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Found 3938 courses
K55.9500 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2008

Berlin: Capital of Modernity

4 units

Description

Some of the most thrilling, momentous, and terrible events of the 1900's occurred in Berlin, and today its streets, buildings, and cultural monuments offer tales of warning and inspiration to the present century. This three-week course will take in many of the sights and sounds of old and contemporary Berlin, but our course will focus on the involvement of twentieth-century, Berlin-based politicians, activists, artists, architects, bohemians, writers, and intellectuals with the causes, experience, and consequences of World War II. Berlin's streets, buildings, memorials, and cultural monuments offer cautionary tales about the folly of nationalist ambition; inspiring sagas of intellectual and physical courage; cold testimonials of crime and retribution; lyrical ballads of brutal honesty; personal records of hope and despair. From one perspective, all of these narratives are episodes in an epic whose grand and central scene is World War II—and that is the point of view to be adopted in this interdisciplinary seminar set in Berlin. Our period of study begins just before the outbreak of World War I and ends during the astonishing building boom of the post-Wall 1990's and early 2000's. Group site visits occur throughout the week and on weekends, but students will be given ample opportunity to explore Berlin and develop their own individual projects. Field trips encompass the rich resources of the city's museums, neighborhoods, historical sites, memorials and cultural monuments. Classes, taught in English, meet four days a week.

Notes

Course meets in Berlin, June 26-July17.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

K95.2060 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2008

Italian Renaissance, Art and Literature: The Culture Explosion

4 units

Description

Course meets in Florence, June 5-26. Graduate course open to undergraduates. Many of our modern ideas about art, literature, architecture and its uses, politics, culture, philosophy, gender and class derive from the vibrant and prolific period of the Renaissance. During a three-week, interdisciplinary program in the beautiful and historic Florence, Italy, students are offered a total immersion and multifaceted learning experience that is an essential beginning to understanding our modern world through the lens of the Italian Renaissance. This course explores the literature, culture, art, and thought of the Renaissance from multiple perspectives. During their stay, students will develop and present an individualized project based on their academic interests and background, and the ways in which they have been inspired by the Renaissance. As a quintessential Gallatin experience, the course places emphasis on the cultural and historical contexts from which the literature and art of Renaissance Florence emerged. Students study the art of Florentine painters such as Botticelli, Giotto, and Michelangelo in the places where these works were created. Readings might include the works of Dante, Pico Della Mirandola, Machiavelli, and selected female writers, as well as art texts such as Vasari's The Lives of the Artists. Classes, which are taught in English, meet four days a week. Throughout the course, students will visit such museums and churches as the Uffizi, The Duomo, the church of Santa Maria Novella, and the monastery of San Marco to engage fully with the art and architecture of Renaissance Italy.

Notes

Graduate course open to undergraduate students.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

K95.2060 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2005

Italian Renaissance, Art and Literature: The Culture Explosion

4 units

Description

Course meets in Florence, June 5-26. Graduate course open to undergraduates. Many of our modern ideas about art, literature, architecture and its uses, politics, culture, philosophy, gender and class derive from the vibrant and prolific period of the Renaissance. During a three-week, interdisciplinary program in the beautiful and historic Florence, Italy, students are offered a total immersion and multifaceted learning experience that is an essential beginning to understanding our modern world through the lens of the Italian Renaissance. This course explores the literature, culture, art, and thought of the Renaissance from multiple perspectives. During their stay, students will develop and present an individualized project based on their academic interests and background, and the ways in which they have been inspired by the Renaissance. As a quintessential Gallatin experience, the course places emphasis on the cultural and historical contexts from which the literature and art of Renaissance Florence emerged. Students study the art of Florentine painters such as Botticelli, Giotto, and Michelangelo in the places where these works were created. Readings might include the works of Dante, Pico Della Mirandola, Machiavelli, and selected female writers, as well as art texts such as Vasari's The Lives of the Artists. Classes, which are taught in English, meet four days a week. Throughout the course, students will visit such museums and churches as the Uffizi, The Duomo, the church of Santa Maria Novella, and the monastery of San Marco to engage fully with the art and architecture of Renaissance Italy.

Notes

Graduate course open to undergraduate students.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

K95.2060 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2004

Italian Renaissance, Art and Literature: The Culture Explosion

4 units

Description

Course meets in Florence, June 5-26. Graduate course open to undergraduates. Many of our modern ideas about art, literature, architecture and its uses, politics, culture, philosophy, gender and class derive from the vibrant and prolific period of the Renaissance. During a three-week, interdisciplinary program in the beautiful and historic Florence, Italy, students are offered a total immersion and multifaceted learning experience that is an essential beginning to understanding our modern world through the lens of the Italian Renaissance. This course explores the literature, culture, art, and thought of the Renaissance from multiple perspectives. During their stay, students will develop and present an individualized project based on their academic interests and background, and the ways in which they have been inspired by the Renaissance. As a quintessential Gallatin experience, the course places emphasis on the cultural and historical contexts from which the literature and art of Renaissance Florence emerged. Students study the art of Florentine painters such as Botticelli, Giotto, and Michelangelo in the places where these works were created. Readings might include the works of Dante, Pico Della Mirandola, Machiavelli, and selected female writers, as well as art texts such as Vasari's The Lives of the Artists. Classes, which are taught in English, meet four days a week. Throughout the course, students will visit such museums and churches as the Uffizi, The Duomo, the church of Santa Maria Novella, and the monastery of San Marco to engage fully with the art and architecture of Renaissance Italy.

Notes

Graduate course open to undergraduate students.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9301 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SU 2012

Black in the City of Light, Paris

4 units
Section 002

Myisha Priest

Description

From the written works of Harlem Renaissance writers Langston Hughes, Claude McKay and Countee Cullen that fomented the Negritude movement, to the performances of Josephine Baker, to the art of Henry Ossawa Tanner and Beauford Delaney, to the music of jazz musicians Miles Davis, Charlie Parker and Bill Coleman, to the political philosophies and writings of W.E.B Dubois and James Baldwin, Paris's influence on the creation of African American culture has been profound. Less noted is the degree to which the African American presence in Paris influenced international art and political thought, from the use of African cubism among European artists to the shaping of the philosophies of thinkers like Sarte, Camus and de Beauvoir. We will focus on Paris as a site of exchange—as an intersection through which pass influential ideas, forms and actions. We will consider the degree to which the encounter with Paris paradoxically made African American writers and artists more aware of and intent upon defining and articulating their Americanness, and finding in it a foundation for increased political activism and shaping of a Pan-African sensibility and community. This class will examine the literature, art, food, geographies and politics of African American expatriates in Paris, paying particular attention to the ways that the view from another shore shaped political thought and activism arising from a deepened awareness of national and international identity that Paris inspired.

Notes

Course meets in Paris, May 26 - June 16

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9500 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2012

Berlin: Capital of Modernity

4 units
Karen Hornick

Description

Some of the most thrilling, momentous, and terrible events of the 1900’s occurred in Berlin, Germany. Today, Berlin's streets, buildings, and cultural monuments offer tales of warning and inspiration to the present century about the folly of nationalist ambition; inspiring sagas of intellectual and physical courage; cold testimonials of crime and retribution; lyrical ballads of brutal honesty; personal records of hope and despair. This three-week course set in the heart of that city will take in many of the sights and sounds of old and contemporary Berlin, but our course will focus on the involvement of twentieth-century politicians and activists, artists and architects, bohemians and intellectuals with the causes, experience, and far-reaching consequences of World War II. Our period of study begins just after World War I and focuses first on the turbulent politics and culture of Weimar Berlin in the 1920's. Then we consider the consolidation of Nazi power in the 1930's when Hitler declared Berlin his capital, and the seige on Berlin of 1945 that ended Hitler's Reich once and for all. We look next at life in Berlin during the Cold War years and pay particular attention to the impact of the Wall (built in 1961) on the imaginations and realities of Berlin's citizens, and finally we assess our experiences of this reunited city as the the astonishing building boom that followed the fall of the Wall in 1989 slows down and the city faces its future as an EU capital. Classes, taught in English, meet four days a week in a seminar room, but the course also includes a number of required field trips that encompass the rich resources of the city’s museums, neighborhoods, historical sites, memorials and cultural monuments. Students will be given ample opportunity to explore Berlin and develop their own individual projects. Survival German language courses will be offered.

Notes

Course meets in Berlin, June 23 - July 14

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9700 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
WI 2012

Culture, Development and Globalization in India

4 units
Ritty Lukose

Description

Contemporary representations of India either paint the subcontinent as a vast treasure trove of exotic culture and tradition and/or as an emergent economic powerhouse, rapidly modernizing to overtake the West. Sitting uneasily between these two images is the idea of India as a third world country, struggling with disparities of well being by trying to "develop" itself. During this two-week course based in Bangalore, India, students are offered an interdisciplinary learning experience that explores the dynamics of culture and development within globalizing India. Bangalore, considered the “Silicon Valley” of India, is at the epicenter of India’s information technology boom—its changing urban landscape a microcosm of third world urban development and globalization. In the classroom, students will be introduced to the philosophical underpinnings and practice of “development” as an important framework through which ideas of culture, economy, politics, tradition and modernity are organized and managed by the Indian state and international organizations. Background historical works will explore how the idea and practice of development are linked to colonialism and anticolonialism, capitalism, nationalism and globalization. Readings will also explore the cultural politics of tradition, tourism, heritage and monuments and the environment in order to understand how tourism is linked to development.

Notes

Permission and application required. Application deadline is October 14, 2011. For information or application, please contact Melissa Daniel at 212-998-7316 or melissa.daniel@nyu.edu

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2010

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel , Urry’s The Tourist Gaze , MacCannell’s The Tourist , and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: placestudies.com.

Notes

Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site during fall 2010.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9750 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
WI 2011

Istanbul: Mapping the Past in the Present

4 units
Hallie Franks

Description

From its early centuries as a Greek colony and Roman center, to its unique role as the imperial capital of both the Byzantine and the Ottoman Empires, to its latest distinction as a European Cultural Capital of 2010, Istanbul’s vaunted history spans over two and a half millennia. The city has been the site of dramatic shifts in global power, politics, and culture. Even now, its very form – which preserves, in its oldest parts, monuments from the ancient, Byzantine, and Ottoman pasts alongside one another–commemorates the varied traditions that have contributed to its rich history. In this course, the city itself will serve as the foundation for our investigation of the ways in which Istanbul’s pasts have been physically memorialized, narrated, and incorporated into the urban landscape. We will consider this landscape from a horizontal perspective by first mapping existing monuments in relationship to one another and considering the impact of the past on the current experiences of the city’s space. We will then map the city from a vertical perspective, addressing what is preserved, reused, or destroyed at pivotal historical moments, and exploring how the physical space at that moment reflects the changing identity of the city. The following monuments and sites in Istanbul’s “Old City” will serve as the center of our discussion: the Roman Hippodrome and Cisterns, the Hagia Sophia, the Süleymaniye Mosque, the Sultan Ahment Mosque, Topkapi Palace. We will also visit the neighborhoods in the “New City” that provide a contrast to such sites. These may include: Beyoglu, Galata, Kuzguncuk, and Kadikoy.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9800 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2010

Africa and the Politics of Aid

4 units
Millery Polyné

Description

With the demise of European colonial empires and the emergence of the neo-colonial state, the continent of Africa has become the center of development discourse. This dialectic between largely European and US American thinkers and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) has produced a slew of books within the last decade that analyze the impact of NGOs and the challenges of international aid programs. For the most part, many of these texts conclude that modernization must emulate the West, while other scholars argue the futility of monetary aid efforts. This course examines the shifting meaning of development from Africans and non- African thinkers. Is development a by-product of former colonial structures? In what ways do NGOs enhance or adversely affect developing nations? By exploring key texts that examine the problems of aid programs, strategies for structural and economic improvement, and ideas that address poverty, political instability and the rights of marginal groups, this course utilizes the disciplines of history, anthropology, and economics to better understand the merits and tensions of development in Africa. Group site visits both in and out of Accra will allow for further immersion in the history and culture of the region, ranging from visits to Elmina Castle, local NGOs, the W.E.B. Du Bois Memorial Center for Pan African Culture and outings to Ghanian museums and other historical sites. Students will live in NYU-arranged housing located in residential neighborhoods within walking distance from the NYU Center.

Notes

Course meets in Ghana, July 10-31.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

K55.9500 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2009

Berlin: Capital of Modernity

4 units

Description

Some of the most thrilling, momentous, and terrible events of the 1900's occurred in Berlin, and today its streets, buildings, and cultural monuments offer tales of warning and inspiration to the present century. This three-week course will take in many of the sights and sounds of old and contemporary Berlin, but our course will focus on the involvement of twentieth-century, Berlin-based politicians, activists, artists, architects, bohemians, writers, and intellectuals with the causes, experience, and consequences of World War II. Berlin's streets, buildings, memorials, and cultural monuments offer cautionary tales about the folly of nationalist ambition; inspiring sagas of intellectual and physical courage; cold testimonials of crime and retribution; lyrical ballads of brutal honesty; personal records of hope and despair. From one perspective, all of these narratives are episodes in an epic whose grand and central scene is World War II—and that is the point of view to be adopted in this interdisciplinary seminar set in Berlin. Our period of study begins just before the outbreak of World War I and ends during the astonishing building boom of the post-Wall 1990's and early 2000's. Group site visits occur throughout the week and on weekends, but students will be given ample opportunity to explore Berlin and develop their own individual projects. Field trips encompass the rich resources of the city's museums, neighborhoods, historical sites, memorials and cultural monuments. Classes, taught in English, meet four days a week.

Notes

Course meets in Berlin, June 26-July17.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9500 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2010

Berlin: Capital of Modernity

4 units
Karen Hornick

Description

Some of the most thrilling, momentous, and terrible events of the 1900's occurred in Berlin, and today its streets, buildings, and cultural monuments offer tales of warning and inspiration to the present century. This three-week course will take in many of the sights and sounds of old and contemporary Berlin, but our course will focus on the involvement of twentieth-century, Berlin-based politicians, activists, artists, architects, bohemians, writers, and intellectuals with the causes, experience, and consequences of World War II. Berlin's streets, buildings, memorials, and cultural monuments offer cautionary tales about the folly of nationalist ambition; inspiring sagas of intellectual and physical courage; cold testimonials of crime and retribution; lyrical ballads of brutal honesty; personal records of hope and despair. From one perspective, all of these narratives are episodes in an epic whose grand and central scene is World War II—and that is the point of view to be adopted in this interdisciplinary seminar set in Berlin. Our period of study begins just before the outbreak of World War I and ends during the astonishing building boom of the post-Wall 1990's and early 2000's. Group site visits occur throughout the week and on weekends, but students will be given ample opportunity to explore Berlin and develop their own individual projects. Field trips encompass the rich resources of the city's museums, neighborhoods, historical sites, memorials and cultural monuments. Classes, taught in English, meet four days a week.

Notes

Course meets in Berlin, June 26-July17.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

K95.2060 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2007

Italian Renaissance, Art and Literature: The Culture Explosion

4 units

Description

Course meets in Florence, June 5-26. Graduate course open to undergraduates. Many of our modern ideas about art, literature, architecture and its uses, politics, culture, philosophy, gender and class derive from the vibrant and prolific period of the Renaissance. During a three-week, interdisciplinary program in the beautiful and historic Florence, Italy, students are offered a total immersion and multifaceted learning experience that is an essential beginning to understanding our modern world through the lens of the Italian Renaissance. This course explores the literature, culture, art, and thought of the Renaissance from multiple perspectives. During their stay, students will develop and present an individualized project based on their academic interests and background, and the ways in which they have been inspired by the Renaissance. As a quintessential Gallatin experience, the course places emphasis on the cultural and historical contexts from which the literature and art of Renaissance Florence emerged. Students study the art of Florentine painters such as Botticelli, Giotto, and Michelangelo in the places where these works were created. Readings might include the works of Dante, Pico Della Mirandola, Machiavelli, and selected female writers, as well as art texts such as Vasari's The Lives of the Artists. Classes, which are taught in English, meet four days a week. Throughout the course, students will visit such museums and churches as the Uffizi, The Duomo, the church of Santa Maria Novella, and the monastery of San Marco to engage fully with the art and architecture of Renaissance Italy.

Notes

Graduate course open to undergraduate students.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2011

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel , MacCannell’s The Tourist, and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: www.travel-studies.com.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9500 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2011

Berlin: Capital of Modernity

4 units
Karen Hornick, Fredric Smoler

Description

Some of the most thrilling, momentous, and terrible events of the 1900’s occurred in Berlin, Germany. Today, Berlin's streets, buildings, and cultural monuments offer tales of warning and inspiration to the present century about the folly of nationalist ambition; inspiring sagas of intellectual and physical courage; cold testimonials of crime and retribution; lyrical ballads of brutal honesty; personal records of hope and despair. This three-week course set in the heart of that city will take in many of the sights and sounds of old and contemporary Berlin, but our course will focus on the involvement of twentieth-century politicians and activists, artists and architects, bohemians and intellectuals with the causes, experience, and far-reaching consequences of World War II. Our period of study begins just after World War I and focuses first on the turbulent politics and culture of Weimar Berlin in the 1920's. Then we consider the consolidation of Nazi power in the 1930's when Hitler declared Berlin his capital, and the seige on Berlin of 1945 that ended Hitler's Reich once and for all. We look next at life in Berlin during the Cold War years and pay particular attention to the impact of the Wall (built in 1961) on the imaginations and realities of Berlin's citizens, and finally we assess our experiences of this reunited city as the the astonishing building boom that followed the fall of the Wall in 1989 slows down and the city faces its future as an EU capital. Classes, taught in English, meet four days a week in a seminar room, but the course also includes a number of required field trips that encompass the rich resources of the city’s museums, neighborhoods, historical sites, memorials and cultural monuments. Students will be given ample opportunity to explore Berlin and develop their own individual projects. Survival German language courses will be offered.

Notes

Course meets in Berlin, June 25-July 16.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9250 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2011

Prague: Design as Performance

4 units
Kristin Horton

Description

During a three-week interdisciplinary course, students will investigate the unique visual artistry inherent in Czech theater, its history and influence in Eastern Europe, and its application in contemporary theater performance. Steeped in a legacy of theater performance rooted in the visual tradition, Prague is home and host to some of the most innovative work in theatrical design and performance. This course will trace the genealogy of design influenced performance from its roots in the concentration camps of World War II where the practice of using found objects in imaginative ways began as a means for creating the world of the play to the later 20th century when theater artists invented new ways of communicating visually with their audiences as a means to escape censorship from totalitarian government officials. Through architectural and gallery tours as well as attendance at Czech theaters we will investigate the historical and political conditions from which Eastern European theater emerged in the 20th century and the influence of visual design in contemporary Czech theater. Every four years, the city is also home to the Prague Quadrennial of Performance Design and Space, the largest exhibition of stage design in the world, showcasing the work of artists from more than 75 countries and featuring performances based in visual elements. The course will coincide with PQ12 and make use of this learning resource and opportunity to interact with artists from all over the world. The course will include hands on workshops where we will explore tools and approaches for collaboration between the visual and performing arts as well as new ways of incorporating visual arts into storytelling and performance. Classes, taught in English, meet four days per week.

Notes

Course meets in Prague, June 4-June 25.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9400 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2011

Buenos Aires: In and of the City

4 units
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

Buenos Aires, known as "The Paris of the South," is one of the mythic cities of the world. Containing nearly one-third of Argentina's population, the city has had an inordinate impact not only on Argentina, but on Latin American consciousness and identity. This three-week course will trace the evolution of the political theorists, educational reformers, and creative artists whose works have shaped the culture, art and politics of Buenos Aires and Argentina. Readings include excerpts from the works of Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, José Enrique Rodó, Robert Ferris Thompson, and George Reid Andrews; fiction by Jorge Luís Borges, Silvinia Ocampo, Julio Cortázar, Roberto Arlt, and Adolfo Bioy Casares; such documents as Nunca Más, and the film The Afro-Argentines. Field trips encompass the rich resources of the city's museums, historical sites, and ethnic neighborhoods. Sessions with leading Argentine jurists, educators, and artists are an important component of this course. In addition, students will spend one weekend in Montevideo, Uruguay.

Notes

Course meets in Buenos Aires, June 4-June 25.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9125 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Dickens' Jurisdictions: Bleak House and the Social and Legal Worlds of Nineteenth-Century London

4 units
Sara Murphy

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/summersaapp.html For more information: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/academics/undergraduate/global/travelcourses/london--dickens--jurisdictions.html Description: Dickens' novel, Bleak House (1852-53), is an omnibus of mid Victorian society, encompassing a wide range of themes: wealth and poverty, children and parents, legacies, the place of women, illness and health, crime and punishment, tradition and reform--all against the background of the rapidly growing, foggy, filthy city that is nineteenth-century London. Often it is said that this novel is 'about the law;' the case of Jarndyce and Jarndyce is a central driver of Dickens' sprawling story. Dickens also takes us into the broader world of legal London, offering some of the most memorable lawyer characters in nineteenth-century fiction. In this course, we focus intently on a slow and careful reading of Bleak House, supplemented by readings and field trips designed to help us understand nineteenth-century London and the Victorians. While locating the course in London will still not let us experience at first-hand Dickens' world, we can bring what might seem like very distant and strange locations closer through outside-the-classroom experiences that permit us to reflect on the city, which is in effect a character in the novel. We will frame our investigation with the idea of jurisdiction. Jurisdiction refers to the expertise or command of a particular court, but we will broaden this idea--as Dickens does in his novel--to think about space, place, and time, affect and desire, and the " jurisdiction" of literature. Who gets to "say the law" where and with what authority? What is the space of the literary? And how does the space of nineteenth-century London shape Dickens' fiction?

Notes

This three-week course meets in London, May 31 - June 21. Permission required. Application deadline is March 1, 2014. For more information and to apply, please click on course title and link to application.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9500 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Berlin: Capital of Modernity

4 units
Karen Hornick

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/summersaapp.html For more information: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/academics/undergraduate/global/travelcourses/berlin.html Description: Some of the most thrilling, momentous, and terrible events of the 1900’s occurred in Berlin, Germany. Today, Berlin's streets, buildings, and cultural monuments offer tales of warning and inspiration to the present century about the folly of nationalist ambition; inspiring sagas of intellectual and physical courage; cold testimonials of crime and retribution; lyrical ballads of brutal honesty; personal records of hope and despair. This course, set in the heart of that city, will take in many of the sights and sounds of old and contemporary Berlin. We will focus on the involvement of twentieth-century politicians and activists, artists and architects, bohemians and intellectuals with the causes, experience, and far-reaching consequences of World War II. Our period of study begins just after World War I and focuses first on the turbulent politics and culture of Weimar Berlin in the 1920's. Then we consider the consolidation of Nazi power in the 1930's when Hitler declared Berlin his capital, and the seige on Berlin of 1945 that ended Hitler's Reich once and for all. We look next at life in Berlin during the Cold War years and pay particular attention to the impact of the Wall (built in 1961) on the imaginations and realities of Berlin's citizens, and finally we assess our experiences of this reunited city as the the astonishing building boom that followed the fall of the Wall in 1989 slows down and the city faces its future as an EU capital. Required class meetings include several seminars a week as well as related field trips intended to deepen our understanding of the readings, as well as the rich resources of the city’s museums, neighborhoods, historical sites, memorials, and cultural monuments. There is a lot of required reading but students will find ample opportunity to explore Berlin and develop their own individual projects. The course is taught in English but we also provide a few voluntary survival German language classes.

Notes

This four-week course meets in Berlin, June 21 - July 19. Permission required. Application deadline is March 1, 2014. For more information and to apply, please click on course title and link to application.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2012

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel , MacCannell’s The Tourist, and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: www.travel-studies.com.

Notes

Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site during Spring 2012.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2012

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Syllabus

TRAVL-UG1200

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel , Urry’s The Tourist Gaze , MacCannell’s The Tourist , and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: travel-studies.com.

Notes

Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site during Fall 2012.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9301 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SU 2014

Black in the City of Light, Paris

4 units
Myisha Priest

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/summersaapp.html For more information: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/academics/undergraduate/global/travelcourses/paris.html Description: From the written works of Harlem Renaissance writers Langston Hughes, Claude McKay and Countee Cullen that fomented the Negritude movement, to the performances of Josephine Baker, to the art of Henry Ossawa Tanner and Beauford Delaney, to the music of jazz musicians Miles Davis, Charlie Parker and Bill Coleman, to the political philosophies and writings of W.E.B Dubois and James Baldwin, Paris's influence on the creation of African American culture has been profound. Less noted is the degree to which the African American presence in Paris influenced international art and political thought, from the use of African cubism among European artists to the shaping of the philosophies of thinkers like Sarte, Camus and de Beauvoir. We will focus on Paris as a site of exchange—as an intersection through which pass influential ideas, forms and actions. We will consider the degree to which the encounter with Paris paradoxically made African American writers and artists more aware of and intent upon defining and articulating their Americanness, and finding in it a foundation for increased political activism and shaping of a Pan-African sensibility and community. This class will examine the literature, art, food, geographies and politics of African American expatriates in Paris, paying particular attention to the ways that the view from another shore shaped political thought and activism arising from a deepened awareness of national and international identity that Paris inspired.

Notes

This three-week course meets in Paris, June 8 - June 28. Permission required. Application deadline is March 1, 2014. For more information and to apply, please click on course title and link to application.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2011

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel , Urry’s The Tourist Gaze , MacCannell’s The Tourist , and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: travel-studies.com.

Notes

Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site during fall 2011.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9301 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SU 2013

Black in the City of Light, Paris

4 units
Section 002

Myisha Priest

Description

From the written works of Harlem Renaissance writers Langston Hughes, Claude McKay and Countee Cullen that fomented the Negritude movement, to the performances of Josephine Baker, to the art of Henry Ossawa Tanner and Beauford Delaney, to the music of jazz musicians Miles Davis, Charlie Parker and Bill Coleman, to the political philosophies and writings of W.E.B Dubois and James Baldwin, Paris's influence on the creation of African American culture has been profound. Less noted is the degree to which the African American presence in Paris influenced international art and political thought, from the use of African cubism among European artists to the shaping of the philosophies of thinkers like Sarte, Camus and de Beauvoir. We will focus on Paris as a site of exchange—as an intersection through which pass influential ideas, forms and actions. We will consider the degree to which the encounter with Paris paradoxically made African American writers and artists more aware of and intent upon defining and articulating their Americanness, and finding in it a foundation for increased political activism and shaping of a Pan-African sensibility and community. This class will examine the literature, art, food, geographies and politics of African American expatriates in Paris, paying particular attention to the ways that the view from another shore shaped political thought and activism arising from a deepened awareness of national and international identity that Paris inspired.

Notes

Course meets in Paris, May 25 - June 15

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9500 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SU 2013

Berlin: Capital of Modernity

4 units
Karen Hornick

Description

Some of the most thrilling, momentous, and terrible events of the 1900’s occurred in Berlin, Germany. Today, Berlin's streets, buildings, and cultural monuments offer tales of warning and inspiration to the present century about the folly of nationalist ambition; inspiring sagas of intellectual and physical courage; cold testimonials of crime and retribution; lyrical ballads of brutal honesty; personal records of hope and despair. This course, set in the heart of that city, will take in many of the sights and sounds of old and contemporary Berlin. We will focus on the involvement of twentieth-century politicians and activists, artists and architects, bohemians and intellectuals with the causes, experience, and far-reaching consequences of World War II. Our period of study begins just after World War I and focuses first on the turbulent politics and culture of Weimar Berlin in the 1920's. Then we consider the consolidation of Nazi power in the 1930's when Hitler declared Berlin his capital, and the seige on Berlin of 1945 that ended Hitler's Reich once and for all. We look next at life in Berlin during the Cold War years and pay particular attention to the impact of the Wall (built in 1961) on the imaginations and realities of Berlin's citizens, and finally we assess our experiences of this reunited city as the the astonishing building boom that followed the fall of the Wall in 1989 slows down and the city faces its future as an EU capital. Required class meetings include several seminars a week as well as related field trips intended to deepen our understanding of the readings, as well as the rich resources of the city’s museums, neighborhoods, historical sites, memorials, and cultural monuments. There is a lot of required reading but students will find ample opportunity to explore Berlin and develop their own individual projects. The course is taught in English but we also provide a few voluntary survival German language classes.

Notes

Course meets in Berlin, June 22 - July 20

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2014

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Syllabus

TRAVL-UG1200

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel , Urry’s The Tourist Gaze, MacCannell’s The Tourist , and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: travel-studies.com.

Notes

Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2015

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Syllabus

TRAVL-UG1200

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel , Urry’s The Tourist Gaze, MacCannell’s The Tourist , and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: travelstudies.org.

Notes

Permission of the instructor required (ssh1@nyu.edu). Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2014

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel , Urry’s The Tourist Gaze, MacCannell’s The Tourist , and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: travel-studies.com.

Notes

Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9500 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Berlin: Capital of Modernity

4 units
Karen Hornick

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/summersaapp.html For more information: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/academics/undergraduate/global/travelcourses/berlin.html Description: THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT N.Y.U. BERLIN. Some of the most thrilling, momentous, and terrible events of the 1900’s occurred in Berlin, Germany. Today, Berlin's streets, buildings, and cultural monuments offer tales of warning and inspiration to the present century about the folly of nationalist ambition; inspiring sagas of intellectual and physical courage; cold testimonials of crime and retribution; lyrical ballads of brutal honesty; personal records of hope and despair. This course, set in the heart of that city, will take in many of the sights and sounds of old and contemporary Berlin. We will focus on the involvement of twentieth-century politicians and activists, artists and architects, bohemians and intellectuals with the causes, experience, and far-reaching consequences of World War II. Our period of study begins just after World War I and focuses first on the turbulent politics and culture of Weimar Berlin in the 1920's. Then we consider the consolidation of Nazi power in the 1930's when Hitler declared Berlin his capital, and the seige on Berlin of 1945 that ended Hitler's Reich once and for all. We look next at life in Berlin during the Cold War years and pay particular attention to the impact of the Wall (built in 1961) on the imaginations and realities of Berlin's citizens, and finally we assess our experiences of this reunited city as the the astonishing building boom that followed the fall of the Wall in 1989 slows down and the city faces its future as an EU capital. Required class meetings include several seminars a week as well as related field trips intended to deepen our understanding of the readings, as well as the rich resources of the city’s museums, neighborhoods, historical sites, memorials, and cultural monuments. There is a lot of required reading but students will find ample opportunity to explore Berlin and develop their own individual projects. The course is taught in English but we also provide a few voluntary survival German language classes.

Notes

This four-week course meets in Berlin, June 1 - June 27. Permission required. Application deadline is March 1, 2015. For more information and to apply, please click on course title and link to application.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9050 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Hawaii: Island Science

4 units
Matthew Stanley

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE IN HAWAII. Islands play a special role in a variety of scientific disciplines, both as privileged sites of experimentation and as unique objects of study. Islands are places where we can see into Earth's interior, into the depths of the ocean, and into the distant past. They have also been key locations for understanding human societies and building empires in the formerly unreachable. Hawai'i has a number of unusual natural and cultural features that make it a particularly fruitful location for this kind of pursuit. Its marine animals, such as dolphins, can help us understand not only the aquatic environment but also the nature of consciousness and communication. Its indigenous culture still retains a robust presence, providing a way to study how cultures develop in isolation and how they change with outside exposure. This interdisciplinary science course will explore the Hawaiian islands through the perspective of various scientific disciplines such as geology, oceanography, marine biology, geography, ecology, and astronomy, as well as anthropology, evolution, exploration, and climate change.

Notes

Course meets in Hawaii, July 18-August 8

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9350 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SU 2015

Madrid: Faces of the Changing European City

4 units
Gianpaolo Baiocchi

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT N.Y.U. MADRID. This course explores the contemporary history and geography of Madrid, with a focus on recent changes. Compared to just twenty years ago, Madrid, like most European cities, is today more diverse, more interconnected (and subject to more complex governance arrangements), more unequal, more subject to volatile financial investments, and more environmentally vulnerable. This course explores both how residents have experienced these changes and how organized groups and institutions have sought to respond to these challenges.

Notes

This course meets in Madrid, June 27-July 20.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9500 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SU 2016

Berlin: Capital of Modernity

4 units
Karen Hornick

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/summersaapp.html For more information: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/academics/undergraduate/global/travelcourses/berlin.html Description: Some of the most thrilling, momentous, and terrible events of the 1900’s occurred in Berlin, Germany. Today, Berlin's streets, buildings, and cultural monuments offer tales of warning and inspiration to the present century about the folly of nationalist ambition; inspiring sagas of intellectual and physical courage; cold testimonials of crime and retribution; lyrical ballads of brutal honesty; personal records of hope and despair. This course, set in the heart of that city, will take in many of the sights and sounds of old and contemporary Berlin. We will focus on the involvement of twentieth-century politicians and activists, artists and architects, bohemians and intellectuals with the causes, experience, and far-reaching consequences of World War II. Our period of study begins just after World War I and focuses first on the turbulent politics and culture of Weimar Berlin in the 1920's. Then we consider the consolidation of Nazi power in the 1930's when Hitler declared Berlin his capital, and the seige on Berlin of 1945 that ended Hitler's Reich once and for all. We look next at life in Berlin during the Cold War years and pay particular attention to the impact of the Wall (built in 1961) on the imaginations and realities of Berlin's citizens, and finally we assess our experiences of this reunited city as the the astonishing building boom that followed the fall of the Wall in 1989 slows down and the city faces its future as an EU capital. Required class meetings include several seminars a week as well as related field trips intended to deepen our understanding of the readings, as well as the rich resources of the city’s museums, neighborhoods, historical sites, memorials, and cultural monuments. There is a lot of required reading but students will find ample opportunity to explore Berlin and develop their own individual projects. The course is taught in English but we also provide a few voluntary survival German language classes.

Notes

This four-week course meets in Berlin, June 4 - July 1. Permission required. Application deadline is March 1, 2015. For more information and to apply, please click on course title and link to application.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9801 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SU 2016

Postcolonial Urbanisms: Development, Environment, and Social Movements in Senegal

4 units
Rosalind Fredericks

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/summersaapp.html For more information: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/academics/undergraduate/global/travelcourses/SenegalPostcolonialUrbanisms.html Description: This travel course examines urban development in the postcolonial global South through the lens of cities in Senegal, West Africa. Like elsewhere across the global South, Senegal is rapidly becoming urban. This process implies a host of important transformations and challenges for development, the environment, and the socio-political lives of city-dwellers. Owing to the country’s particular development trajectory, long history of urbanization, and important legacy as one of Africa’s strongest democracies, Senegal provides an especially fascinating place to examine these dynamics and grapple with their implications for urbanism in the global South and beyond. This course will be based in Senegal’s capital city, Dakar, but will include overnight trips to the other important Senegalese cities of Saint Louis (the colonial capital of French West Africa) and Touba (Senegal’s Islamic Mecca) to compare the form and function of these alternative urban histories and development strategies. Through a combination of course readings, classroom lectures, tours, walks, and field visits, we will explore the legacies of colonialism and unpack a number of key contemporary debates and challenges faced by urban planners and city residents.

Notes

This three-week travel course goes to Dakar, Senegal,May 24 - June 15. Permission required. Application deadline is February 1. For more information and to apply, please click on course title and link to application.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2016

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s  The Art of Travel , Urry’s  The Tourist Gaze,  MacCannell’s  The Tourist , and Leed’s  The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: travelstudies.org.

Notes

Permission of the instructor required (ssh1@nyu.edu). Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site. Due to local restrictions on what are considered to be online courses, this course is not available to students studying at NYU London, NYU Madrid, or NYU Accra.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
FA 2015

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Syllabus

TRAVL-UG1200

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s  The Art of Travel , Urry’s  The Tourist Gaze,  MacCannell’s  The Tourist , and Leed’s  The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: travel-studies.com.

Notes

Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site. Please note: Due to British immigration policy, students at NYU London are ineligible to enroll in this on-line course.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-GG2060 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SU 2012

Italian Renaissance, Art and Literature: The Culture Explosion

4 units
Bella Mirabella

Description

During a three-week, interdisciplinary program in beautiful and historic Florence, Italy, students are offered a total immersion and multifaceted learning experience that is an essential beginning to understanding our modern world through the lens of the Italian Renaissance. This course explores the literature, culture, art, and thought of the Renaissance from multiple perspectives. During their stay, students develop and present an individualized project based on their academic interests and background, and the ways in which the Renaissance has inspired them. As a quintessential Gallatin experience, the course places emphasis on the cultural and historical contexts from which the literature and art of Renaissance Florence emerged. Readings might include the works of Dante, Pico Della Mirandola, Machiavelli, and selected female writers, as well as art texts such as Vasari's The Lives of the Artists . In addition, students study the art of Florentine painters such as Botticelli, Giotto, and Michelangelo in the places where these works were created. Throughout the course, students will visit museums and churches such as the Uffizi, The Duomo, the church of Santa Maria Novella, and the monastery of San Marco to engage fully with the art and architecture of Renaissance Italy. Classes, which are taught in English, meet four days a week.

Notes

Course meets in Florence, June 3 - 24.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-GG)

TRAVL-GG2060 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SU 2010

Italian Renaissance, Art and Literature: The Culture Explosion

4 units
Bella Mirabella

Description

Course meets in Florence, June 5-26. Graduate course open to undergraduates. Many of our modern ideas about art, literature, architecture and its uses, politics, culture, philosophy, gender and class derive from the vibrant and prolific period of the Renaissance. During a three-week, interdisciplinary program in the beautiful and historic Florence, Italy, students are offered a total immersion and multifaceted learning experience that is an essential beginning to understanding our modern world through the lens of the Italian Renaissance. This course explores the literature, culture, art, and thought of the Renaissance from multiple perspectives. During their stay, students will develop and present an individualized project based on their academic interests and background, and the ways in which they have been inspired by the Renaissance. As a quintessential Gallatin experience, the course places emphasis on the cultural and historical contexts from which the literature and art of Renaissance Florence emerged. Students study the art of Florentine painters such as Botticelli, Giotto, and Michelangelo in the places where these works were created. Readings might include the works of Dante, Pico Della Mirandola, Machiavelli, and selected female writers, as well as art texts such as Vasari's The Lives of the Artists. Classes, which are taught in English, meet four days a week. Throughout the course, students will visit such museums and churches as the Uffizi, The Duomo, the church of Santa Maria Novella, and the monastery of San Marco to engage fully with the art and architecture of Renaissance Italy.

Notes

Graduate course open to undergraduate students.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-GG)

TRAVL-GG2060 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SU 2013

Italian Renaissance, Art and Literature: The Culture Explosion

4 units
Bella Mirabella

Description

During a three-week, interdisciplinary program in beautiful and historic Florence, Italy, students are offered a total immersion and multifaceted learning experience that is an essential beginning to understanding our modern world through the lens of the Italian Renaissance. This course explores the literature, culture, art, and thought of the Renaissance from multiple perspectives. During their stay, students develop and present an individualized project based on their academic interests and background, and the ways in which the Renaissance has inspired them. As a quintessential Gallatin experience, the course places emphasis on the cultural and historical contexts from which the literature and art of Renaissance Florence emerged. Readings might include the works of Dante, Pico Della Mirandola, Machiavelli, and selected female writers, as well as art texts such as Vasari's The Lives of the Artists . In addition, students study the art of Florentine painters such as Botticelli, Giotto, and Michelangelo in the places where these works were created. Throughout the course, students will visit museums and churches such as the Uffizi, The Duomo, the church of Santa Maria Novella, and the monastery of San Marco to engage fully with the art and architecture of Renaissance Italy. Classes, which are taught in English, meet four days a week.

Notes

Course meets in Florence, June 2 - 22

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-GG)

TRAVL-GG2060 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SU 2015

Italian Renaissance, Art and Literature: The Culture Explosion

4 units
Bella Mirabella

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT N.Y.U. FLORENCE. During a three-week, interdisciplinary program in beautiful and historic Florence, Italy, students are offered a total immersion and multifaceted learning experience that is an essential beginning to understanding our modern world through the lens of the Italian Renaissance. This course explores the literature, culture, art, and thought of the Renaissance from multiple perspectives. During their stay, students develop and present an individualized project based on their academic interests and background, and the ways in which the Renaissance has inspired them. As a quintessential Gallatin experience, the course places emphasis on the cultural and historical contexts from which the literature and art of Renaissance Florence emerged. Readings might include the works of Dante, Pico Della Mirandola, Machiavelli, and selected female writers, as well as art texts such as Vasari's The Lives of the Artists . In addition, students study the art of Florentine painters such as Botticelli, Giotto, and Michelangelo in the places where these works were created. Throughout the course, students will visit museums and churches such as the Uffizi, The Duomo, the church of Santa Maria Novella, and the monastery of San Marco to engage fully with the art and architecture of Renaissance Italy. Classes, which are taught in English, meet four days a week.

Notes

Course meets in Florence, June 7 - 27

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-GG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2013

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s The Art of Travel , Urry’s The Tourist Gaze, MacCannell’s The Tourist , and Leed’s The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: travel-studies.com.

Notes

Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site during Spring 2013.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

TRAVL-UG9801 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
WI 2014

Postcolonial Urbanisms: Development, Environment, and Social Movements in Senegal

4 units
Rosalind Fredericks

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/winter_travel.html For more information: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/academics/undergraduate/global/travelcourses/SenegalPostcolonialUrbanisms.html Description: This travel course examines urban development in the postcolonial global South through the lens of cities in Senegal, West Africa. Like elsewhere across the global South, Senegal is rapidly becoming urban. This process implies a host of important transformations and challenges for development, the environment, and the socio-political lives of city-dwellers. Owing to the country’s particular development trajectory, long history of urbanization, and important legacy as one of Africa’s strongest democracies, Senegal provides an especially fascinating place to examine these dynamics and grapple with their implications for urbanism in the global South and beyond. This course will be based in Senegal’s capital city, Dakar, but will include overnight trips to the other important Senegalese cities of Saint Louis (the colonial capital of French West Africa) and Touba (Senegal’s Islamic Mecca) to compare the form and function of these alternative urban histories and development strategies. Through a combination of course readings, classroom lectures, tours, walks, and field visits, we will explore the legacies of colonialism and unpack a number of key contemporary debates and challenges faced by urban planners and city residents.

Notes

This three-week travel course goes to Dakar, Senegal, January 4-23. Permission required. Application deadline is October 25, 2013. For more information and to apply, please click on course title and link to application.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)