evolved over millennia, and yet it seems that the most pressing concerns of today remain connected to basic issues of survival. One such concern is that of food — our most primal need — and the way we relate to land and the environment. Are we consuming real “food” that provides nourishment or something else? Who has access to healthy food, and who gets to make decisions about how food is produced and distributed? How have our food habits and farming processes changed over time? And are we eating food or eating up the Earth? These are just some of the questions that we will carefully ponder, as we examine the relationship between food, agrarian history and sustainability from the perspective of global development studies. Students will cultivate their writing voice by working on three reflection papers and one longer, final essay, with guidance provided at each stage. The material for the course will be drawn from a variety of disciplinary approaches including history, sociology, political economy, and environmental studies. Amongst other texts, we will read selections from Wendell Berry’s  Bringing it to the Table: On Farming and Food , Vandana Shiva’s  The Violence of the Green Revolution: Third World Agriculture, Ecology, and Politics  and Deborah Barndt’s  Tangled Routes: Women, Work, and Globalization on the Tomato Trail.  The course will also feature guest lectures from farmers and sustainability thinkers who are actively pursuing a just, food order in the New York area.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1575 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Dramatizing History I

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Kristoffer Diaz

Description

How does the dramatist bring alive an historical epoch to enliven a work for stage, film or television? What elements are essential to create a compelling narrative? Should the characters be actual people or fictionalized composites? And what ethical issues are raised in such decision making? In this arts workshop students will embark on a journey to bring alive and shape stories that hold personal significance. Whether the tales are connected to family, culture, gender or ‘race’ memory, there are certain steps that may enhance the creation and development of dramatic work based on historical information. The goal, based on the student’ work, is the fully develop the outline of the story. Readings may include such texts as Aristotle’s  Poetics , Lajos Egri's  The Art of Dramatic Writing , Robert McKee's  Story  Jeffrey Sweet’s  The Dramatist’s Toolkit , and plays by Universes, Robert Schenkkan, Clifford Odets and Anna Deveare Smith, among others.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

CORE-GG2402 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Master's Thesis I

2 units

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis1.html Description: In Master’s Thesis I, students will complete the basic research for and begin drafting the thesis. The course, which is a two credit course supervised by the student’s advisor, will entail independent work, supported by the writing resources of the MA Program. Students: (1) must attend a meeting (registered students will be emailed information about place and time at the beginning of the semester) with the MA Program faculty and staff to discuss the overall goals of the course; (2) immerse themselves in the relevant scholarly discourses and literatures and begin drafting the thesis and, in the case of artistic theses, developing the artwork and accompanying research essay ; (3) meet with their advisers, on a regular basis, to consult on the content, logic, organization and methods for the thesis; (4) draw on the resources of the MA Program (e.g. individual consultations, organized peer writing groups, themed writing workshops) led by Gallatin M.A. program staff; (5) and at the end of the semester, present their work in progress by participating in a forum organized by Gallatin and attended by faculty and peers. To pass this course, in addition to fulfilling the presentation requirement, students must demonstrate significant progress toward completing the thesis. For more details, please see the additional information about Master’s Thesis I on the Gallatin website.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2401.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ELEC-GG2670 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Transnational Cinema

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Rahul Hamid

Description

Film has always been an international medium. During the silent era films were exported with title cards of different languages, so that the same images could cross linguistic borders. With the coming of sound language came to identify films more closely with their country of origin and the discourse of nationhood. As time has passed and films are increasingly funded by multiple sources from many different nations and regions a new conception of transnational cinema has emerged. In this course we will try to understand the many forms that transnational cinema takes, ranging from huge mass market co-productions to small art films designed for the International festival circuit. We will try to answer such questions as how do these films express national identity both politically and stylistically? How do transnational aesthetics interact with the idea of the  auteur  and with national identity? The course will examine various examples of transnational cinema originating in India, Senegal, Hong Kong, and the European Union. Students will engage with theorizations of the Transnational, as well as post colonial theory, conceptions of third cinema, and genre theory.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1609 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
FA 2015

Dante's World

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Antonio Rutigliano

Syllabus

Description

This course will explore the social, political, intellectual and religious evolution of the late medieval dantesque world, by focusing on Dante’s  Divine Comedy . A close reading of  The Divine Comedy  will serve as a forum to discuss and analyze Dante's writings and those important works that helped to shape the thirteenth-century Florentine society that ultimately served as a stepping stone for the humanist movement that paved the way for the Italian Renaissance. But Dante’s  Divine Comedy  is not just a text of and for its own time. It has left readers fascinated and shuddering for over 700 years because its poetical and literary tropes enable them to confront their experience of the human condition and transform what and how they desire. During the class, therefore, students will conduct research projects on more historical and more enduring aspects of Dante’s Commedia. As well, field trips to museums, cinematic recreations, documentaries, music and other visual and auditory aids will be used to enrich our sense of the text’s meaning and context. Readings include:  The Divine Comedy, The Confessions, The Consolation of Philosophy, The Aeneid , and  The Book of the Zohar. 

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1552 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

Sociology of Religion: Islam and the Modern World

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Ali Mirsepassi

Syllabus

Description

This course is designed to explore the role of religion in modern societies. We will examine religion as an important social institution and also as a cultural system. We will study canonical and contemporary theories of religion. The focus of the course, however, will be Islam. We will look at the cultural context and historical construction of Islam, as well as the different social contexts within which Islam has evolved. We will examine the relationship between Islam and modernity, including secular ideologies, gender politics, and modern democracy. We will pay particular attention to the role that Islam plays in the everyday life of those who practice it, who are affected by it, or who struggle with it as their tradition. Our goal is to study Islam not as a fixed object or authentic tradition but as a social and cultural phenomenon subject to change, contestation, and critique. Texts may include Mernissi,  Islam and Democracy;  Arkoun,  Re-Thinking Islam ; Fernea,  In Search of Islamic Feminism ; and Armstrong,  Islam .

Notes

Same as MEIS-UA 785 001.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1847 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Dangerous and Intermingled: An Intensive Introduction to Critical Research Practices

8 units Fri
12:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Jack Tchen

Syllabus

Description

This course provides a foundation for critical, cross-cultural urban research methodologies, and challenges students to develop interdisciplinary, problem-focused analytic skills and insights by rethinking what we know about New York City. In the world of fundamentalists, intermingled New York has represented and still represents the epitome of danger and evil about the American experiment—the public mixture of classes, genders, races, sexualities, spiritualisms, and the-devil-knows-what-else!#? As elite Protestants created a refined European-affected "high brow" culture, they also created myriad "others." This intensive course will examine the historical formation of both sides of this false yet formative binary by walking Manhattan (and Red Hook) to get a grounded understanding of the way spaces have been built, ignored, and rebuilt over time. Course materials will include: Sanderson's Mannahatta maps, Burn's documentary "New York – a documentary" (1999), Smith's  Decolonizing Methodologies  (2006), and a course reader. Intensive dialogue-driven seminar approach. Walking shoes and passion for NYC prerequisites!

Notes

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors only. This course is recommended for students who wish to conduct advanced, independent, research as part of their subsequent studies. It combines the course sequence Dangerous and Intermingled I (WASP New York) and II (Subaltern New York), previously taught as IDSEM 1666 and 1667, respectively; students who have taken IDSEM 1666 and/or 1667 may not take this course for credit.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG83 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Human Rights, Human Wrongs

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Vasuki Nesiah

Syllabus

Description

What are human rights? This course will provide an introduction to the different ways people have thought about the political, ethical and legal foundation for rights claims. It will also look at the world of human rights activism and how different organizations and social movements have used human rights discourse to fight for a wide range of issues, such as women’s rights, access to housing and redress for war crimes. We will explore human rights through the work of philosophers, lawyers, journalists, activists and film directors. Readings will be wide ranging and include Karl Marx, Immananuel Kant, Charles Taylor, Martha Nussabum, Philip Alston, Makau Mutau, Katherine Franke, Mahmud Mamdani, Ken Roth, Teju Cole and others. We will also read and analyze international human rights instruments. We will also watch films such as War Don Don (Rebecca Richman Cohen’s film on post-conflict human rights prosecutions in Sierra Leone) and The Pinochet Case (Patricio Guzman’s film tracking accountability for human rights violations during Chile’s military regime).

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1802 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Hearing Difference: The Commercial Music Industry and the American Racial Imaginary

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Kwami Coleman

Syllabus

Description

In 1903, at the dawn of the commercial music industry, sociologist W. E. B. DuBois famously proclaimed that the foremost problem in twentieth century American society is “the problem of the color line.” Du Bois’s prescience sets the stage for this course’s exploration of racial identity in recorded, commercially available music. We will examine how racial performance has intermingled with music consumption in the United States since blackface minstrelsy in the 1830s. Our goal is to understand how deeply embedded race—both ascribed and claimed—is in American music culture, reverberating throughout the last century in debates on artists’ authenticity, propriety, and popularity. This course is organized chronologically; each week is devoted to a particular era and its corresponding musical genres leading up to the present. With the rising importance of visual media since the mid-20th century, a historically informed understanding of the confluences of race and ethnicity in American music culture through music media and technologies will offer an enhanced understanding of the past and our contemporary, internet-driven musical landscape.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9501 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

SYDNEY: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-SYDNEY. This course consists of an agency-based internship and a campus-based seminar at the academic center that allows students to integrate theory and practice skills gained from academic course work with authentic fieldwork experiences. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

INDIV-UG1701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail Only. Deadline for submitting proposal is Sept 8. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1454 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
FA 2015

The Iliad and its Legacies in Drama

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Laura Slatkin

Syllabus

Description

"The poem of force," according to Simone Weil, the  Iliad  is also a poem of forceful influence. In this course we will read the  Iliad  intensively, followed by an examination of its heritage on the dramatic stage. In the first half of the semester we will primarily explore the  Iliad  in terms of the poetics of traditionality; the political economy of epic; the ideologics of the   Männerbund  (the "band of fighting brothers"); the  Iliad 's uses of reciprocity; its construction of gender; its intimations of tragedy. In the second half of the course, informed by a reading of Aristotle's  Poetics , we will focus on responses to the  Iliad  in dramatic form; possible readings will include Sophocles'  Ajax ; Euripides'  Iphigeneia in Aulis ; Shakespeare's   Troilus and Cressida ; Racine's   Andromaque ; Giraudoux's  La guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu;  Ellen McLaughlin's   Iphigenia and Other Daughters.  Students will give presentations on an Iliadic intertext of their own choosing.

Notes

Same as COLIT-UA 972.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1838 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
FA 2015

Narrating Seduction: The Tale of Genji

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Nina Cornyetz

Syllabus

Description

Written in the eleventh century by a noble lady of the Japanese court, the Tale of Genji has been called the world’s first novel, and even the world’s first psychological novel. But can we really use the terms “novel” and “psychological” to describe the narrative? In this course we will carefully and closely read  The Tale of Genji  alongside selected secondary sources to focus our attention on such topics as: narration, visuality, sexual politics, relation to reality, poetics, and aesthetics in the text.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1618 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Media and Fashion

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Moya Luckett

Syllabus

Description

This course will examine the roles fashion plays in film, television and digital media and their cultural and economic significance. As a signifying system in its own right, fashion contributes to the semiotics of popular forms. It can also operate as a means of authentication (especially in period films and TV) or reveal a variety of ways in which media plays with space and time, purposeful or not. Besides evoking specific temporalities and narrative tone, fashion plays an important role in the construction of gender, both in terms of representation and address. This course will examine the history of the intersection of the fashion and media industries from the free distribution of film-related dress patterns in movie theaters of the 1910s to the current trend for make-over TV, networks like the Style network, the increasing proliferation of fashion blogs and the construction of specifically feminine video games. How does fashion’s specific configuration of consumerism, signification and visual pleasure lend itself to the articulation of modern/postmodern cultures and their presentation of the self? Texts will include Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Church Gibson,  Fashion Cultures: Theories, Explanations and Analysis ; selections from Roland Barthes,  The Fashion System ; Elizabeth Wilson,  Adorned in Dreams: Fashion and Modernity ; assorted articles and selected clips from films and television shows including  Marie Antoinette ,  What Not To Wear ,  The New York Hat, Fashions of 1934, Now, Voyager  and  Sex and the City .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1835 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

The Poetics and Politics of Mourning

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Sinan Antoon

Description

If “the past is never dead,” as Faulkner wrote, how does it continue to live on? How do its ghosts continue to haunt the political present? Can these ghosts be exorcised or does one have to learn to live with them? These questions become especially urgent and consequential in the aftermath of war and catastrophe, as writers and artists confront the legacy of violence and try to memorialize annihilated bodies and spaces. The aesthetic modes they choose to address both the dead and the living and the ways in which they narrate the past have political consequences for the future. We will explore and try to answer these questions by reading a selection of texts (fiction, poetry, film, and visual art) as sites and acts of mourning. Our main focus will be on Iraq, but we will also read works from and about Armenia, Palestine, Lebanon, and the US. Readings will include Benjamin, Boulus, Butler, Darwish, Derrida, Freud, Khoury, Morrison, and Youssef.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1606 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

The Search for Cinematic Storytelling Identity

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM Thu
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Pedro Cristiani

Syllabus

Description

This arts workshop explores the question of identity through the cinematic expressions of different cultures, while guiding the participants to create and develop their own visual storytelling journey. Students will be introduced to the practical stages of an independent digital production, and will generate, as a final project for the course, a one-minute short film that represents their unique storytelling identity, translating their personal point of view into a coherent narrative experience. These narrative tools will emerge from the first part of the course, which focuses on the analysis of short and feature film productions from Asian, European, and Latin American directors. In considering these global examples, we will study the approach to storytelling through the influences of texts of faith, and social and cultural identities. In-class screenings will include In the Mood for Love [2000, Wong Kar Wai, Honk Kong], Padre Padrone [1977, Paolo e Vittorio Taviani, Italy] , Wings of Desire [1987, Wim Wenders, Germany], Moebius [1997, Gustavo Mosquera, Argentina], Amores Perros [2000, Alejandro Iñarritú, Mexico], Talk to Her [2002, Pedro Almodóvar, Spain], Le fabuleux destin d'Amélie Poulain [2001, Jean-Pierre Jeunet, France], The Descendants [2011, Alexander Payne, USA], and Stoker [2013, Chan-Wook Park, USA]. For more details, please visit the course website: https://wp.nyu.edu/storytellingid/

Notes

Please note this course includes an additional, required meeting hour (Thu, 6:20-7:35) for weekly film screenings.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG9150 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

BUENOS AIRES: Art and Politics in the City: New York and Buenos Aires

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. This course brings together students in New York and Buenos Aires to examine how urban arts and politics intersect in the Americas. Two sections, one in each city, will meet and collaborate simultaneously via internet to address several key questions: How are art and politics understood and expressed differently and similarly in these two American metropolises and why? How do shared aesthetic features of public art reflect the global circulation of urban creative modes? What do we learn about local politics from looking at the art and writing on a city’s public spaces? Teams of students in both cities will conduct field work in selected neighborhoods to help create an archive of murals, graffiti, performances, and installations. Then, drawing from readings in history, art criticism, and urban studies, as well as from census and electoral data and using GIS technology, we will analyze how social and political processes like gentrification, inequality, and planning generate and reflect creative political expression as captured in our database, culminating in transnational, collaborative projects that explore what wisdom and truths America's streets continue to reveal, 500 years after conquest. *THIS COURSE IS TENTATIVE.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1649 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

The Music of Poetry and the Poetry of Music

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Lisa Goldfarb

Syllabus

Description

Although the ancient Greeks used the word “moûsike” to designate both poetry and music and the two were once “one” art, with alphabetic writing their paths diverged and poetry, music, rhetoric, and musical theory became distinct from one another. Yet, however much music and poetry may have their separate histories and technical languages, poets and composers have continued to probe the relation between the two arts. In this course, we will focus on the relationship between music and poetry in the modern era—from the “fin de siècle” and Verlaine’s call to the symbolist poets to compose “Music above everything,” to the modernists in English and American poetry and the jazz improvisations of the twentieth century. We will study musical and poetic history of the period, grapple with what we mean when we say a poem is musical and what melody means in poetry, and we will study how to define and discuss lyricism in music. Readings may include the work of modern poets (symbolists, imagists, modernists)—Mallarmé, Verlaine, Valéry, Pound, Auden, Mina Loy, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Stevens —and modern composers Debussy, Stravinsky, Copland, Ives, Thomson and the rhythms of blues and jazz. To develop a critical vocabulary, readings may also include texts on the history and theory of both arts (Winn, Bucknell, Kramer, Hollander, Meyer, Adorno).

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CLI-UG1460 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Literacy in Action

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Dianne Ramdeholl

Syllabus

Description

This course combines volunteer work in New York City adult literacy and English as a second language programs with an academic introduction to the philosophy, history, and current issues of adult literacy. An important emphasis of the class is to critically examine adult literacy through a social justice lens. Students work as volunteer teachers of reading and writing oral English or mentors at such institutions as the University Settlement, International Rescue Committee, Turning Point, and Fortune Society. In class they read about and discuss such key issues as adult literacy education policy and the impact on the field - including instruction, implications of being marginalized by educational systems, instructional approaches developed for adults; and the steps that might be taken to build support for high-quality, adult basic-skills programs. Throughout the course, students relate such issues to their own on-site experiences in class discussion and role-playing, and create a portfolio of writing that includes on-site observations, lesson plans, reflections, and a final analytical paper. Readings may include  Making Meaning, Making Change  (Auerbach);  We Make the Road by Walking  (Horton and Freire);  Pedagogy of the Oppressed  (Freire), as well as other articles and journals ( Focus on Basics and The Change Agent ).

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

FIRST-UG353 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: The Faith Between Us

4 units Mon Wed
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
Scott Korb

Syllabus

Description

Look at the headlines, flip through a magazine, or click the link to your favorite blog, and increasingly you’ll find that whether faith comes between us, separating one believer from another, or lives between us, forming the glue that holds communities together, is a question we all must face. Through a consideration of a variety of contemporary religion writing—mostly from newspapers, popular magazines, journals, and Web sites—this course will ask students to take their own excursions into faith and faithlessness, and through a process of writing, workshopping, and the all-important rewriting, create the stories that, in Joan Didion’s words, “we tell ourselves in order to live.” Readings may include works by Jeff Sharlet and Karen Armstrong, Paul Elie and Marilynne Robinson, Peter Manseau and Matthew Teague, Christopher Hitchens and John Jeremiah Sullivan.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1801 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Minds and Bodies: A History of Neuroscience

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Brendan Matz

Syllabus

Description

This course examines the history of the sciences of the mind and brain from the end of the eighteenth century to the present. Ranging from mesmerism and phrenology to physiology, genetics, and neuroscience, it will consider the development over time of knowledge about the brain and its relationship to the body. The course will also analyze the ways in which this knowledge has been applied in medicine, law, economics, government policy, and religion. Some of the topics we will look at include the following: mind-body dualism, neuron theory, psychoanalysis and biology, brain imaging, the molecular and plastic brain, and psychotropic drugs. The course takes a primarily historical approach to this topic, but work from other academic disciplines that engage with related questions will also be addressed. The last third of the course will focus on recent history and contemporary issues surrounding the “century of the brain.” One of our challenges will be to examine what history and science and technology studies more broadly might contribute to ongoing conversations about minds and bodies. Texts we will consider include Ann Fabian's  The Skull Collectors  and Ray Kurzweil's  How to Create a Mind .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1834 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Wisdom for Life: Cultivating Self, Philosophy, and Society

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Bradley Lewis

Syllabus

Description

We live in a time of tremendous challenges: climate change, inequality, financial hardship, conflict, risk, rising mental illness and life style disease, and declining happiness and well being. These challenges signal the need for social and political change, but increasingly they also signal the need for personal and interpersonal change. Echoing a range of contemporary thinkers, cultural and environmental historian Thomas Berry has called the task of bringing the personal and political together the “Great Work.” This is the task of giving shape and meaning to our lives by relating personal stories to larger metanarratives of nature and culture. This course explores this idea. What does it mean to see today’s overarching challenges as opportunity for creatively reimagining ourselves and the stories we tell about ourselves? What kinds of guidance could we get from philosophical, religious, and aesthetic traditions to develop visions for human life in harmony with itself and with nature? And, perhaps most important, how might we develop personal and political strategies for putting these visions into practice for ourselves and our community?

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1061 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Literary Forms and the Craft of Criticism

4 units Wed
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Sharon Friedman

Description

This seminar focuses on the study of literature and literary criticism. Through close reading of a range of literary forms, including short stories, novels, plays, and narrative essays, we identify the conventions that characterize each genre (including the blurring of genres) and that invite various strategies of reading. In addition to the formal analysis of each work, we will consider theoretical approaches to literature—for example, new historicism, postcolonial studies, feminist and gender analysis, and psychoanalytic criticism—that draw on questions and concepts from other disciplines. Attention will be given to the transaction between the reader and the text. The aims of the course are to encourage students to make meaning of literary works and to hone their skills in written interpretation. Authors may include Poe, Melville, Chekhov, Hawthorne, Bellow, Beckett, Baldwin, Woolf, Morrison, Conrad, Gordimer, Achebe, Kincaid, and Erdrich.

Notes

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9351 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

PARIS: Topics in French Literature: Paris in French and Expatriate Literature

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PARIS. In this course, we will explore the ways in which Paris plays a role in the representation of the subject. Through the study of novels and autobiographies by Breton, Hemingway, Stein, Duras, Modiano, de Beauvoir, and Baldwin, we will ask, what is the role of place in the imagining or invention of the self? How does the experience of a specific city, Paris, influence the formation of identity? How do these authors represent, or subvert, the notion of the ‘real’? Although the focus of this course is literary, we will also engage with major political, cultural, and artistic movements of the period, exploring the ways in which our writers negotiate history through their writings. Conducted in English.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9350 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

PARIS: Paris Monuments and Political Power in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PARIS. This course examines aspects of political and social change in France from the end of the French Revolution to the present day. Through an exploration of Paris neighborhoods, monuments and museums, we will look at how the city’s evolution has been inscribed on the urban landscape, and reflect on how history and national identity are imagined, produced and contested through the carving up of urban space. Major dates and events of French political history form the chronological backbone for this course, while class discussions are organized thematically from the perspective of social history and the history of ideas. Classes include walking tours and site visits in and around Paris. Conducted in English.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG807 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Transfer Student Research Seminar: Popular Religion and Popular Culture in North America

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Gregory Erickson

Syllabus

Description

American religion, historian Nathan Hatch writes, has “less to do with the specifics of polity and governance and more with the incarnation of the church into popular culture.” Although Hatch was writing about the 19th century, this complex relationship between the popular and the liturgical continues to shape and define America today. In this course, we study and write about ways in which film, television, advertising, music, sports, politics, and the news media present, negotiate, and affect religious issues, and, conversely, how religion changes popular culture. We “read” primary texts of popular religion and popular culture, such as Billy Graham sermons, Mormon pageants, Madonna videos, baseball and video games, as well as theoretical works by Jean Baudrillard, Elaine Graham, Peter Williams, Kate McCarthy, Eric Mazur, Susan Mizruchi, Richard Santana and Gregory Erickson. Students are encouraged to explore topics of their own interest, and assignments include reaction papers, various essay forms, and individual research projects.

Notes

Open to Gallatin transfer students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Transfer Student Research Seminar (FIRST-UG)

WRTNG-UG1230 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Writing Cross-Culturally

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Nancy Agabian

Syllabus

Description

In this course, students will create writing that traverses identities, borders and cultures, as well as genres, as they explore and deepen their understanding of issues of form, craft and ethics. The class will read and discuss a variety of texts that center around various modes of culture crossing, such as travel, tourism, and study abroad; immigration, expatriation and repatriation; and historical clashes and conflicts. Through an ongoing examination of structural and craft issues in the exemplary texts, students will make creative decisions to help write three main assignments dealing with themes of Memory, Identity and Conflict. We'll use our discussions of Memory to help focus on expository and reflective rhetorical strategies, Identity as a way to experiment with point of view and character development, and Conflict as a method for exploring structure and dramatic tension. In order to write cross-culturally about personal experiences, students will be encouraged to create texts along the spectrum between creative nonfiction and autobigraphical fiction. Theoretical essays will help inform how we ethically position ourselves as writers observing cultures not (necessarily) our own in order to inform audiences and to challenge our own prejudices. Through it all, we'll consider how formal experiments across genres may help illuminate experiences and confront perceptions. Authors to be read include Gloria Anzaldua, Staceyann Chin, Edwidge Danticat, Junot Diaz, Randa Jarrar, V.S. Naipaul, Mary Louise Pratt, Salman Rushdie, Edward Said, Marjane Satrapi, Amy Tan, and Le Thi Diem Thuy.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

FIRST-UG804 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Transfer Student Research Seminar: Identity and the Cultural Construction of Race and Ethnicity

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Laurie Woodard

Syllabus

Description

Identity: the ways in which we see our selves; the ways in which others see us; the dynamic relationship between these two seemingly distinct and often irreconcilable poles is the underlying theme of first-year research seminar. We focus specifically on the ways in we create, build, rebuild, and live our identities in constant dialogue with contemporary American societal constructions of race and ethnicity. Questions we explore include: what is race? Is it immutable? How do we know it when we see it? How is it distinct from ethnicity? What is gained and/or lost by considering or not considering race today? In what ways do other facets of identity, for example gender, sexuality, and class inform, challenge, reconstruct, or deconstruct our racial identities? Several short written assignments help students formulate, research, and respond to questions about identity and race and ethnicity in a longer final research paper. Texts include fiction, nonfiction, plays, and film. The reading list is not set, but will likely include Dael Orlandersmith's  Yellowman , Tony Kushner's  Angels in America , Edward Said’s  Orientalism , and David Henry Hwang's  M. Butterfly. 

Notes

Open to Gallatin transfer students only. Permission required. To register, please contact Gallatin’s Transfer Student Class Adviser, Joshua Shirkey (joshua.shirkey@nyu.edu).

Type

First-Year Program: Transfer Student Research Seminar (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1731 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Gender Undone: Fiction, Film, and Feminist Theory

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Meghan Fox

Description

Is gender something one has or something one does? What does it mean to “do” a feminist reading of a text or a film? How might feminist theory endeavor to both describe and undo cultural constructions of gender? This course will explore these questions by reading a range of theoretical and literary texts that elaborate historical, medical, psychoanalytic, and cultural models of gender and sexuality. We will read critics and theorists who have become central to contemporary feminism, including Freud, Foucault, Butler, Halberstam, Ahmed, and Fausto-Sterling, among others. We will pay particular attention to literary texts that have been productive for feminist and queer formulations of gender, including work by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Gloria Anzaldúa, Nella Larsen, James Baldwin, and Alison Bechdel. Finally, we will screen several films that invite viewers to reform or rethink their own perceptions of gender, including  Orlando, Southern Comfort , and  Paris is Burning . Topics we will discuss include gender norms, the psychosomatic, the gaze, transgender theory, and performativity.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1193 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Culture as Communication

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Vasu Varadhan

Syllabus

Description

This course examines the concept of culture through its forms of communication. The shift from orality to literacy to electronic media and now digital media has important consequences for the social, political, and economic structures within a culture. If we take as axiomatic that every culture wishes to preserve itself through its forms of communication, we then need to ask ourselves which forms of communication are best suited for this purpose. What happens to cultures when traditional forms of communication are forced to compete with the newer technologies? What do we mean by “knowledge” in the age of information? The impact of written narrative on orality will be discussed as well as the changes brought about by the invention of the printing press. We will examine the development of electronic media, including the newer technologies such as the Internet, and analyze their effects on individual and cultural levels. Readings may include Plato’s  Phaedrus , Ong’s  Orality and Literacy , Achebe’s  Things Fall Apart , McLuhan’s  Understanding Media , and Carr's  The Shallows . There will also be selected handouts on the impact of social media in the political, social and economic spheres.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG403 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: Abundance: Thinking, Writing, and Creating In The Age of Plenty

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Trevor Laurence Jockims

Description

Every three minutes Americans take more photographs than the entire 19th century produced. We have some 100 000 words of text pass through our eyes and ears each day (that’s ¼ of  War and Peace ). We live with an abundance of information, choices, opportunities, products, texts, and images. Even the city we live in is bursting at the seams. But what is abundance and how do we navigate it ethically, socially, and artistically? This course investigates the history and changing shape of ideas about abundance, from sonnet writing in the Renaissance to twitter feeds today, from Augmented Reality poems and the Digital Humanities to consumerism, overcrowding, and artistic repurposing. Writers we will consider include Kenneth Goldsmith, David Foster Wallace, Karl Ove Knausgaard, Marjorie Perloff, and Walter Benjamin. Photography projects will include Penelope Umbrico’s  Flickr Sunsets , Brandon Stanton’s  Humans of New York , and Walker Evans’s  Many Were Called ; Music by Glenn Gould, Sonic Youth, and Jay-Z; Films by Richard Linklater, Sarah Polly, and Bela Tarr. As we examine these materials we will also consider the changing shape of the traditional college essay and how to navigate abundance in our own writing. Students will write three short papers and a final critical essay.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1045 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Oral History, Cultural Identity and the Arts

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Judith Sloan

Description

Oral history is a complex process in the creation of artistic projects across the disciplines: documentary film, theatre, book arts, exhibitions, interactive websites, public radio, etc. This course offers training in interviewing and editing techniques, and looks at the impact of “truth-telling” on the people we interview, their families and friends, ourselves and the culture at large. Research explores the ways artistic projects informed by oral history have impacted popular culture. Readings, listening to public radio documentaries, and viewing films will be used to address the balance in accurately reflecting the realities and integrity of the people represented while staying true to the vision of the artist. Readings include (but are not limited to): Art Spiegelman’s  Maus I & II ; works by Studs Terkel including  Working ; Greg Halpern’s  Harvard Works Because We Do , listening to audio and reading slave narratives from  Remembering Slavery  project, Smithsonian;  Crossing the BLVD , Lehrer/Sloan; Anna Deveare Smith, and Dave Isay. For final projects students create collaborative or solo work in the discipline of their own training; theatre, artist books, photography, poetry, music, radio, audio art, film or video.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

SASEM-UG9250 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

LONDON: Seeing London's Architecture

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. London, like New York is a rich and complicated city. Unlike New York however, it has been continuously occupied for just under 2000 years. Almost every epoch of London’s history can be detected in the city’s architecture and distinctive streetscape. This course is designed to work in three ways. Firstly it is an opportunity to learn about London’s architecture and art by physically exploring it. Secondly this class is an introduction to sketching and keeping a travel notebook, a basic and useful skill that any liberal arts student should have an experience of. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, this course teaches how to 'read' a town or city. The ability to visually make sense of European built-environment should really help in understanding the architecture of New York City and, of course, town and cities throughout the United States, and anywhere else.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1655 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Innovations in Art Publications

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Lise Friedman

Syllabus

Description

The ever-inventive world of arts publications encompasses a dazzling range of subjects, mediums, and materials: from ancient illuminated manuscripts, political manifestos, and one-of-a-kind artists books to handmade zines, high-end glossies, poster and print multiples, CD and DVD covers, and the infinitely reproducible pages of the internet. This workshop will introduce and explore many of these forms through guest lecturers, field trips to specialized collections and museums, directed readings, and hands-on work, which will culminate in final group and individual projects. Readings may include  New Master's of Poster Design: Poster Design for the Next Century ,  A History of Illuminated Manuscripts ,  Stylepedia: A Guide to Graphic Design Mannerisms, Quirks, and Conceits,  and  The Printed Picture .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1839 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Freud

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Eve Meltzer

Description

This course aims to give students an in-depth understanding of the fundamental concepts, vocabulary and theories of Sigmund Freud, the so-called “Father of Psychoanalysis.”’ We will read closely a wide range of texts by Freud, covering the earliest incarnations of Freudian psychoanalysis to its final formulations, including concepts of the subject, drive theory, the “talking cure,” transference, dream interpretation, and more. Our sights will also be set on the ways in which psychoanalytic thought has, from its very beginnings, been in fruitful dialogue with the humanities, broadly speaking—most specifically, literature, philosophy, and the arts, although we will also consider its relevance as a clinical practice. Texts will include: Studies on Hysteria, The Interpretation of Dreams, Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality, Beyond the Pleasure Principle, Totem and Taboo, The Ego and the Id, On the History of the Psychoanalytic Movement, Leonardo da Vinci and a Memory of His Childhood, and a selection of his shorter papers.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1357 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
FA 2015

The Qur'an

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Sinan Antoon

Description

The political upheavals and events of recent years have focused much attention on “Islam” and its cultures and texts, especially the Qur’an. Most of the attention and interest in the Qur’an, however, has been reductive and superficial, amounting to no more than de-contextualized misreadings of certain verses in most cases. This seminar will serve as an introduction to the Qur’an as scripture, but also as a generative and polyphonic cultural text. We will start with a brief look at the legacy of Qur’anic studies within the larger paradigm of Orientalist scholarship and “Western” approaches to all things Islamic. We will, then, address the historical and cultural background and context of the Qur’an’s genesis as an oral revelation, its intimate affinities with Biblical and Near Eastern narratives, and its transformation into a written and canonized text after the death of Muhammad. We will then examine the Qur’an’s structure as a “book” and read selections from its most famous chapters and explore how they were deployed in various discourses as Islam became the official religion of a civilization and an empire. Readings and discussions will focus on the themes of prophecy, gender and sexuality, violence and peace. The seminar neither assumes nor requires any prior knowledge of Islamic studies or Arabic.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1209 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

The Art of Choreography

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Kathryn Posin

Syllabus

Description

It was the modern dance choreographer Martha Graham who said, “We are all born with genius. It’s just that most people lose it in the first five minutes.” This class helps the student get back his or her original choreographic ability. We will study the elements of dance—time, space and energy—and, each week, explore a different aspect of the choreographic process. The students, through improvisations and short movement studies, will discover their movement vocabulary. Each dancemaker will find their own individual choreographic voice while being introduced to some of the major twentieth century choreographers. By nature we are all dancers, with or without years of training. Choreographic process, whether one wishes to be a choreographer or not, is a superb model for thinking, assembling and creating. A digital media component teaches students to incorporate video into their work. The final performance is in a theatrical setting with lights, simple costume and possibly video. Readings will include  What is Dance?  by Roger Copeland and Marshall Cohen (eds.),  The Art of Making Dances  by Doris Humphrey,  The Intimate Act of Choreography  by Blom and Chaplin, and  Space Harmony  by Rudolph Laban. To view a clip of the final performance from last year, visit YouTube, The Art of Choreography.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

WRTNG-UG1044 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Criticism's Possible Futures

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Ben Ratliff

Syllabus

Description

Cultural criticism, first, is an impulse: taking the full measure of what’s before you. Then it is a method: looking at what’s underneath the subject, how it connects with what else you know, questioning assumptions and received wisdom. But it is not a form or style. In this course you’ll focus on the ways that criticism can go (and has long gone) beyond the classical review or argumentative-essay model, and toward other modes: philosophy; memoir; journalism; poetry; link-oriented blog post; biography or eulogy of a person, thing, place, or idea; interrogative or satirical exercise. Readings may include Oscar Wilde, Rebecca Solnit, Dave Hickey, Hilton Als, George Orwell, Terry Castle, and Anne Carson. Written work consists of one essay exploring your attraction to and/or frustration with the way you see general-audience criticism; two essays responding to syllabus readings; and two more on original topics.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

WRTNG-UG9501 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

SYDNEY: Creative Writing

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-SYDNEY. In this creative writing class students will produce work informed by their experiences of exploring, learning about, and being in Sydney. Students are encouraged to contemplate how a sense of place can be conveyed through writing, and to consider the palimpsestic environments (natural, urban, cultural, historical etc.) they interact with and within. Students will engage with a diverse range of readings, identifying their technical elements and discussing their affective poetics to learn how to ‘read as a writer’. Students shall workshop their works-in-progress during the course, learning how to effectively communicate critical feedback and how to be receptive to constructive critique during the drafting process. At the end of the course students will have the opportunity to collectively self-publish their work as a physical zine and/or an online blog.

Type

Global Programs (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1504 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Guilty Subjects: Guilt in Literature, Law and Psychoanalysis

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Sara Murphy

Syllabus

Description

This seminar will explore guilt as the link between the three broad disciplinary arenas of our title. Literary works from ancient tragedy to the modern novel thematize guilt in various ways. Freud places it at the center of his practice and his theory of mind. While law seems reliant mainly upon a formal attribution of guilt in order to determine who gets punished and to what degree, we might also suggest it relies upon “guilty subjects” for its operation. With all of these different deployments of the concept, we might agree it is a central one, yet how to define it remains a substantial question. Is the prominence of guilt in modern Western culture a vestige of a now-lost religious world? Is it, as Nietzsche suggests, an effect of “the most profound change man ever experienced when he finally found himself enclosed within the wall of society and of peace?” Freud seems to concur when he argues that guilt must be understood as a kind of internal self-division where aggressivity is turned against the self. Is guilt a pointless self-punishment, meant to discipline us? Or does it continue to have an important relation to the ethical? Readings may include Freud, Nietzsche, Foucault, Slavoj Zizek, Toni Morrison, Ursula LeGuin, W.G. Sebald, and some case law, among others.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1560 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

The Art and Craft of Poetry

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Emily Fragos

Syllabus

Description

In this workshop poets will focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer’s process. A weekly reading of a poem by each poet in the circle will serve as point of departure for discussion of the relationships of craft and expression. Each student will also briefly present a favorite poet/poem for the enjoyment and learning of the class. A final portfolio of poems is required at the end of the course.

Notes

Students may take "The Art and Craft of Poetry" two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

CORE-GG2028 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Proseminar: Theory and Methods in the Humanities: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Karen Hornick

Syllabus

Description

This seminar, designed for incoming M.A. students, provides a broad introduction to theories and methods that have shaped research in the humanities. We will read and analyze classic and modern works in fields ranging from philosophy and religion to literature and visual art, representative literary and dramatic works as well as works of theory and historiography. Early weeks of the course will be organized around texts and images representative of the major historical periods used to organize Western humanities research—the ancient world, the early modern period (“Renaissance”), and Enlightenment and Modernity. After that initial period, the syllabus will focus on major questions, themes, methods, and terms that recur frequently in contemporary humanities research: language, value and taste, form and content, interpretation and criticism, close reading, the uses of history, theorizing, cross-cultural influence and exchange, and the relationship between the disciplines of the humanities and those of the social sciences. In the last phase of the semester, we will apply everything discussed so far to a number of readings representative of the “big” preoccupations of the moment. Students in the class will have a strong voice in determining what those issues are, but they might include the study of affect, cross-cultural exchange in the globalized present, the humanities in modern education and public policy, post-humanism, or the digital humanities. In addition to short response postings and a midterm paper, students will conduct a research / critical project on a relevant topic of their own choosing that will culminate in a 15 – 20 page final paper. Guest lectures by Gallatin faculty will introduce students to a range of methodologies and interdisciplinary research frameworks.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1387 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

The Photographic Imaginary

4 units Wed
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Eve Meltzer

Description

In this seminar we will examine some of the most provocative ways in which photography has been imagined and practiced over the past century and a half, from early accounts of the daguerreotype to recent work on the digital image. Through close examination of photographic practices and works, as well as the critical discourses that have grown up around them, we will endeavor to understand not just what André Bazin calls the “ontology” of the photographic image, but also how the photograph gets thought about, talked about, utilized and, in turn, produced fantasmatically as a particular kind of object and a special way of picturing. Readings may include Barthes, Batchen, Bazin, Benjamin, Fox Talbot, Kracauer, Marcuse, Metz, Silverman,Sontag, Tagg, Wall.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1445 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Walls of Power: Public Art

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Terence Culver

Syllabus

Description

This workshop will explore how visual art, performance art, and activist art in the public sphere contribute to political dialogue and community building. The course will integrate the hands-on practice of public art making with the study of politics, community building, culture, and social issues as they relate to public art, with a special focus on New York City. A major component of the course will be a public art project that students will plan and execute during the semester. Selected readings will include: Bachelard,  The Poetics of Space ; Deutsche,  Evictions: Art and Spatial Politics ; Lacy, ed.,  Mapping the Terrain: New Genre Public Art ; Malraux,  Museum Without Walls ; Raven,  Art in the Public Interest ; Rochfort,  Mexican Muralists: Orozco, Rivera, Siqueiros .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

CORE-GG2025 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Proseminar: Theory and Methods in the Social Sciences: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Ritty Lukose

Syllabus

Description

This seminar, designed for incoming M.A. students, provides a broad introduction to theories and methods that have shaped the interdisciplinary terrain of the social sciences. The course emphasizes the reading of classic and more contemporary works of social theory and methodology, with a focus on key concepts and thinkers. How does one define a society? What is culture? How have social and cultural processes been understood? What is the relationship between a society or culture and a social group, an institution, or an individual? What is the nature of power, difference and identity? How do such foundational questions generate theories of modernity, capitalism, nationalism and globalization? How do such foundational questions orient the variety of disciplines within the social sciences? The course also surveys qualitative and quantitative methodologies, exploring the relationship between theory, methods, and the broader goals of research within the social sciences. Empirically grounded writings will explore the links between research frameworks, methodologies, data collection and theoretical claims. Readings will include classic texts by Karl Marx and Max Weber and more contemporary theorists such as Michel Foucault, David Harvey and Judith Butler, among others. Guest lectures by Gallatin faculty will introduce students to a range of methodologies (ethnography, quantitative data sets, the case study method, documentary analysis, interviewing and survey methods) and interdisciplinary research frameworks.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG9100 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

BERLIN: Berlin's Modern History and Culture: A European Perspective

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BERLIN. Germany’s profound influence on Modern European history and culture is felt nowhere as visibly as in Berlin. This interdisciplinary course analyzes the city’s contributions to culture––in literature, memoir, music, film and painting––and its politics in the wider context of European trends. The course provides a comprehensive survey of Modern Berlin history and examines how artists reflected on those changing times. Special topics include: Christopher Isherwood’s fictionalized memoirs during the Weimar Years, the Nazi Aesthetic during the Berlin 1936 Olympics as constructed by filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl, the photo-realist reflections of painter Gerhard Richter on terrorism in Berlin in the 1970s, and Germany’s literary reassessment of guilt and victimhood following reunification. Readings and lectures are supplemented with walking tours of Berlin and its museums, to look at traces of historical, social and cultural change in situ; how memory, history and place interact over time in specific locations.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9300 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

MADRID: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-MADRID. This course consists of an agency-based internship and a campus-based seminar at the academic center that allows students to integrate theory and practice skills gained from academic course work with authentic fieldwork experiences. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analystically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

ELEC-GG2840 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Citizenship Culture: Art, Urban Governance and Public Participation

2 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Antanas Mockus

Description

In January 1995, Antanas Mockus became Mayor of Bogotá, Colombia. Over two non-consecutive terms of three years each, he assumed the challenge of governing a city in crisis, disrupted by chaos, corruption, and violence. He did so by fostering a cultural transformation through attention to pedagogy, public policy, and art—an approach to governing that he calls “Citizenship Culture.” This course examines theoretical, governmental, and public discussions around individual behaviors that have a collective impact—both desirable (like saving water or paying voluntary taxes) and harmful (law-breaking, tax evasion, and intolerance). During the course, students at NYU will work on collaborative projects with graduate students in Vilnius, Lithuania, and Bogota, Colombia. We will begin by reviewing the case of Bogotá. We then use readings on politics and public policy to generate reflections on the relationship between social structure, civic culture, and individual decision-making. Course material may include readings by Jürgen Habermas, Basil Bernstein, John Elster, Doris Sommer, Raymond Fisman and Edward Miguel.

Notes

This 2-unit course meets the first seven weeks only. Registration is by permission of the instructor. To request permission, send a short note to gallatin.global@nyu.edu explaining your interest in and previous experience with the themes of the course. In the note, indicate which of the authors listed in the course description, if any, you have already studied. Please allow 2-3 weeks for a decision.

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1795 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Art and Ethics

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Christopher Trogan

Syllabus

Description

The relationship between art and ethics has been a significant philosophical problem since antiquity and one that continues to engage us. While some argue that art is autonomous from ethics, others insist that ethics is a necessary component of art and of one’s aesthetic judgment of the work. This course explores the various positions that have been taken in this debate and raises several key questions: Can art be morally enlightening and, if so, how? If a work of art is morally better, does that make it better as art? Is morally deficient art to be shunned, or even censored? Do subjects of artworks have rights as to how they are represented? Do artists have duties as artists and duties as human beings, and if so, to whom? How much tension is there between the demands of art and the demands of life? These questions will be examined through the lens of painting (Rembrandt, Picasso), cinema (Pasolini, Reed, Griffith), photography (Mann, Mapplethorpe) and literature (Nabokov) with readings drawn from Hume, Plato, Tolstoy, Wilde, Nussbaum, Danto, as well as other contemporary philosophers, artists, and critics.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1648 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

Environment and Development in Africa

4 units Tue
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Rosalind Fredericks

Syllabus

Description

This course explores the political ecology of African development in historic perspective. Drawing from anthropology, geography, environmental history, development studies, and political science, the course joins theoretical and empirical perspectives on the politics of African environments. The first part will focus on the history of human-environment relations on the continent, paying particular attention to the exploitation of the natural environment during colonialism and patterns of extraction and trade set up during that time. Building on this history, we will then concentrate on the postcolonial period in order to compare different forms of exploitation across Africa and their connections to key development debates and national development trajectories. Specific topics may include: the extractive industries; the management of the urban environment; wildlife conservation and tourism; agriculture and rural livelihoods; and gendered access to resources. Aiming to provide more complex, critical, and nuanced understandings of human-environment relations on the continent, we will draw from academic texts and novels as well as documentaries. Readings may include: James Ferguson, Gregg Mitman, Michael Watts, and Adam Hochschild.

Notes

Sect 002 for Environmental Studies majors.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

CLI-UG1444 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Lyrics on Lockdown

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Piper Anderson

Syllabus

Description

This course will focus on the uses of the visual and performing arts as tools for positive social change. Through hands-on collaboration with the East River Academy, students will create artistic and dialogical spaces for critically thinking about the crisis of incarceration in this country and how this crisis impacts the lives of youth and their communities. Speakers may include representatives from the Institute for Juvenile Justice & Alternatives, Voices Unbroken, and Fortune Society. Readings include writings by scholar/activists such as Augusto Boal, Paulo Freire, Michelle Alexander and Angela Davis. Students will create arts-in-education workshops, which they will facilitate with incarcerated youth at Rikers Island. Students do not need to be artists to participate in the course, however, creativity, community building, and collaboration will be an integral part of the curriculum.

Notes

To participate in this course you must be available on Saturday mornings from 9-12pm for visits to Rikers in November-December. Students are also required to attend two Saturday workshop prep sessions in October from 10-5pm.

Type

Community Learning Courses (CLI-UG)

CORE-GG2403 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Master's Thesis II

2 units

Description

Application: [forthcoming] Description: To pass this class, which is a two-credit course supervised by the student’s advisor, the student must submit and defend thesis. In the first months of the semester, the student continues to work in collaboration with the adviser to complete the thesis paper or, in the case of an artistic thesis, the artwork as well as the related research essay and other required accompanying materials. All students are required to attend one meeting at the start of the semester (registered students will be emailed information about place and time at the beginning of the semester) with MA Program faculty and staff to discuss the overall goals of the course. Finally, students should draw on the resources of the MA Program (individual consultations with writing specialists, peer writing groups, themed writing workshops) during the writing process. As prescribed by the online Thesis and Defense calendar (http://www.gallatin.nyu.edu/academics/graduate/thesis/calendars.html), students must receive approval for all work from their adviser far enough in advance of the defense so that the other panelists will have at least four weeks to read and inspect the submission. For more details, please see the additional information about Master's Thesis II on the Gallatin website as well as the thesis and defense calendar and submission forms.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2402.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ARTS-UG1204 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Everyday Dance: Creating a Practice

4 units Wed
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Leslie Satin

Description

In this workshop, focused on dance and choreography, students will discover what it means to have a dance practice: to approach dancing with commitment, attention, devotion, curiosity, energy, and rigor. As movers and scholars, we will investigate questions invigorating contemporary experimental dance, body/mind integration, and Movement Research; we will explore the epistemology of the body. This workshop assumes a double notion of the “everyday”: the opportunity to work not only with technical dance lexicons but also with pedestrian movement—to explore those actions we perform in our “real lives” and reconsider them as material for choreography; and the idea of Daily Dance, in which we commit to dancing every day, locating and developing our individual dance and movement vocabularies, creating choreography from those movements and the experience of moving. Guided by structured improvisation, we will experiment with finding movement that feels authentic to us, and we will consider what that authenticity involves or implies. We will explore what, if anything, is “natural” about dance movement; and we will examine the cultural underpinnings of our movement choices. We will dance alone and with others—as witnesses, collaborators, partners. We will make scores, studies, dances, interarts performances. We will bring language into the mix. We will be supported in our studio practice by critical, theoretical, reflective, and historical writings emerging from multiple disciplines: dance, performance, theater, music; visual art; literature; autobiography; architecture; philosophy/phenomenology/Buddhism; creativity theory; neuroscience; technology. Sources may include John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Anna Halprin, Laurence Halprin, Allan Kaprow, Daniel Levitin, Linda Montano, Georges Perec, Yvonne Rainer, Anne Truitt, Marcia Tucker.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1739 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
FA 2015

Kinship and Community: Ancient Texts and Modern Theories

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Bruce King

Syllabus

Description

What is the relation of the family to larger structures of community and of state? Do kinship bonds provide a model for those of community or must they be superseded in the interest of a more enlightened state? To what degree do contemporary aspirations for gender equality entail a radical renovation of our understanding of the family? We consider these questions through a close reading of ancient texts, from the Greek and Judeo-Christian traditions, which we read in conjunction with some contemporary thinkers on kinship and the state. Primary readings include: Aeschylus  Oresteia , Homeric  Hymn to Demeter , Sophocles  Oedipus Tyrannus  and  Antigone , Euripides  Ion , Plato  Republic , Aristophanes  Ecclesiazusae , Longus  Daphnis and Chloe , Genesis and Exodus, Paul  Romans  and  Galatians ,  Martyrdom of Perpetua , Shakespeare  Measure for Measure , Kushner  Angels in America ; theoretical texts include: Freud  Totem and Taboo  and  Moses and Monotheism , and selections from Engels, Lévi-Strauss, G. Rubin, P. Clastres, A. Rich, and J. Butler.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

PRACT-UG9250 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

LONDON: Global Fashion Industry: Britain

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON: Taught at the London College of Fashion, this NYU course will provide students with significant knowledge of the contemporary fashion industry in the United Kingdom as well as the UK’s position in the global fashion arena. The course addresses the structure of retail covering all levels of the market: designer, luxury, ready-to-wear and mass-market. Students will learn about colour, fabrics and the language of buying. They will be introduced to the major roles and responsibilities of a product team and will be taught how trend forecasters predict the future. Students will learn about Range-Planning, Product Development, Buying, Design, Strategy, Marketing, Promotion, Costing and Sourcing. The course ends with an overview of fashion futures – showing the growing significance of technology, sustainability and innovation.

Type

Global Programs (PRACT-UG)

IDSEM-UG1831 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
FA 2015

Enlightenment Subjects and Subjections

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Andrea Gadberry

Description

This semester, we will read broadly in literary, philosophical, and political works of the Enlightenment as we ask how this period understood what it meant to be human – and what it meant to be a human in relationship to others. The first third of our course will examine works that will let us ask how authors of the period conceived of "man" and world. Looking at these classic texts (which will move us from skeptical philosophy to theories of feeling to proposals that we consider humans as machines), we will then turn to works that unsettle this category of “man” and allow us to consider other possibilities: citizen, foreigner, woman, and slave. How might these works complicate how we understand personhood? How do the Enlightenment ideals of reason and freedom fare when confronted with subjects neither considered to have reason nor granted freedom? We’ll finish our semester with an eye toward figures who critique Enlightenment reason and represent their own subjectivity in autobiographical texts. Primary texts may include David Hume,  An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding , Adam Smith,  Theory of Moral Sentiments , Mary Wollstonecraft,  A Vindication of the Rights of Woman , Voltaire,  Candide , Montesquieu,  Persian Letters , Olaudah Equiano,  The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano… , and Jean-Jacques Rousseau,  Confessions .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1388 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Thinking About Seeing

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Keith Miller

Syllabus

Description

Through an art historical lens, this course explores visual communication in a media-saturated society. We will analyze how people “speak” through images and symbols as well as words and how we “read” what we see. This class will attempt to understand the tools used to reach an audience. Images and texts from the past and present will help us assess the character of various media and their personal as well as political implications. Texts will include works by Barthes, Baudrillard, Benjamin, Lev-Strauss, McLuhan, Sontag and other seminal essays on the media.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1794 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
FA 2015

History and Memory in the Early Modern Atlantic World

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Laurie Woodard

Description

History and Memory in the Early Modern Atlantic World explores the history, memory, and representation of enslavement and abolition in the Atlantic World, circa 1500 to 1888. The key questions we are posing are: how do we recover the unrecoverable and how do we remember the “unrememberable?” We will consider the history of enslavement in the Atlantic World, the gaps in our knowledge, the global trauma of Atlantic World Slavery, and contemporary and contemporaneous representations. Key themes include: the formation of the Atlantic World, enslavement, the transatlantic slave trade, the formation of African American cultures, the emergence of race and racism, resistance and rebellion, abolition, emancipation and the meaning of freedom. We will delve into primary sources and secondary literature including non-fiction, fiction, critical analysis, film, music, and visual arts to consider the ways in which the tentacles of the past reach into and influence the present and future. The reading list may include works by Olaudah Equiano, David Northrop, Deborah Gray White, Toni Morrison, and Saidiya Hartman.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9250 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

LONDON: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. This course consists of an agency-based internship and a campus-based seminar at the academic center that allows students to integrate theory and practice skills gained from academic course work with authentic fieldwork experiences. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analystically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

FIRST-UG399 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: Community & Collaboration

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Margaret Galvan

Syllabus

Description

When studying literature, we often focus on individual creators—Henry David Thoreau, Virginia Woolf, Langston Hughes—to the near exclusion of their communities of influence. What would it mean to flip the script and concentrate on what role not only community but also collaboration play in individually-authored texts? Studying writers’ communities from the mid-nineteenth century to the modern day, we will consider how to build a canon that more fully acknowledges interpersonal relationships. We will ask what forms of writing lend themselves particularly well to acknowledging the influence of community. We will also explore the larger question of how valuing collaboration might speak to our digital reading and writing practices. We will build our own writing communities, first in a digital space where students will compose short writing assignments and comment on others’ reflections. Then, students will work through the writing process together to compose a series of longer essays around a central theme and collaboratively write an introduction that links all the pieces together. Texts may include selections from the following communities, collectives, and groupings: Transcendental Club, Bloomsbury, Harlem Renaissance, modernists, Confessional School, second-wave feminists, zine culture.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

FIRST-UG411 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: Scandal and Spectacle

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Anastasiya Osipova

Description

What is interesting about bad behavior and provocation? In this writing seminar we will explore works of literature, visual art and critical thought that either depict or have caused scandals. We will engage recent as well as ancient material —from Pussy Riot to Sophocles’  Antigone —and will focus on the first half of the twentieth-century. We will analyze strategies, forms, and styles of defiance, and think about the complex set of cultural, economic, religious and political relations that are revealed through scandals. Some of the concepts and problems that we will be addressing are commodity, icon, fetish, shock, scandal, tragedy, manifesto, the intersections between religion and the secular avant-garde, the influence of the sensationalist press on the novel and “serious” literature, as well as the relationship between modern and archaic. The authors and materials we will deal with in this course include Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Italian and Russian Futurist artists and poets, Constructivists, Dadaists, Victor Shklovsky, Kazimir Malevich, Marcel Duchamp, Guy Debord and Pussy Riot.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1617 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Philosophy of Religion

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Jeffrey Morris

Description

Is there such thing as religion—definable and singular? If there is no agreement, how can we have a philosophy of it? Departing from this predicament, this course will first examine how “religion” has been construed over time and in a variety of contexts. After touching upon various Western medieval endeavors to “prove” God’s existence, we’ll attend to the nineteenth century and Friedrich Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals . We will consider the ways in which Nietzsche employs Hegel’s master/slave dialectic to identify the psychological state of ressentiment as a key factor in the birth and character of Jewish/Christian morality. Also, William James’s Varieties of Religious Experience will be read as a groundbreaking study in the psychological states of religious consciousness. We will also draw Western notions of the ineffability of God—especially as appearing in the Pseudo-Dionysian tradition of the via negativa—into conversation with the second century (CE) Buddhist philosophy of Nagarjuna and his influences on the Zen/Ch’an tradition. Finally, we’ll explore recent reimaginings of religion in light of postmodern themes such as nihilism and the death of God. Readings include: Anselm of Canterbury, Friedrich Nietzsche, William James, Teresa of Avila, Mircea Eliade, Rene Girard, Gianni Vattimo, Pseudo-Dionysius, Nagarjuna, and Shunyru Suzuki.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1435 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Artists' Books

4 units Wed
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Meleko Mokgosi

Description

As an alternative to the politics and limitations of studio practices, artists’ books since William Blake’s  Songs of Innocence and of Experience  have allowed artists to experiment with conceptual ideas, visual and literary materials, as well as production practices. This course will begin with the precedent that Blake set, and investigate the numerous manifestations of the artist’s book. Course material will consider exhibitions and special libraries, and will look at the work of artists and collectives such as Ed Rucha, Cobra, Guy Debord, Fluxus, and Andy Warhol, to name a few. In responding to this material, students will also work on a final project and produce their own artist’s book.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1647 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Making Virtual Sense: 3D Graphics Studio for Critically-Driven Creative Applications

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Carl Skelton

Syllabus

Description

Until recently, the creation of interactive 3D graphics was only possible for large and capital-intensive uses: the armed forces, large-scale architectural/engineering work, mass entertainment. Now, open-source applications and powerful personal and portable computers are making it practical for individuals and small groups to independently build and share alternative visions. Whether you are interested in exploring new ways to construct complex networks of ideas in the present, or to imagine physical spaces to reflect and support new ways of life, this arts workshop provides a blend of critical orientation and hands-on experience. In this open project studio, the majority of course time and work will be taken up with the development of student-built individual or small team concepts, to be developed as 3D graphic "fly-through" models. Theoretical discussions will be initiated with a mix of relevant writings and media. Here is a representative sampling of sources: Douglas Engelbart, Eric Raymond, William Gibson, Zaha Hadid, Judith Donath, the Athenian Acropolis, the Kalachakra mandala, Salisbury Cathedral, the Schindler house, Artigas gardens, the 1958 World's fair Philips pavilion, the Seagram's building, Grant Theft Auto IV, the monastery of La Tourette, the Mangin plan, compendium.org, Betaville.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1059 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Disease and Civilization

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Gene Cittadino

Syllabus

Description

This course explores the cultural, social, scientific, and political dimensions of epidemic disease through an examination of selected episodes from plagues in antiquity to AIDS, Ebola, avian flu, and bioterrorism in our time. We approach the problem of understanding the role of disease in human history from two different, but interrelated, perspectives: an ecological perspective, making use of a combination of environmental, biological, and cultural factors to help explain the origin and spread of epidemics, and a cultural/social history perspective, emphasizing the interaction of cultural values, religious beliefs, scientific knowledge, medical practice, economics, and politics in shaping perceptions of the nature, causes, cures, and significance of various diseases. Readings range from Thucydides and the Hippocratic writings to Boccaccio, Defoe, and Orwell, including, where possible, nonwestern sources, along with a variety of recent works that discuss the historical, social, and biological aspects of epidemic disease in different cultural and geographical settings.

Notes

Section 002 for Environmental Studies majors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1608 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Justice and the Political

4 units Fri
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Justin Holt

Syllabus

Description

Justice is often understood as a concept that structures political life, by indicating who should be enfranchised, how to rule fairly, who should be punished and how. Even more broadly, "justice" indicates what constitutes a common good as well as who should benefit (and how) from collective actions. But how is the definition of justice established and implemented? Does justice denote a transcendent standard we access by philosophy or by revelation and then "apply" to and in political life? Or is any definition of justice necessarily shaped by political struggles by actors with contrasting interests and points of views ? Must we escape politics to determine justice rightly, or is that an impossible and ultimately tyrannical idea? But if we define justice through politics, is what we call justice necessarily going to be the rule of the strong? This course will consider three attempts to define justice that also explore its relationship to politics: Plato's  Republic , Kant's  Groundwork for a Metaphysics of Morals , Hegel's  Philosophy of Right .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9350 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

PARIS: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PARIS. This course consists of an agency-based internship and a campus-based seminar at the academic center that allows students to integrate theory and practice skills gained from academic course work with authentic fieldwork experiences. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analystically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1832 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Genetics and Society

2 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Myles Jackson

Syllabus

Description

This seven-week course focuses on the recent developments in genetics and how they shape, and conversely are shaped by, society. Topics include three of the most important social aspects of genomic research over the past thirty years: genetic privacy, race and genomics, and the effects on gene patenting on research. Who has access to your genetic information? Can your genetic information be sold to big pharma if your name is removed from the sample? How has the patenting of human genes reshaped the conduct of scientific research? How are molecular biology and pharmaceutical and biotech firms simultaneously challenging and reifying notions of race in the age of biocapitalism? Can one’s race be identified at the level of the gene? If so, what are the socio-cultural implications? Indeed, if not, what are the consequences? This course aims at drawing attention to the ethical, legal, and social issues generated by molecular biology from the 1980s to the present. Readings will include works from historians of science Davis, Kevles and Jackson, sociologists and anthropologists of medicine, Duster, Fullwiley, Morning, Epstein, and the science reporter Wade.

Notes

Due to overlapping subject matter between this course and Biology and Society (IDSEM-UG 1751), students will not receive credit for Genetics and Society if they have taken (or are taking) Biology and Society. Course meets first seven weeks, 9/2-10/26.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG1901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean's Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student's work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is May 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1848 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Expertise and Democracy

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Gianpaolo Baiocchi

Syllabus

Description

One of the central questions facing activists and reformers is that of expertise. We live an increasingly complex world in which experts of all sorts are unavoidable. Many of central issues facing us - from climate change to global poverty and vaccinations - are problems that require expert knowledge to adjudicate. What role should experts play in a democracy? How can we productively articulate expertise and democracy? Using activism and social change as a backdrop, students will explore theoretical questions as well as practical attempts from the world of social justice to resolve these issues. We will explore the literature in both science studies and in democratic theory and will explore a range of case studies of attempts to "democratize expertise." Guest speakers will include activists from local organizations and former Gallatin students who have gone on to pursue activism. Readings will include a range of “classic” and more contemporary texts on the connection between expertise and democracy, including: Paulo Freire, Martin Luther King, Cornel West,Frances Moore Lappe, among others.

Notes

Formerly titled and numbered, Tools for Social Change, CLI-UG 1403.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1420 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Rites of Passage into Contemporary Art Practice

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Barnaby Ruhe

Syllabus

Description

Modern art has been a balancing act between control and letting go. This course focuses on the psychological interface between the two, the “liminal” zone. We will survey modern artists’ techniques for tapping sources of creativity, including Dada collagists’ free-associations; Surrealists’ automatic writing, doodles, and “cadavres exquises”; and Abstract Expressionists’ embrace of chaos. We will engage in simple exercises: doodling, speed drawing, painting an abstract mural as a group, keeping a liminal journal, collaging, and exploring ritualistic techniques. We will follow up with discussions, take a trip to the Met, and conclude the course reexamining modern art in light of the inner journey each of us has taken during the course. Readings include van Gennep's Rites of Passage, Chipp's Theories of Modern Art, R.D. Laing, Federico Garcia Lorca on duende, Victor Turner on liminal, Mircea Eliade, James Elkins on alchemy and art, and Frida Kahlo's journal.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1635 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Digital Art and New Media

4 units Fri
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Cynthia Allen

Syllabus

Description

This workshop seeks to bring students from varying backgrounds together to engage in evaluating and developing digital new media for the Internet and other new media art installations. The Internet makes possible a powerful new kind of student-centered, constructivist learning by collecting at a single site a phenomenal array of learning and creative resources that can be explored with simple point-and-click skills: photos, text, animation, audio and film materials. Emerging new media technologies allow cross-development and implementation to the Internet. Each student brings to the class a set of experiences and skills, such as research, writing, design, film, music, photography, computer gaming, performance, illustration, computer literacy, software knowledge or Internet experience. Through lectures, including a survey of digital new media currently on the Internet, group discussions, field trips and workshops, focusing on their personal skills, students will develop individual projects. The workshop will deconstruct innovative new media instillations, inventions, computer games, film, that use digital new media, as well as discuss concepts, content strategies, and frameworks that bridge theory and practice. Class projects, readings, writings, and Blog journal-keeping are essential components of this course. Students are encouraged to supply their own media.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1778 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Punk Aesthetics

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Joshua Shirkey

Syllabus

Description

Although punk seemed to be non- or even anti-aesthetic, it has paradoxically proven to be among the most significant artistic phenomena of the last half century. If the western aesthetic tradition is based in notions of beauty and conformity to accepted standards, this course will ask whether a movement or sensibility that has prided itself on being ugly, offensive, and outlaw can be said to have an aesthetic—and if not, of what relevance is the aesthetic tradition to contemporary art? Of particular interest will be the politics of aesthetics, and the way punk provided a forum for the expression of racial, gender, sexual, and class difference outside the privileged position traditionally assumed by aesthetics. Readings will include classic texts in aesthetic thought (Burke, Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche) and contemporary critical theory and sociology (Guy Debord, Herbert Marcuse, Pierre Bourdieu, and Dick Hebdige). These will be considered in dialogue with American, British, French, and German works of music, visual art, film, literature, graphic design, and fashion from the 1970s and 1980s, as well as earlier historical works that were significant influences on that generation.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG35 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Family

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Patrick McCreery

Syllabus

Description

In our society, the concept of “family” is paradoxically omnipresent but elusive: politicians seek to define it, marketers struggle to reach it, artists attempt to represent it, and many individuals hope to transcend it. This course offers both a critical examination of family in the United States and a survey of the academic disciplines that study it. As we will see, legal, social, and personal definitions of family are fluid because historical processes such as slavery, immigration, feminism, and gay liberation re-shape popular conceptualizations of family. Similarly, disciplines such as history, sociology, biology, law, literature, and literary theory routinely offer new and sometimes contradictory ways of understanding family. This course will use these disciplines to illuminate the complicated ideas and emotions that can surround what arguably are our closest relationships. Works we may study include Margaret Atwood's  The Handmaid's Tale , Octavia Butler's  Kindred , Eric Klinenberg's  Going Solo , Adrienne Rich's  Of Woman Born , and the photography of Sally Mann.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

SASEM-UG9402 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

PRAGUE: Civil Resistance in Central and Eastern Europe

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. Civil resistance is not the same as opting out of society or having views that go against the grain. It is fundamentally about deciding not to conform with repressive regimes. It is also about choosing a mode of action that brings with it personal dangers even when, as is usual, it advocates non-violence. This course examines the nature and significance of civil resistance in Central and Eastern Europe in the 20th century. In studying resistance literature (including poetry and song), art and film, we will draw on ideas and arguments from the disciplines of history, political science, literature, art criticism, film studies and psychology.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1522 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Thin Stories: Alternative Narrative Strategies

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Anthony Tognazzini

Syllabus

Description

This course will explore a strain of storytelling that might seem, at first glance, a little spindly. The texts under examination will feature extreme compression, elliptical structures, and conspicuous narrative absences, storytelling modes that stand in direct opposition to the larger scope, causal sequencing, and exposition-heavy style often found in conventional novels and short stories. In the class readings and their own original work, students will investigate fiction that proposes new formal approaches, incorporates strategies from poetry and other genres, and "minimizes" the traditional narrative arc by slicing it up in new ways. Texts will include Yasunari Kawabata’s  Palm of the Hand Stories , Anne Carson’s  Autobiography of Red , Lydia Davis’s  Almost No Memory , Joe Wenderoth’s  Letters To Wendy’s  and Italo Calvino’s  Invisible Cities , among others. Ultimately, the class will be a kind of creative laboratory where students can craft experimental narrative forms, discovering their own “thin stories” and the rich, tricky possibilities therein.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1869 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Babel

4 units Wed
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Todd Porterfield

Description

How might we examine the myth of Babel to test assumptions about belonging and separateness? The construction of the Tower and its destruction by God, who then covered the earth with uncomprehending multitudes, would seem to be a story of uniformity, ambition, and then essential difference, of architecture, power, identity, language, and geographic spread. For thousands of years and from the Bible to the Early Modern to today, it seems to haunts us in architectural and imperial ambitions, in film and mass media, in high and contemporary art, in dystopian nightmares about globalization, in novels of authoritarian repression and novellas of spell-binding imaginings of freedom and connectedness. In this seminar we will analyze many of its figurations in Biblical and archaeological scholarship, literature, art and architectural history, film and visual studies, linguistics, philosophy, politics, and history. The subject leaves few alternatives but to broach the culture, politics, and philosophy of living together, and so we will explore some possible alternatives in peace and hospitality, in translation and in embracing the incompetence of language. Amongst the authors encountered, there will be Borges, Derrida, Gideon, Goethe, Huntington, Kafka, Kant, Mirzoeff, and Wordsworth.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Internship

4 units

Description

Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City’s many social institutions in the arts, media, government, business, nonprofit or community action sectors. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them to explore the relationship between practical experience and academic theory, as well to pursue career options. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. Students work anywhere from 8 to 24 hours each week; for each credit, students are expected to devote three to four hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and at least seven to nine hours per week during the six-week summer sessions.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is September 8. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students are required to attend two workshops. Workshop I: Sept. 17, 12:30pm-1:30pm; Workshop II: Oct.15, 12:30pm-1:30pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

ELEC-GG2770 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Demi-Mondes and Dance Worlds

4 units Tue
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Julie Malnig

Description

Worlds of social dance often find their genesis among artists, rebels, non-conformists, and others who are deliberately or accidently marginal to mainstream capitalist culture. From the bordellos of Buenos Aires, where tango was born, to the honky-tonks of Nashville, to the jazz clubs of New Orleans and New York, to say nothing of contemporary raves, social dance’s roots may be found in transgressive behavior. Dancers in these scenes are often referred to as obsessed, addicted, and out of control. But whose control? In this course we examine the relation of the moving body to music and transgression, analyzing the way aesthetic styles create demimondes and subcultures that transform gender relations and public affect writ large. Beginning with theories of the aesthetic that explain the power of the body in cultural expression, we move on to examine dance worlds in their historical and ethnographic context, paying close attention to the politics of the body and its influence on changing parameters of social permissibility. We will also explore dancers’ efforts to test behaviors and assert identities outside the confines of the ordered, everyday world and consider what qualities are lost or gained when these dances become adopted for mainstream consumption. We will read works by Pierre Bourdieu, Marcel Mauss, Jacques Ranciere, Jose Munoz, Jane Desmond, Sarah Thornton, Fiona Buckland, Robert Farris Thompson, Julie Taylor, Juliet McMains, Frances Aparicio, Marta Savigliano, Barbara Browning, and Tricia Rose, among others.

Notes

Same as PERF-GT- 2311. Team-taught with Prof. Deborah Kapchan (from Tisch).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

ARTS-UG1105 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Integrating Mind and Body

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Robin Powell

Syllabus

Description

This experiential workshop explores the theory and practice of The Alexander Technique, The Feldenkrais Method, Kinetic Awareness, and its predecessors. The developers of these methods recognize that the ability to notice sensations, feelings, differences, and changes in the body lead to better integration of the mind and body and can effect profound changes in functioning. These techniques are valuable for anyone who wants to gain more freedom of expression, range of motion, comfort, concentration and presence in their work, art and daily lives. By using focused attention to sense your body in motion and at rest muscular tension and poor body habits can be released. The course is designed for the student who is ready to commit to an in-depth investigation of their body and is ready to make physical and mental changes through quiet focused attention. Each class will be divided between lecture, discussion, and experiential material. Students will keep a journal relating to their experience in and out of class and weekly readings. A final project will reflect personal interest and include class experience and readings. Readings include Mirka Knaster's  The Knowing Body  and articles on the various methods.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1782 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Madness and Civilization

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Yevgeniya Traps

Syllabus

Description

“Much madness is divinest sense,” Emily Dickinson wrote, further observing that “much sense [is] starkest madness.” The poet insisted that the majority sets and enforces the standard by which sanity is evaluated, and we will take this notion as our starting premise. How are social standards for what is and is not normal set? How are they enforced? What is at stake in maintaining definitions of mental health? How have these definitions changed over time? What is the price of transgressing the boundaries of sanity? What might be the privileges conferred by madness? Using writing as a way of reading closely and thinking critically, students will produce three analytical and literary critical essays and a research paper, as well as present on a topic or issue connected to the course theme. Our readings may include works by Michel Foucault, Chester Brown, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Anne Sexton, Sigmund Freud, and Ken Kesey. We will also consider a number of visual works by artists like Yayoi Kusama and Henry Darger.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

PRACT-UG9200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

FLORENCE:Global Fashion Industry: Italy

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. This seminar will provide students with significant knowledge of the contemporary fashion industry in Italy as well as Italy’s position in the global fashion arena. The course addresses the structure of retail covering all levels of the market: designer, luxury, ready-to-wear and mass-market. Students will learn about color, fabrics and the language of buying. They will be introduced to the major roles and responsibilities of a product team and will be taught how trend forecasters predict the future. Students will learn about Range-Planning, Product Development, Buying, Design, Strategy, Production, Marketing, Promotion, Costing and Sourcing.

Type

Global Programs (PRACT-UG)

IDSEM-UG1450 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
EARLY
FA 2015

Machiavelli: Popular Power and the Space of Appearances

2 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
George Shulman

Syllabus

Description

This two-credit course focuses on Machiavelli’s political theory. Our goal is two-fold: we learn the art of close reading, to reveal the complex and contradictory layers of meaning in our texts, and we explore the enterprise of political theory by lingering over the central questions Machiavelli raises. What is the nature of power? What is the character of “good” leadership? What is the relationship between morality and politics? How can human beings sustain forms of self-government, given their short-sightedness and fear, the predatory and narrow interests of ruling classes, and the tendency of institutions to become reified forms of power? We focus on his two greatest texts, but also read several of his greatest interpreters.

Notes

Open to sophomores only. Course meets last seven weeks,10/22-12/10.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ELEC-GG2780 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

The Poetics of Knowledge in South Asia and the Middle East

4 units Wed
4:55 PM - 7:35 PM
Nosheen Ali

Description

This course will examine how poetic thought and practice shapes notions of history, self, collectivity, and change in South Asia and the Middle East. The course considers “poetic knowledge” as a term that might encapsulate the value and meaning of the poetic as a mode of being, seeing and doing in the world. We will delve into the breadth and depth of non-Western literary thought, theory and practice in South Asia and the Middle East, reading key texts by poets, historians, and anthropologists including A. K. Ramanujan, Ann Gold, Lila Abu-Lughod, Steve Caton, and Sheldon Pollock. Alongside, we will read selected, poetic texts in translation from a variety of languages including Braj, Urdu, Persian, Sindhi, and Punjabi. Course themes include poetic knowledge as a reflection on history and society, gender and power in poetic traditions, poetry and political critique, and the relationship between poetic idiom and spiritual subjectivity.

Notes

Same as HIST-GA1001 and MEIS-GA 2715. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (nosheen.ali@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1351 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or EARLY
or GLOBAL
FA 2015

Passion and Poetics in Early Japan

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Nina Cornyetz

Syllabus

Description

It can be argued that until the 1880s one thing was almost entirely absent in Japanese literary and performing arts: the notion of an interiorized subject. In fact, the ancient Japanese arts are examples of extreme "exteriority" that privilege form, word play and intertextuality and enfold the human being and human erotic passions within rituals for purity and harmony with a cosmology of the heavens. This course will explore ancient and premodern Japanese poetics and prose, performing and visual arts, from the very first writings through the nineteenth century, in relation to sociocultural history and belief systems such as Buddhism and Shintoism. Texts will include: selections of poetry,  emaki  (picture scrolls), noh and puppet plays, selections from  The Tale of Genji ,  The Pillow Book , and the earliest forms of manga.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1011 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Voicing the Text

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Jessie Austrian

Syllabus

Description

In this class we study vocal and performance technique, as well as the art of rhetoric and persuasive communication. We will put these two studies together to practice and investigate how to communicate thought and evoke pathos, understanding and action from our audiences. Students will discuss, analyze and perform texts from classic and modern plays and poetry, as well as ancient and contemporary political texts. This course will ask questions such as: What is the difference between texts that are intended to be heard versus texts that are intended to be read? How do the musical qualities of the voice (such as tone, timbre and inflection) affect the content and reception of the message? How does a performer give voice to a playwright's words? How do our vocal habits affect our ability to communicate clearly? How can we each use our natural voice to its best and most profound effect?

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

WRTNG-UG1537 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Crafting Short Fiction from the Sentence Up

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Steven Rinehart

Syllabus

Description

This class explores the craft of writing, starting with the sentence and ending with the scene. Half of each class is devoted to craft exercises and the remaining half to a traditional workshop approach to discussing student submissions. By the end of the semester we’ll be able to talk intelligently about some of the “micro” parts of a short story or novel, giving the students some practical tools for editing those parts.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

FIRST-UG343 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: Writers on Writing

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
June Foley

Description

George Orwell named four reasons for writing: “egoism,” “aesthetic enthusiasm,” “historical impulse,” and “political purpose.” Franz Kafka stressed the emotional power of words in describing writing as “an ax for the frozen sea within us.” Gustave Flaubert stressed the limitations of language, as “a cracked kettle on which we beat out tunes for bears to dance to, when all the while we long to move the stars to pity.” In this course, students learn to write the academic essay while reading and analyzing writing  about  writing. Our texts, exemplary works in various genres, may include essays by Orwell and Joan Didion; Rainer Maria Rilke’s  Letters to a Young Poet ; Lillian Ross’s  New Yorker  profile of Ernest Hemingway; a speech and TV interview with Zadie Smith, an essay and TV interview with David Foster Wallace, and brief print interviews with Yiyun Li and Gary Shteyngart; Julian Barnes’s novel  Flaubert’s Parrot ; and short stories about the writing life by E.L. Doctorow, Grace Paley, Lorrie Moore, Etgar Keret, and Alice Munro. We may attend a reading, and a writer or editor will be our guest.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1740 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Bridging Culture and Nature: An Introduction to Conservation Science

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Jim Tolisano

Syllabus

Description

This course is designed for those who wish to deepen our relationship to nature and then learn how to apply this understanding to the challenging work of conservation biology. The art and science of conservation biology brings together leading thinking from biology, economics, anthropology, psychology, literature, art, and communications to conserve the diversity of life found on our planet. In this class we will discover how business entrepreneurs, social scientists, wildlife biologists, and artists all play an integral role in creating and delivering practical conservation solutions. We will begin with an exploration of our own relationship to the natural world. We then examine what biological diversity is, the principal threats to biological systems, and specific actions that are being taken to reverse these threats and protect life on earth. We also explore the premise that “managing” the ecology of the planet really requires us to manage ourselves and the human cultures we have created. The fieldwork of the physical and biological sciences provides the foundation from which our work as conservation biologists proceeds. However, the applied work of the social sciences, education, business, humanities and arts then serve as the tools we need to manage ourselves and create a relationship with nature that is mutually supportive. Students will be required to research and share their learnings around a selected conservation biology topic, and complete a practical project that demonstrates how each of us can make a difference in strengthening our relationship to nature. At the course conclusion students from all disciplines should see a role for themselves in the conservation work that is an essential part of our next century. Readings will include Sodhi and Erlich’s Conservation Biology for All, as well as selected readings from Nabhan, Snyder, Goodall, Tempest Williams, Ackerman, Kolbert, Margulis, and others.

Notes

Section 2 for Environmental Studies majors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

COLLQ-UG1 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Colloquium

2 units

Description

Recommended for students who expect to complete their colloquium in the 2015-2016 academic year. Students are expected to meet with their primary academic adviser over the course of the semester in which they plan to register and sit for their colloquium. For more details, please see information about the colloquium on the Gallatin website. This course is not repeatable for credit.

Notes

Open to Gallatin seniors by permission only. To register, please add this course to your plan of study form. After the form is approved by your adviser, you will receive additional registration information from Gallatin’s Office of Student Services. To add this course after the initial registration period, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Colloquium (COLLQ-UG)

FIRST-UG77 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Play and Games in Early China

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Ethan Harkness

Syllabus

Description

In this class we will combine academic study with an experiential approach to the topic of games and, more generally, participatory entertainment in Early China. Thus, in addition to thinking about the meaning of play as a universal human activity and contextualizing examples of popular games from the Chinese tradition with background reading on related philosophical and cosmological beliefs, we will learn the fundamentals of the ancient Chinese game of  weiqi  (Go), a favorite pastime of scholars since the Han dynasty. Students will be introduced to on-line resources that allow them to play the game in real time with opponents from around the world, and they will also visit local New York City Go clubs. Through diligent study, students will be expected to achieve a reasonable level of competence in the game and asked to demonstrate that for a portion of their final grade. By demanding immersion in an absorbing and characteristically Chinese activity that has remained essentially unchanged over at least two millennia, it is hoped that students will begin to recognize the fundamental humanity they share with the former peoples of Early China. Readings may include  Homo Ludens  by J. Huizinga,  Man, Play and Games  by Roger Caillois, selections from  Science and Civilization in China  by Joseph Needham,  The Art of War  by Sun-tzu, and  The Master of Go  by Yasunari Kawabata.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1689 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Night and the City: Film Noir and the Noir Imagination

4 units Fri
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Rahul Hamid

Description

This course will examine Film  Noir  as a genre coming out of the moral unrest after World War II. Film  noir  expresses a despairing vision of the world borne of the brutality and absurdity that war forced humanity to face. The atmosphere of loss and isolation in this genre   has elicited a variety of readings, some emphasizing class and racial anxieties, and others the impact of suburbanization and changing gender roles. But this course also explores the relatinship between film  noir,  and existentialist themes in literature and philosophy. Existentialism approaches enduring questions that philosophy, religion and literature have always sought to answer: Does fate, free will or chance dictate our lives? What is the proper response to atrocity and how do we assign blame or establish a moral order in the face of it? We will analyze the fallen world portrayed in  noir  by tracing these questions in the philosophy and literature that precede and accompany the moment of classic  noir  in the forties and fifties. We will read Sartre, Camus, Primo Levi, Eli Wiesel, Raymond Chandler, The Book of Job, genre theory, as well as specific film studies texts. Films will include Fritz Lang’s  Scarlet Street , Howard Hawk’s  The Big sleep , Billy Wilder’s  Double Indemnity , Roman Polanski’s  Chinatown , and Robert Altman’s  The Long Goodbye .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9100 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

BERLIN: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BERLIN. This course consists of an agency-based internship and a campus-based seminar at the academic center that allows students to integrate theory and practice skills gained from academic course work with authentic fieldwork experiences. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analystically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

ELEC-GG2546 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Writing Fiction in the Digital Age

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Lara Vapnyar

Syllabus

Description

The main goal of this course is to provide students with ways how to enhance traditional storytelling by new technologies without diminishing the role of the written word. We will examine every aspect of the craft of traditional fiction writing: plot, structure, point of view, narrative voice, dialogue, building of individual scenes, etc as well as the new techniques of the digital age: hypertext, visual and audio images, social media. We will learn how to balance the traditional with the new without overwhelming the written text with gadgets. The class will become a creative lab studying ideas by others, coming up with their own, presenting their fiction, responding to the writing of others, and discussing questions about literature, editing, and publishing in the digital age. Each student will create and present to class a work of fiction based on some of the ideas we will be discussing. The works don’t have to be in the electronic form, but the students will need to explain how they would work. Each student will create a basic website with a writer’s profile and portfolio of her works. Readings will include fiction by: Borges, Nabokov, Michael Joyce, Margaret Atwood, Jennifer Egan.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (Vapnyar@hotmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1632 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

"Woman" and the Political

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Rosanne Kennedy

Syllabus

Description

Feminist theorists have critiqued the canonical works of political theory as implicitly (and sometimes explicitly) premised on the exclusion of “woman” and the “feminine.” The “feminine” (private, domestic, passive) has been seen to be in opposition to the “masculine” political sphere (active, public, rational). In this course we will read works from the canon of political theory alongside feminist critiques. The question we will consider is: how does feminist critiques of the absence of “woman” and the “feminine” in discourses of the political affect our ideas of not only the private and public, but also those of citizenship, equality, freedom, the individual, and community? Readings may include Plato, Machiavelli, Rousseau, Locke, Marx, Arendt, Susan Okin, Luce Irigaray, Linda Zerilli, Carole Pateman, and Bonnie Honig.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1646 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

Fractured States: Border Crossings, Divisions, and Partitions

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Valerie Forman

Description

This course explores what happens when geographical spaces get divided and people are dislocated, forced to migrate, or become part of a new political entity. We focus on these geographical divisions both as larger political crises and as events that have effects at more personal and local levels, for example, on familial ties, the ability to find work, or to practice one's religion. We focus on a few regions whose borders have been and still are in crisis in different ways: Haiti and the Dominican Republic; India and Pakistan; and Israel and Palestine. Some specific questions we explore: In what ways do geographical borders participate in the creation of national, racial, or religious, identities? What happens to individuals or groups of people who live in a nation to which they do not feel a primary allegiance and to people who have multiple allegiances? In what ways do borders facilitate or demand the production of social difference? How do writers imagine the relationship of subjects to divided spaces and the relationship of those subjects to each other? How do fictional and historical works address the relationships between possibilities for peace and security and notions of justice? The class focuses primarily on literary texts and narrative films, which we place in dialogue with oral histories, personal memoir, and documentary films. Some likely authors we read in the course include: Edwige Danticat, Junot Díaz, Salman Rushdie, Sami Michael, and Ghassan Kanafani.

Notes

Same as COLIT-UA 550.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1810 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

Art and Politics in the City: New York and Buenos Aires

4 units Thu
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Alejandro Velasco

Syllabus

Description

Using advanced video-conferencing in both cities, this course brings together students in New York and Buenos Aires to examine how urban arts and politics intersect in the Americas: How are art and politics understood and expressed differently and similarly in these two American metropolises and why? How do shared aesthetic features of public art in the city reflect the global circulation of urban creative modes? What do we learn about local politics from looking at the art and writing on a city’s public spaces? Teams of students in both cities will conduct field work in key neighborhoods - among them Colegiales and San Telmo in Buenos Aires, and East Harlem and Bushwick in New York - to build upon an archive of murals, graffiti, performances, and installations begun in the spring of 2015 by students in this course. Then, drawing from readings in history, art criticism,and urban studies, as well as from census and electoral data and using GIS technology, we will analyze how social and political processes like gentrification, inequality, and planning generate and reflect creative political expression as captured in our database, culminating in transnational, collaborative projects that explore what the art and writing of city streets reveals about urban life in 21st century America.

Notes

This is a co-taught course. Students in New York and Buenos Aires meet simultaneously via video conference and work from the same syllabus.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9403 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

PRAGUE: Central European Film

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. This interdisciplinary seminar is designed to discuss and question the identity of specific nations in European space, which has always been a fascinating crossroad of ideas and ideologies as well as the birthplace of wars and totalitarian systems. The course will cover masterpieces of Russian, Hungarian, German, Polish and Czech cinematography, focusing on several crucial periods of history, in particular WWII and its aftermath, showing moral dilemmas of individuals and nations under the Nazi regime as well as revealing the bitter truth of the Stalinist years.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1564 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Advanced Poetry Writing

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Scott Hightower

Syllabus

Description

A workshop designed for serious poets, this class will teach students how to take their writing to another level both intellectually and artistically; depth of theme, imagination, and craft will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on developing and strengthening one’s personal style and voice. Through work-shopping, students will further refine their critical eye as poet and reader. The class will include exercises and readings. Submission of work will be discussed and encouraged.

Notes

Prerequisite WRTNG-UG 1560 or CRWRI-UA 817 or CRWRI-UA 830, or permission of the instructor. Students may take "Advanced Poetry Writing" two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1711 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

Politics, Writing and the Nobel Prize in Latin America

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Linn Cary Mehta

Syllabus

Description

In the course of the twentieth century, seven Latin American authors have won the Nobel Prize: Gabriela Mistral (1945); Miguel Angel Asturias (1967); Pablo Neruda (1971); Gabriel García Márquez (1982); Octavio Paz (1990); Rigoberto Menchú (Peace Prize, 1992); Mario Vargas Llosa (2010). Together, they give us a chance to consider some of the major literary and political movements in Latin America leading up to the present. Through novels and autobiography, Asturias and Menchú explore very different aspects of the indigenous struggle in Guatemala; the poetry of Mistral and Neruda reveals the successive influences of surrealism, communism, socialism, up to the eve of the Pinochet coup in Chile; the novels of García Márquez in Colombia and Vargas Llosa in Peru embody different sides of magical realism; and Paz, in Mexico, in his poetry and essays, represents a country that has been a literary cornerstone of Latin America. We will look at these authors in the context of the history, politics, and anthropology of their respective countries, and conclude by considering a few authors who did not get the prize but were equally deserving,such as Jorge Luis Borges and Roberto Bolaño.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1621 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Architectural Design and Drawing

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Donna Goodman

Syllabus

Description

This workshop introduces the basic process of creating an architectural design. It begins with an analysis of a building by an established architect. Through diagrams and drawings, issues of form, function, concept, and environment are presented. Visual systems of axis and proportions are also explored, as well as the use of light, color, materials, structure, and historical references. Students learn the visual language of architecture by drafting plans, sections, elevations, and renderings. In the second project, students design a loft space. They begin by creating a concept and program. Planning issues, such as function, circulation and spatial organization are discussed, as well as methods for evaluating a project. Designs are developed through perspectives and isometric images made in Sketchup or hand drawings. Films, lectures, and texts on design theory provide additional insights. Drafting experience is useful, but not required.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG404 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: Thinking and Writing Through New Media

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Paul Fess

Syllabus

Description

Our society has a complex relationship with technology, one that is persistent and evolving, beneficial and dangerous. Students in this course will work in small learning communities to investigate such technological issues as censorship and surveillance, the paradoxes of the synthetic, social media-driven life, and the affordances and pitfalls of technological developments. In pursuing these lines of inquiry, we will pay attention to how developments in writing technologies affect our writing processes, and by engaging in comparative media studies, we will use our own experience to understand and question historical information revolutions since the invention of the alphabet. As we examine these areas we will discuss the critical theory of Donna Haraway and N. Katherine Hayles along side new media theory critics like Johanna Drucker and Matthew Kirschenbaum. Readings may include:  Fahrenheit 451  by Ray Bradbury , Oryx and Crake  by Margaret Atwood ,  and  The Circle  by Dave Eggers .   Together, we will undertake a series of new media experiments, using digital tools to communicate our research to a public audience. On the course blog, students will analyze the digital objects on which they are dependent by applying the insights gained from engaging with the literary texts and theory. Students will express the results of their exploration in well-developed, thesis-driven, analytical essays accompanied by digital representations of their findings. During the semester you will design your own Word Press project, and in crafting your project you will engage various tools such as Zotero, Evernote, Diigo, and digital mapping applications.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1527 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Finance for Social Theorists

4 units Mon
7:45 PM - 10:15 PM
Peter Rajsingh

Description

Why are some private, profit-making institutions “too big to fail?” Where is the Shadow Banking System? What is Minsky moment? The objective of this course is to provide students with conceptual, interpretive and analytical tools to understand finance. The approach is interdisciplinary and interpretive, drawing upon political theory, economics, psychology, basic statistics and accounting. For example, we use the subprime crisis to explore core concepts associated with credit, banking, business ethics, monetary policy and macro economics. We reference key ideas from familiar texts and also take up contemporary debates in finance. The aim is to help students become more literate and numerate as economic and social agents. Readings include Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations (excerpts); John Stuart Mill, Principles of Political Economy (excerpts); Peter Bernstein, Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk and Nassim Taleb, Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in the Markets and in Life, as well as journal articles and pieces from the contemporary financial press. There is also an entrepreneurial team project.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1332 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Writing the Strange

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Victoria Blythe

Syllabus

Description

In this advanced writing class students approach writing from off-center, by taking an oblique perspective. We examine the attempts of such writers as Pound, Stein , Mallarme, Duras, Ponge and Robbes-Grillet to achieve originality by “making it new”, by “making it strange”, by defamiliarizing their subject matter. Our writing projects are situated at the intersection of the absurd and the surreal, and may incorporate techniques of other media such as the cubist/surrealist painters, the French graffiti artists, bricolage and the found-object. We risk nausea with Sartre and vertigo with the Vorticists. Students apply their exercises in the strange to “estranging” a work-in-progress as the culmination of the course. Theorists may include Deleuze, Guattari, Derrida and Baudrillard.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1534 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

The Seen and Unseen in Science

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Matthew Stanley

Syllabus

Description

This class explores how science and scientists work with the invisible, unseen, or unseeable elements of our world. We will examine how scientists convince themselves that these unseen things, such as atoms and molecules, are real. Many things cannot be seen or held in one’s hand, but scientists claim to have detected and to understand them. We ask probing questions about what it means to “see” or “observe” the world around us, and grapple with the basic question of how we gain scientific knowledge at all. Topics include telescopes and microscopes, atomic theory, the unconscious and psychoanalysis, human consciousness and intelligence, dark matter, and the nature of objectivity. We will pay special attention to how scientists are trained to see in particular ways, and how culture and worldview can shape, restrict, or enhance the way we observe. Readings include Galileo, Ernst Mach, Henry Adams, Stephen J. Gould, Peter Galison, T.S. Kuhn, Freud, Edward Tufte.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1570 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Writing for the Screen I

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Selma Thompson

Syllabus

Description

This workshop is for writers ready and willing to make the time commitment necessary to produce a well-structured outline and at least the first act of a feature-length screenplay (although students will be supported/encouraged to write a complete first draft, if possible). We will hone our craft through writing exercises, and through screenings of film scenes that illustrate aspects of dramatic writing. Attention will be paid to the fundamentals of drama, including dialogue, subtext, motivation and character-revealing action. The majority of our time will be spent presenting work and giving/receiving feedback; the ability to engage in collaborative discussion, and offer useful commentary, is an essential professional skill. Additionally, we will read/analyze recently produced screenplays to understand structure and how to make the story exciting “on the page”. Students should come to the class with some scriptwriting experience and/or a background in acting or film.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1775 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Contemporary Visual Culture and the Politics of Images

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Lauren Walsh

Description

In this course students learn to think about the reading and writing practices of contemporary visual culture. What does it mean to “read” an image? How are images used politically? Is what is “un-seen” as important as what is seen? Students tackle philosophical, ethical, and political questions, and are encouraged to pursue topics of individual interest for assigned papers and projects. We will ground our discussions in relevant theory and will explore all manner of visual genres, including the graphic novel form, film, magazine ads, and photography. In examining the politics of visual images, this course places special, extended emphasis on images in the context of war and humanitarian crises. Throughout, we will think about our own roles in contemporary visual culture; we are consumers, participators, and creators, and sometimes we have no power over images. What does this mean for us when considered through, for example, an ethical or aesthetic or humanitarian lens? Critical literature by Susan Sontag, Susie Linfield, Scott McCloud, and Marita Sturken, among others, will inform our discussions and deepen student writing. Our syllabus also includes journalistic accounts and war photography, as well as at least one piece by the writer and documentary filmmaker Errol Morris. Students will write reaction papers, longer essays, and have the option of a visual project.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG74 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Collective Memory of Atrocity and Crisis

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Hannah Gurman

Syllabus

Description

In the aftermath of the Holocaust, Primo Levi wrote, “Never forget that this has happened.” Levi’s imperative raises important questions about the role of memory in the aftermath of atrocity and crisis. What is the difference between individual and collective memory? What is the purpose of remembering atrocity? What is the relationship between memory and justice? What gets forgotten in the collective memory and why? How might the memory of everyday crisis and long-term conflict figure into this framework? We will pursue such questions by examining specific genres and forms of collective memory that have contributed to understandings of atrocity and crisis in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in particular. We will consider how tribunals, memorials, archives, novels, and film have shaped, challenged, and revised the politics of remembering and forgetting contemporary atrocity and crisis. In addition to informal response papers, students will write 3 formal essays over the course of the semester. Readings may include works by Maurice Halbwachs, Karl Jaspers, Hannah Arendt, Maya Lin, and Toni Morrison.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

WRTNG-UG1548 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Pitch Perfect: A Multi-genre Writing Workshop

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Meera Nair

Syllabus

Description

Voice is the first thing we encounter in compelling writing. Voice is the palpable presence of the writer, the hand that reaches out to pull us in. It is writer’s persona, the sound of his or her presence. Voice is what persists, whispering in our head, long after the essayist's convictions are aired, long after we have closed the book, or closed the browser. This multigenre writing workshop will help hone an essential and potent element of your writing: an ability to adapt your voice to the medium. Whether it is the rigor of short fiction, the convictions of the personal essay or the quick musings of a blog, we will explore different ways to develop your voice. We will close-read published stories, essays, blogs as a starting point for your own writing. We will explore aspects of craft: point of view, character, theme, rhythm, structure and so on. We will burnish each other’s work with frank and constructive comment and grapple with the rigors of editing. The course will require close-readings of fiction by Kafka, Cortazar, Ha Jin, Lahiri, Oates, personal essays by Hemon, Dillard, Jo Ann Beard, Shteyngart and other writers. We will also study blogs like ze frank, Learningtoloveyoumore by Miranda July. In addition to writing fiction and essay and studying aspects of craft, students will also design and create website content and make presentations.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

ELEC-GG2648 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Media Historiography

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Moya Luckett

Syllabus

Description

This course explores both theories and practices of media history and analyzes how media more generally contribute to the writing of history. We consider how media’s ability to document the present—both in fiction and non-fiction—provides an archive of the recent past, in turn presenting the illusion of a more complete popular memory of the last century or so. In addition to parsing the relationship between history, the past, and mass media, we consider the stakes of writing media history more broadly. What factors do we need to consider in writing about the past and how do we treat the materials that we use in our enquiries? As the media’s complexity and its own diverse stakes shape its history, we explore divisions between social, aesthetic, cultural and technological media histories and the more business-minded institutional and economic studies. In examining the materials used to write media histories—primary and secondary sources, archival records, trade and fan press, promotional materials and social documents—we think about the problems of asserting truth, both on screens and the printed page. We also consider the particular difficulties and significance of writing the history of popular media, especially given their seductive, if often false, claims to "reality." Readings include selections from Gitelman,  Always Already New: Media, History and the Data of Culture ; Rosen,  Change Mummified: Cinema, Historicity, Theory ; Lewis and Smoodin,  Looking Past the Screen: Case Studies in American Film History and Method ; and Carr,  What Is History ?

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (moya.luckett@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

FIRST-UG32 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: The Social Construction of Reality

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Stephen Duncombe

Syllabus

Description

How do we know what is real and what is illusion? From the philosophy of the ancient Greeks to contemporary movies such as The Matrix, this question has haunted humankind. This course begins with the premise that "the real" is something we construct. We create reality through the stories we tell and the stories told to us. Since the most powerful storytellers today are the commercial media, we will pay special attention to the role of entertainment, advertising, and public relations in constructing our reality. Texts for the course include works by Plato, Rene Descartes, W.E.B. Du Bois, Maxine Hong Kingston, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Herman Melville, Walter Lippmann, Jean Baudrillard, Slavoj Zizek, Judith Butler, Jonathan Lear and John Berger.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1849 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Black Lives Matter: Race, Resistance and Popular Protest

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Frank Roberts

Syllabus

Description

The age of the Obama Presidency has been plagued by a number of highly publicized police cases involving the shooting of unarmed black citizens at the hands of law enforcement and/or local vigilantes. In the wake of the deaths of Michael Brown, Vonderrick Myers, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, 7-year-old Aiyana Stanley-Jones, and others, the recent #blacklivesmatter movement has emerged largely in response to histories of state sanctioned violence against black and brown bodies. This seminar links the #blacklivesmatter” movement to four broader phenomena: 1) the rise of the U.S. prison industrial complex and the increasing militarization of inner city communities, 2) the role of media in influencing national conversations about race and racism, 3) the state of racial justice activism in the purportedly “post-racial” Obama Presidency, and 4) the increasingly populist nature of decentralized protest movements in the U.S. We will debate and engage with a variety of topics, including the moral ethics of “looting” and riotous forms of protest; violent vs. nonviolent civil disobedience; the media myth of “black on black” crime; coalitional politics and the black feminist and LGBTQ underpinnings of the #blacklivesmatter movement; comparisons between the blacklivesmatter movement and the U.S. civil rights movement; and the dynamics of political protest among the millennial and post-millennial generations. Readings will likely include writings by Cornel West, Michelle Alexander, James Cone, Osaygefo Sekou, Imani Perry, Frederick Harris. Our reading material will also be supplemented by guest speakers and media activists who have played prominent roles in the blacklivesmatter movement.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Independent Study

4 units

Description

In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student’s work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is September 8. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

SASEM-UG9400 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

PRAGUE: Modern Dissent in Central Europe: The Art of Defeat

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. Totalitarian ideologies which were used in European political discourse in the twentieth century to explain major historical changes have changed forever the relationship between the state and its citizens. The aspiration of the totalitarian state to acquire total control over individual lives through control of education, employment and health systems succeeded beyond anything perceived possible until then in any political regime after European Enlightenment. Nazism and Communism mobilized irrationally motivated mass support and won power in a very short time. Their success was partially based on a mass propaganda, using fear as primary instinctive argument against a picture of both external and internal enemies. The major focus of the course will be oriented towards topics trying to explain the reasons for mass support for totalitarian ideologies and states on the basis of individual psychology. We will examine psychological explanations of a selfvictimisation, role of a victim and a perpetrator, majority society response to mass human rights abuses and the abusive past. On this background a phenomenon of a political and cultural dissent will be introduced and discussed. The role of electronic mass media, antiglobalisation movements and global terrorism are discussed as possible modern vehicles of totalitarian tendencies and reactions against them

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1854 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

Architecture and the Modern

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Anooradha Siddiqi

Description

This course examines a global framework for “the modern,” using architecture and urbanism as concrete objects for the study of this contentious category in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The theory and practice of architecture and urbanism embody and yet contest the universalizing aspirations of concepts of modernism, modernization, and modernity, as highly specific cultural, political, social, and technological enterprises. Taking as a premise that architecture is a site and subject for critical inquiry, what does it tell us about modernities, globalization, and politics, as well as history, theory, and criticism as epistemological approaches? In addition to a range of cultural theorists and historians of architecture and urbanism, students will be introduced to a critical selection of architects and architectural voices from the past and present, each with some stake in (or counter-claim against) the “modern,” including practitioners, critics, and institutions—from Le Corbusier to Rem Koolhaas, Reyner Banham to Manfredo Tafuri, the Bauhaus to the Rural Studio, and the Museum of Modern Art to the City of New York. We will engage architectural concepts and designs by learning to critically read and assess drawings and buildings closely within their historical contexts, drawing on designs, built artifacts, journals, books, films, and web-based materials. The class will also visit significant local works, archives, and institutions.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9050 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

ACCRA: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-ACCRA. This course consists of an agency-based internship and a campus-based seminar at the academic center that allows students to integrate theory and practice skills gained from academic course work with authentic fieldwork experiences. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analystically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

FIRST-UG361 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: Collage: From Art to Life and Back

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Eugene Vydrin

Syllabus

Description

This writing seminar will explore the implications of making the new from the ready-made, of constructing one’s own from what was—and remains—somebody else's. Collage aims at reintegrating art and life, so we will examine collage works that comment on existing society, critique its values and forms of representation and demand their revision. By selecting heterogeneous elements from remote areas of culture, high and low, and juxtaposing them on a single plane, collage disrupts conventional associations and traditional narratives, collapses oppositions, scrambles classifications, and levels hierarchies. What new meanings do the fragments and quotations acquire from these radical juxtapositions, and how does their assemblage contest the mythologies of the culture from which they were taken? The class will consist of several case studies in verbal and visual collage placed in relation to a set of political and aesthetic ideas, which we will derive from a series of theoretical texts. Theorists may include Roland Barthes, Viktor Shklovsky, John Berger, Dawn Ades, Peter Bürger, Marjorie Perloff, and Dick Hebdige. Collages may include poetry by T. S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, and Susan Howe, as well as artworks by Pablo Picasso, Fernand Léger, Hannah Höch, Romare Bearden, and Robert Rauschenberg.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

INDIV-UG9151 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

BUENOS AIRES: Great World Texts

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. This tutorial connects NYU students with students at Lenguas Vivas, a vibrant public high school in Buenos Aires' Retiro neighborhood. NYU students will mentor high school seniors as they read, discuss and write about a well-known literary text. Conducted in English.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1682 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

Thinking Sex/Gender Globally

4 units Tue
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Ritty Lukose

Syllabus

Description

This interdisciplinary seminar explores how gender and sexuality simultaneously produce and is produced by global, transnational and international visions. For example, the project of identifying affinities between women across cultures and national boundaries has long grounded the work of feminist movements, scholars, journalists, institutions and activists in a variety of locations, both within and outside the Euro-American context. More recently, struggles for the rights of sexual minorities have become increasingly transnational. We explore such efforts to forge enabling alliances and solidarities. We also critically examine how such efforts navigate cultural and national differences, hierarchies within a global world order and complex histories of imperialism, paying attention to the different locations through which such projects intersect with the global. The course highlights the rise of a new post-war international order centered in the UN system, exploring the links between colonial legacies and new global trajectories. How and why are women and girls, gender and sexuality so central to this system? By examining development initiatives that target women and girls, anti-violence and anti-trafficking campaigns, and the rights of sexual minorities, we explore how gender and sexuality become grounds for debating global, transnational and international visions and frameworks that, in turn, shape feminist and queer politics in different locales. Readings include Antoinette Burton,  Burdens of History: British Feminists, Indian Women and Imperial Culture , Kumari Jayawardena's  Feminism and Nationalism in the Third World ,  Specters of Mother India: The Global Restructuring of an Empire  by Mrinalini Sinha ,  Afsaneh Najmabadi's  Women with Mustaches and Men Without Beards ,  Are Women Human?  by Catherine MacKinnon,  Transnational LGBT Activism: Working for Sexual Rights Worldwide  by Ryan Thoreson and  Queer Activism in India: A Story in the Anthropology of Ethics  by Naisargi Dave .  

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 721.003.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1325 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Songwriting

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bill Rayner

Syllabus

Description

Song is the oldest musical form established in all eras and cultures. Ancient Greek and African musicians used song for recreation, to preserve communal memory and to link the visible world with the invisible. Music making was rooted in mythology, legends and folklore and was associated with gods, ancestors and heroes. The musician, through his/her technique, had to be able to combine sounds and images through the use of voice, gesture, dance, and instruments to form a musical reminiscence. In this workshop, songwriting will be explored as both a musical and cultural practice. Each student will develop songwriting techniques through the study of historical, cultural and musical aspects of songwriting.

Notes

Lab fee: $35. Course meets at Drummer's Collective, 541 Avenue of The Americas (btwn. 14th & 15th Sts.)

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

PRACT-UG1301 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Practicum in Fashion Business

4 units Mon
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Harold Brooks, Lise Friedman

Syllabus

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/fashion-practicum.html Description: The fashion industry’s need to balance the conflicting demands of specialization and globalization requires innovative approaches that connect creativity, design and business. This course considers the dialogue surrounding ways the fashion business can meet these demands by linking aesthetic goals to financial plans. The course is designed to provide students interested in the fashion industry with an opportunity to develop their understanding of various approaches to bridging the gap between design and business. The course will combine hands-on group projects and case studies with interdisciplinary readings in business and design history, consumerism, merchandizing and the business of fashion. The course will be taught by the Guess Distinguished Visiting Professor in Fashion and Fashion Business, and by a member of the Gallatin faculty. Admission is by permission of the Visiting Professor.

Notes

Permission required. Application deadline: April 10, 5:00pm. For more information and to apply, please click on course title and then link to application.

Type

Practicum (PRACT-UG)

FIRST-UG402 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: Gimme Shelter: Dwelling and Telling in the City

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Krystyna Michael

Description

Advice manuals popular in the mid-nineteenth-century illustrate a long held anxiety about the urban landscape. The assumption was that the city was rife with “confidence men” and “painted women” who sought not only to swindle newcomers but also to recruit them into their nefarious fold. The city was thus imagined as a mercurial landscape of shifting forms and deceptive appearances unfit for wholesome living. This course explores the history and changing shape of ideas about dwelling in the American city. From the mid-nineteenth century guidebooks to the design section of New York Magazine, from Walt Whitman’s poetry to hashtags and twitter feeds—we will examine how Americans have made themselves physically and imaginatively at home in the city. Writers we will consider include Edith Wharton, Joan Didion, Marshall Berman, Martin Heidegger and Walter Benjamin. We will look at the design work of Frederick Law Olmstead and Robert Moses, and photography of the urban landscape. Music by Radiohead, the Rolling Stones and from the Harlem Renaissance as well as the films of Charlie Kaufman will help us think about the ways different mediums capture, reflect and shape the urban experience and what kinds of obstacles—psychological, social and class-based—the city poses for the activity of dwelling. Students will contribute to a course blog, write two short papers and collaborate using Rap Genius to research their final papers on music and living in the city.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

SASEM-UG9150 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

BUENOS AIRES: Tango and Mass Culture (in Spanish)

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. This course explores Tango as an aesthetic, social and cultural formation that is articulated in interesting and complex ways with the traditions of culture and politics in Argentina and Latin America more generally. During the rapid modernization of the 1920s and 1930s, Tango (like Brazilian Samba), which had been seen as a primitive and exotic dance, began to emerge as a kind of modern primative art form that quickly came to occupy a central space in nationalist discourse. The course explores the way that perceptions of a primative and a modern converge in this unique and exciting art. In addition, the course will consider tango as a global metaphor with deeply embedded connections to urban poverty, social marginalization, and masculine authority.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1603 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Modern Poetry and the Actual World

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Lisa Goldfarb

Syllabus

Description

Although lyric poetry is the art of language that we reserve for the expression of the emotional dimension of our human experience, lyric poets also importantly use the forms and conventions of their art to respond to the shape and substance of the world they inhabit; that is, the historical, political, and physical aspects of the world—the “actual world”—in which they live. This course has two principal aims: first, to help us to develop skills in the reading of lyric poetry, and, second, to consider the complex relation between lyric poetry and the actual world. In the first half of the class, we will study the forms and conventions of lyric poetry and work on developing our poetic sensibilities. In the second half, we will focus our attention on the relationship of modern poets to the concrete or actual world and focus our study on W.H. Auden and Wallace Stevens, two poets who address the pressing questions of their day, and the world they shared, in strikingly different ways. Yet, however different their approaches, both poets ponder questions of faith and secularity, consider heroism and loss in a century marked by war, and probe our human relationship to nature in answer to an increasingly industrialized and technological world. Readings will include texts that consider how to read lyric poetry (Hirsch, Vendler, Perloff), a representative selection of modern lyric poetry (Eliot, Pound, Valéry, Éluard, Apollinaire, Moore, H.D., Bishop, Hughes, Brooks, Rich), the works of Auden and Stevens (essays and poems), as well as the philosophical, historical and political narratives to which they refer and that inform their work (Freud, Nietzsche, William James, Santayana).

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9550 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

TEL AVIV: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-TEL AVIV. This course consists of an agency-based internship and a campus-based seminar at the academic center that allows students to integrate theory and practice skills gained from academic course work with authentic fieldwork experiences. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analystically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1640 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or EARLY
FA 2015

The History of Kindness

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Andrew Romig

Description

How have human beings conceived and represented benevolent behavior toward others differently across time and place? In this course, we will explore the history of the concepts, ideals, and behaviors that we associate with the modern English word, "kindness" -- a story that begins in the classical world and unfolds slowly through two millennia into the present day. We will connect ancient debates about human nature, the practice of justice, and moral responsibility, to recent studies concerning the evolutionary biology of altruism (is there a "kindness gene"?), sociological studies of gender difference (is hostility a male trait?), and anthropological studies of how culture regulates conduct. We will study the rise of state-sponsored morality and the ways in which ideals of social welfare have changed over time. Key texts will include Plato's Republic, The Gospel of Matthew, Augustine's City of God, Dhuoda's handbook for her son, Chaucer's Tale of Melibee, Voltaire's Treatise on Tolerance, and Ghandi's The Story of My Experiments with Truth. As part of the course, students will also conduct individual studies of how "kindness" is defined, enacted, and organized throughout the New York metropolitan area today, with the opportunity to combine research with internship work.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1470 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

The Public Square: From Concepts--to Models--to Monuments

4 units Mon
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Greg Wyatt

Syllabus

Description

This workshop focuses on the nature of creativity for the public space and the “model to monument” design and bronze casting. We will explores the process by which a concept becomes a three dimensional model and consequently a public monument. We will also investigate how ideas, or concepts in history have influenced individual artist in making public monuments. Some examples of this type of didactic art that we will explore are: Perikles’ Athenian building program after the Persian wars, Michelangelo’s David, the Columbia University “Alma Mater” in the middle of Columbia’s campus, the Peace Fountain next to St. John the Divine, Ghandi’s bronze on Union Square, Grand Army Plaza, “Sherman Memorial,” Avenue of Americas “Liberators Monuments,” Central Park “Literary Walk-Shakespeare” and “Angel of the Waters” and other sculptures and architectural sights in New York City. In addition to visiting most of the above New York City’s public monuments, each student in the class will adopt-a-monument that is in a decaying state and develop plans to restore it or study the possibilities to prevent it from further decay. Some sessions of this workshop will be conducted at the Art Students League with visits to the Queens Modern Art Foundry. Readings may include Plato’s Timaeus, Benvenuto Cellini’s Autobiography, Cezanne’s Letters, Delacroix’s Jounal, as well as Goethe and Leonardo on painting.

Notes

Students should not schedule any classes immediately before or after this class to allow ample time to travel to off-site locations, as well as to the Modern Art Foundry and the Art Students League. Students are expected to pay for their own travel expenses.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1294 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Philosophy of Medicine

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bradley Lewis

Syllabus

Description

Most medical inquiry focuses on narrow issues of disease from within a biomedical framework. It rarely steps back from the particulars to ask larger philosophic questions regarding the goals of medicine and healthcare. In this class we take the opposite strategy to focus on the larger theoretical and philosophical issues in U.S. healthcare. We unpack the underlying concepts and principles that organize contemporary medical research, practice, and education. We look at the strengths and weaknesses of today’s dominant models of medicine and we consider the possibilities of alternative conceptual frames. Plus, we consider how much of the administrative and financial problems of today’s healthcare crisis can be explained by conceptual and philosophical issues. Our inquiry will be an interdisciplinary approach that draws from medicine, philosophy, history, anthropology, sociology, gender studies, disability studies, cultural studies, poetry, drama, and documentary.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1300 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Militaries and Militarization

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Antonio Lauria-Perricelli

Syllabus

Description

What are the effects of a large, permanent military upon the political economy and society of the United States? What are the effects on other countries of their militaries? What are the effects on local societies of US military bases? What is the role of the various militaries in the history of colonial/neo-colonial control, and in contemporary empire? How are military establishments and violence linked to ethno-national, class and other social movements—and to the repression and domination of such movements? What does a military do to/for the people who staff it? What are the implications of militarization in such areas as gender, human rights, the environment, sports, knowledge and learning? What is the role of militias, “para-militaries”, and guerrillas? What methods can social or popular movements use in their attempts to subvert, paralyze, eliminate or otherwise struggle against militaries, military bases, and weapons? Texts may include: Lutz,  Homefront: A Military City and the American Twentieth Century ; Enloe,  Maneuvers: The International Politics of Militarizing Women’s Lives ; McCaffrey,  Military Power and Popular Protest: The U.S. Navy in Vieques, Puerto Rico ; and Green,  Fear as a Way of Life .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9250 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

LONDON: Immigration

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG93 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: The Politics of Home

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Rosanne Kennedy

Syllabus

Description

The premise of this seminar is that the “home” is not prepolitical or apolitical, in opposition to the public domain, but inextricably linked to the political. Indeed meanings of home saturate – sometimes explicitly, sometimes obliquely – our public discourse and debates. Gender, race, class, and sexuality are publically policed and reproduced with reference to normative familial relations and (private) property. Yet domestic spaces and intimate lives can often serve as spaces of relief, refuge, and even political opposition. The home, depending on where one finds oneself situated, can mean wildly different things: prison or refuge, the banal or the aspirational. In this course we will read critiques and adulations of the domestic in multiple genres (theoretical, literary, popular) alongside contemporary activist projects and artworks that willfully put the domestic on public display through the use of traditional women’s work (knitting, embroidery, sewing). We will ask how different domestic spaces and intimate relations are imagined in opposition (or conjunction) with dominant models. Readings will include Charlotte Gilman Perkins, Betty Friedan, Toni Morrison, bell hooks, Kathleen Stewart, Ann Cvetkovich, David Eng, Juana Maria Rodriguez, and Foucault and artworks by Annette Messager, Marianne Jørgensen, and the Gees Bend Quilters.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

FIRST-UG365 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Writing Seminar: The Idea of America: What Does it Mean?

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Hannah Gurman

Syllabus

Description

This class will examine “America” as a complex, historically-rooted, and malleable idea, which writers, social scientists, politicians, and the state have shaped, changed, and critiqued to fit their own contexts and purposes. We will explore the historical roots and shifting conceptions of the idea of America through analysis of political treatises, poetry, essays, and official government documents from the pre-colonial period to the present. Approaching “America” as both a nation-state and an empire, and considering how it has been imagined by those within as well as outside its borders, we will analyze the idea of America not only in the context of life in the United States, but also in the context of global development, environmental crises, and American foreign policy. Students will write informal response papers as preparation for drafting and revising 3 essays over the course of the semester, including a literary critical essay. Texts will include works by John Locke, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Jose Martí, Henry Luce, Eugene Burdick, and Naomi Klein, as well as official documents of U.S. Policy.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Writing Seminars (FIRST-UG)

FIRST-UG86 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Place and Behavior

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Meredith Theeman

Description

This course will focus on the intersections between behavior, place and space. How do the spaces we inhabit influence our lived experience? At first we will construct working definitions of "environment" and learn about the ways in which various environments can impact our behavior, beliefs, and feelings. Then we will discuss what it means to inhabit specific kinds of places: natural and constructed, wild and urban, public and private, familiar and novel. This class will examine questions related to the natural and built environments by incorporating the theoretical perspectives and research methodologies of ecology, geography, psychology, and sociology. Topics may include attachment to place, the concept of "home", environmental values, institutional spaces (e.g., schools, and hospitals), New Environmental Paradigm, privacy, pro-environmental behavior, psychological well-being, restoration and wayfinding. Readings may include: St. Francis D'Assisi, Michel de Certeau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Hippocrates, Jane Jacobs, Henry David Thoreau and Edward O. Wilson.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

FIRST-UG70 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Holy Grails

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Andrew Romig

Description

The Quest for the Holy Grail has captured the modern Western imagination, spawning bestselling fiction, scholarly and conspiratorial study, and no fewer than fourteen feature films dating back to the silent era. Yet our twentieth-century fascination with the legendary Cup is only the most recent incarnation of a long obsession in popular Western culture—an obsession that reaches back in time to at least the twelfth century, and possibly earlier still. In this course, the legend of the Holy Grail will serve as a case study for learning about the Middle Ages and medievalism in our world today. We will study the flourishing of the Grail legend in medieval courtly society, but we will think about other “Grails” as well: quests for the unknown, the unseen, and the unconquered; fascination with conspiracy; and above all, the hope that human beings invest in symbols, not just of the divine, but also of transcendent kindness, compassion, and sacrifice. Readings will include  Beowulf , the  Perceval  legends of Chrétien de Troyes and Wolfram von Eschenbach, Robert de Boron’s  Merlin , and Thomas Malory’s  Le Morte d’Arthur.  We will examine our modern associations of the Grail legend with Christian femininity, the Knights Templar, the Papacy, and Leonardo da Vinci. And in dialogue with theorists of anthropology, political science, psychology, and comparative mythology, we will discuss why we pursue holy grails in the first place—what keeps us striving for those tantalizing, ultimately unreachable goals that nevertheless compel us ever forward.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Interdisciplinary Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1065 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Performing Comedy

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Matthew Gregory

Description

This course explores the practices, principles and aesthetics of comedic performance. Questions examined include: What makes something funny? Why do audiences laugh? What is the relationship between performer and audience in comedy? How does a performer get the laugh without ‘asking’ for it? How is humor specific to certain cultures, historical periods, genders or age groups? Are any elements of humor universal? Does the nature of performing comedy change from medium to medium? The course investigates these questions through readings, lectures, discussion and experiential exercises. Students are challenged to synthesize theory, historical traditions, and practical application into viable comedic performances. Students will experiment with this synthesis through discussing, analyzing, rehearsing and performing scenes/monologues drawn from major comic traditions including: masked forms (such as Greek Old Comedy and Commedia dell’Arte), high comedy (like the comedies of Shakespeare and Moliere), low comedy (such as the slapstick of Charlie Chaplin, Mel Brooks, as well as modern sketch, improv and stand-up comedy) and that which defies easy categorization (such as Monty Python or Sacha Baron Cohen). The course will culminate in a public presentation, allowing students to share select comedic performances with an audience. Students are expected to rehearse outside of class time.

Notes

Permission of the instructor required (mag19@nyu.edu).

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG802 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Transfer Student Research Seminar: Coming Home: Identity and Place

4 units Tue Thu
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Jennifer Lemberg

Syllabus

Description

Historian Eric Hobsbawm famously refers to the twentieth century as “the age of extremes,” an era of violence marked especially by “the destruction of the past.” In response to this perceived break with history, contemporary narratives seek to recover lost pasts, employing tropes of homecoming and return in order to bridge temporal as well as geographical gaps. Stories of “coming home” document the urgency with which our culture attempts to remember the past in the aftermath of trauma and invests specific places, or “sites of memory,” with the power of recall. This course investigates the linkages between identity and place as they are imagined in the aftermath of historical traumas, in film, literature, and theory as well as practices including reparations and genealogy. The ways in which contemporary narratives treat the theme of coming home across boundaries of time and space and the role this idea plays in the construction of ethnic, racial, and national identities will serve as the impetus for frequent exploratory writing, formal essays, and a research paper. Texts will include readings in trauma theory and memory studies as well as selections from Louise Erdrich, Tim O’Brien, Toni Morrison, Jonathan Safran Foer, and James Young, among others.

Notes

Open to Gallatin transfer students only. Permission required. To register, please contact Gallatin’s Transfer Student Class Adviser, Joshua Shirkey (joshua.shirkey@nyu.edu).

Type

First-Year Program: Transfer Student Research Seminar (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1833 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Music and Science

2 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Myles Jackson

Syllabus

Description

Music and science seem to be two different disciplines, a classic example of C. P. Snow’s two cultures. Upon closer inspection, however, the two have historically enjoyed a very close and mutually fruitful interaction. This course is dedicated to unearthing the intricate and historically contingent relationships between the two fields from the eighteenth century to the present. Given such a rich history, we shall limit ourselves to an analysis based on material culture. Specifically, we shall focus on how physicists and engineers provided musicians with new forms of aesthetic expression, such as the ability to increase in volume without increasing in pitch, or the use of electricity to generate sounds and tones never heard before. We shall also consider how music provided scientists and engineers with experimental resources to test natural phenomena, such as the testing of adiabatic phenomena and work relevant to the creation of the theory of thermodynamics. Texts include those of Pesic, Voskuhl, Jackson, and Pinch and Trocco.

Notes

Course meets last seven weeks,10/28 - 12/14.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG1925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include "Creating a Magazine," "Dante's Literary and Historical Background," and "Environmental Design." Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is May 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include “Creating a Magazine,” “Dante’s Literary and Historical Background,” and “Environmental Design.” Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Deadline for submitting proposal is May 1. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

IDSEM-UG9351 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

PARIS: Cultures & Contexts: Multiculturalism in France

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PARIS. France and the U.S. have a habit of looking at one another as anti-models when it comes to discussions of assimilation and difference, “race,” identity, community and diversity. In this course, we explore this comparison as a productive means for re-considering these terms. Why is the notion of “ethnic community” so problematic in France? And why do Americans insist on the “homogeneity” of the French nation, even as, at various points throughout modern French history, France has received more immigrants to its shores than the United States? Through readings, film screenings, and site visits we explore the movements and encounters that have made Paris a rich, and sometimes controversial, site of cultural exchange. Topics include contemporary polemics on questions such as headscarves, the banlieue, the new Paris museums of immigration and “primitive” art, affirmative action and discrimination positive, historic expressions of exoticism, négritude, and anti-colonialism. Occasional case studies drawn from the American context help provide a comparative framework for these ideas. Conducted in English.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG9150 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

BUENOS AIRES: Creative Writing: Argentina, Travel Writing at the End of the World

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. A practical course in the writing of creative literary texts: prose (short stories as well as literary non-fiction) and poetry. Selected published works will be analyzed in class both to provide inspiration for student writing as well as to represent literary structures and strategies. Writing assignments ranging from spontaneous to long-term projects will promote creative exploration and self-expression. Critical skills are emphasized and enhanced as students respond to each others’ work. Awareness of correct conventional use of the English language will be upheld. Students build up a body of work over the semester. For full credit and in demonstration of a writing “process,” the final portfolios should include both first drafts and subsequent revisions. At least one longer text (or set of poems) will be selected for submission as would be appropriate to publishers or literary contests.

Type

Global Programs (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1750 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Good Design: Scale

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Louise Harpman

Description

Good Design takes as its premise that visual literacy is a vital yet under-examined area of academic discourse. Although we engage the designed environment every day, non-specialists have few ways to make sense of the myriad decisions that come together to form things and places. Through a combination of reading, drawing, writing, and model-making, this course asks students to examine the complex intersections between analyzing existing designs and creating new work. One central question is whether design principles that operate at a small scale, say the scale of a hand-held object, are also appropriate at a larger scale, like the scale of human habitation. The course uses scale as a lens through which to engage this question, as readings and projects consider the design of something you can hold (such as a tool), the design of something that can hold the body (such as clothing or furniture), and something that can be inhabited (such as a dwelling). Discussions of the readings, analytic writing, and presentation of student-designed work will structure the majority of course meetings. Authors will include: Edgar Kaufmann, Jr. and the original Museum of Modern Art curatorial Good Design texts from the 1950s; Paola Antonelli, Humble Masterpieces: Everyday Marvels of Design; Pietra Rivoli, The Travels of a T-shirt in the Global Economy; Jay Greene, Design is How It Works; Richard Dyer, White. Field trips to MoMA and other design museums are scheduled.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1619 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

Architecture and Urban Design Lab I

6 units Mon
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM Mon
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Mitchell Joachim

Syllabus

Description

This workshop and design lab aims to impart skills and theories essential to intelligent green design, an socio-ecological practice applicable to all materials, buildings, and infrastructure systems. The course will look broadly at types of inhabitation, including hives, webs, nests, and lodges; houses, housing, cities, and regions; and extreme environments including emergency shelters and outer-space habitats. Our objectives are grounded in understanding the architectural consequences of socially responsible and community based endeavors in urban areas. As a project-based course, students will work individually and in teams and will combine original research with design proposals. Intellectual design exercises in the beginning of the semester will prepare students for an intense focus on a current problem facing New York City. Students will be expected to present their ideas in mock-ups, scaled models, schematics, lifestyle drawings, and other forms of imaging. Thus, as they create and develop their own original design proposals, students will experiment with a variety of techniques and forms of representation. Authors may include William J. Mitchell, Mohsen Mostafavi, Alex Krieger, Elizabeth Diller, Michelle Addington, William McDonough, Ricky Burdett, Sanford Kwinter, Ernst Haeckl, James Corner, Victor Papanek, Stan Allen, Charles Waldheim and others.

Notes

6 units. This course is repeatable, however please note the following limitation: students may take either ARTS-UG 1619 or ARTS-UG 1614 two times, OR they may take both ARTS-UG 1619 and ARTS-UG 1614 one time each. Students are responsible for purchasing their own project materials, as well as paying for a portion of printing expenses.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

SASEM-UG9151 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
FA 2015

BUENOS AIRES: Myths, Icons, and Invented Traditions: A Cultural History of Latin America

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. Mitos, íconos y tradiciones inventadas is an advanced conversation course, which seeks to make students familiar with the rich and complex history of Latin America through the study of some of its most known and iconic cultural expressions. It does also work as an introductory map to the most influential and widespread approaches in Latin American social sciences, cultural studies and literary criticism. Thus, students will not only have a first encounter with key historical processes that lie behind some well know cultural icons, but also will be introduced to arguments and ways of writing that help constitute modern Latin American educated Spanish. The course will be structured in seven topics; each topic will be covered in two weeks. During these four classes, students will be exposed to different kinds of cultural materials, including literary texts, film, papers from several disciplines, theater plays, art shows and live concerts.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9600 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

WASHINGTON, DC: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. This course consists of an agency-based internship and a campus-based seminar at the academic center that allows students to integrate theory and practice skills gained from academic course work with authentic fieldwork experiences. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analystically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)