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Academic Policy Updates

Undergraduate Program Changes for 2017 



New Rationale Deadlines & Registration Block 

New Policy:  For students graduating in May, adviser-approved Rationales must be submitted to Gallatin no later than November 1. For students graduating in September, the deadline will be April 1. For students graduating in January, the deadline will be October 1. Seniors who fail to submit a Rationale by the deadline will have a registration hold placed on their accounts. The hold will remain in place until an adviser-approved Rationale has been submitted to Gallatin.

 

Reason for the change:

Over the last few years, the School has experienced an increased number of late Rationale submissions, but this delay has not correlated with stronger Rationales.  Instead, most Rationales are submitted to second readers in a large batch within weeks of graduation, and the reviewers are not able to require the appropriate revisions in time to guarantee the best Colloquium possible or the student’s timely graduation. To help our students produce the best Rationale and Colloquium, and to have an opportunity to do a Senior Project, we realize we must help them to produce their rationale earlier. 

Effective date for the change:

Students who plan to graduate in January 2018 are the first group of students who will be expected to submit the adviser-approved Rationale by the earlier deadline of October 1, 2017. Below are the other dates for the next few graduation periods:

Students planning to graduate at the end of this semester:

The adviser-approved Rationale must be submitted to Gallatin no later than:

January 2018

October 1, 2017

May 2018

November 1, 2017

September 2018

April 1, 2018

January 2019

October 1, 2018

 

 

 

 

If you are advising a senior in Fall 2017 who plans to graduate in January 2018 or May 2018:

  • Because these students must submit the adviser-approved Rationale by October 1 for January graduation or November 1 for May graduation, they may need to begin work on their Rationale before the end of Spring 2017, and should be encouraged to work independently during Summer 2017.
  • When Fall 2017 classes resume, advisers should ask students to submit a first draft of the Rationale by the second week of fall classes for January 2018 graduates, and by the first week of October for May 2018 graduates.
  • Know that seniors will receive information about the October 1st and November 1st deadline from the Office of Academic Advising, and they will be warned about a registration block for Spring 2018.
  • If your advisee is blocked from Spring 2018 registration:
  1. The student will see a “Rationale Hold” on Albert in their Student Center.
  2.  Both you and your student will receive communication about the block from the Office of Academic Advising
  3. Since Spring 2018 registration will begin sometime in mid-November, this additional time will give blocked students a chance to have the registration restriction lifted one last time.

Contact for questions:

Gallatin Office of Academic Advising

Amy Spellacy, Assistant Dean of Advising
Benjamin Brooks, Senior Class Adviser
Meredith Theeman, Senior Class Adviser



Revised Rationale Description

New Text: The Rationale is a short (five to eight pages) paper that provides a foundation and scaffolding for the conversation the student will have at their Colloquium. The Rationale focuses on ideas, questions, and lines of inquiry that have emerged from the pursuit of the student’s concentration, and which they find particularly compelling. These ideas should be discussed in reflection with several texts drawn from all areas of the Booklist. This should be interdisciplinary (connecting different fields and methods) and historically aware (connecting different times and places).

 

A strong Rationale shows the student’s ability to engage with the scholarly debates and divergent perspectives relevant to their Colloquium topic. In particular, the texts from the Booklist should be put in conversation with each other so as to illuminate and illustrate the ideas at the core of the student’s Colloquium. The student should use this disciplinary, historical, and cultural diversity to examine the concentration from multiple viewpoints and lay out fruitful topics for Colloquium discussion. The Rationale is not expected to have an argument or thesis. Rather, it should have a tentative, speculative approach. It should embrace uncertainty and unresolved questions: it is a map for a conversation, not an encyclopedia entry.

 

The Rationale should be proofread carefully for spelling, grammar, and the format of citations (if any). It should not involve significant jargon, and should be understandable by readers from a variety of fields. Items on the Booklist should be identified with complete bibliographic information, including full title, name of author, and date of publication.

 

Reason for the Change:

Over the last few years, the Gallatin faculty has been reviewing the School's literature concerning major components of the degree (IAPC, Concentration, Colloquium, etc.) to ensure that the public statements are updated and consistent with current academic philosophy and practice. The goal is to provide clear language that will help advisers and students better understand the Gallatin program and its components. 

This year the faculty undertook a formal review of the printed description of the Rationale to ensure that an updated, comprehensive, and cohesive answer to these questions is apparent in the School's literature:

1) What is the purpose of the Rationale?  

2) What is its function in a Gallatin student’s education?

Individual faculty responses to these questions were reviewed and distilled for commonalities, and the new Rationale description emerged.  This new statement was discussed and the faculty voted to approve it for publication.

Effective date for the change:

The new Rationale description is currently published.

Contact for questions:



Sample Rationales, Booklists, and IAPCs Website

New Tool:  To assist students and advisers with the development of an individualized concentration, the Gallatin faculty has created a website consisting of several annotated samples of Intellectual Autobiography and Plan for Concentration (IAPC) essays, Rationales, and Booklists.

 

Gallatin students and advisers can access this website by selecting this link: Sample Rationales, IAPCs, and Booklists. This page will open in a new window, and users must enter their NYU NetID and password before being able to access the site. Students should discuss these samples with their advisers, as every concentration will have unique needs not accounted for in these examples.
 

Reason for Change:

In Spring 2015, the faculty committee on advisement and policies conducted a series of faculty focus groups to discuss the Gallatin Concentration.  Questions they addressed included:

  • What is the purpose of the Gallatin Concentration?
  • What do we hope students will learn by pursuing their own concentrations rather than selecting a faculty-designed major?
  • What do effective concentrations look like?
  • Do we provide the kinds of resources that students need to build one?

The immediate result of the focus groups led to an updated statement on the Gallatin Concentration, which can be read here on the Gallatin website.

An extended outcome of the focus groups led to the commitment to develop tools that would help both students and advisers in the development of a concentration.  It was decided that annotated samples of IAPCs, Rationales, and Booklists should be made available to students and advisers. 

Effective date for the change:

The new website is currently available to faculty advisers and students.

What advisers need to know about the new website:

The Sample Rationales, Booklists, and IAPCs website is available only to those in the NYU community.  You will need to enter your NetID and password to log in.

Once logged in, you will see several students’ samples. Each sample contains an individual student’s IAPC, Rationale, and Booklist, as well as the comments of the second faculty reader of the Rationale.  These documents have been annotated by the Gallatin faculty to provide guidance to students and advisers.  In addition, the School’s published statements about the Gallatin IAPC, Rationale, Booklist, and Colloquium are printed on the landing page.

The faculty’s intent is to properly contextualize the various materials in the samples. That is, not just posting a great Rationale or a great Booklist or a great IAPC, but seeing how the three all interact.  The materials should be read as parts of a larger whole rather than freestanding.  The faculty looked for a variety of content and formats to reflect the broad range of our students' interests. We consider this website a work in progress, and we are looking to add more samples to further expand the range of interests.

Since every concentration will have unique needs not accounted for in these examples, students are instructed to discuss these samples with their advisers.  Advisers can use the materials on this website as they think appropriate, but the materials are not intended to replace an individual adviser’s guidance to their advisees.

Contact for Questions:

Gallatin Advisement & Policies Committee

c/o Celeste Orangers



Internship Program Revisions

New Policy: The number of credits/units a student can receive for an Internship will be based upon the academic workload or the number of Gallatin assignments as determined by the student and adviser. (So, the number of credits/units for a Gallatin Internship will no longer be determined by the number of hours a student is working at the internship placement site. All internship students will work a minimum of 8-10 hours per week at the placement site over the course of the semester, regardless of the number of credits/units they seek.) .

 

In advance of starting work at an internship placement, students will be asked to articulate in a proposal form their learning objectives and activities (i.e., what do they hope to learn and how do they think they will achieve this), and to identify and describe the internship model they will pursue. After the first couple of weeks students will need to fill out a new Internship Learning and Contract form, which will require adviser/instructor approval.  

 

Reason for the Change:

After a multi-year review of the Internship Program, the faculty identified the need for greater integration of academic rigor within students’ internship experiences, while maintaining flexibility to accommodate the various types of internships that must exist for students in an interdisciplinary school. The basic premise for these changes is that the faculty wants students to be engaging in academic learning alongside experiential learning if the School is granting credit for an internship experience.

Effective date for the change:

Students interested in doing an Internship for Summer 2017 and later will be asked to follow the new guidelines for a Gallatin Internship.

If you are advising a student who plans to do an Internship in Summer 2017 or later:

Look for specific information in an email from Gallatin’s Senior Director of Academic Internships, Nancy Rubino.  You can also review the Gallatin Internship website for more information.

Contact for questions:

Dr. Nancy Rubino
Senior Director, Academic Internships
nancy.rubino@nyu.edu
Tel: (212) 992-8706


Faith Stangler
Director of External Programs
fs1@nyu.edu
Tel: (212) 998-7376



IAPC Deadline for New Junior Transfer Students

New Policy: Students who transfer into Gallatin with 64 or more units must complete the IAPC (Intellectual Autobiography & Plan for Concentration) requirement during their first semester at Gallatin.

 

Deadlines for Submission of Adviser-Approved IAPC to Gallatin:

Summer/fall admits – November 1
Spring admits – April 1

 

Reason for the change:

Continuing students are expected to complete the IAPC by the end of sophomore year, which is when a student completes 64 units. Transfer students admitted to Gallatin with 64 or more units are therefore behind, and need more support from Gallatin to catch up and successfully develop their Gallatin concentration, write a good Rationale, perform well at their Colloquium, and have the opportunity to do a Gallatin Senior Project. In order for our junior transfer students to reach their full potential, they need to start Gallatin with a first draft of the IAPC. Our Office of Academic Advising is therefore working with these students before they transfer to complete a Gallatin Concentration Planning Worksheet.  The Worksheet is designed to serve as a student’s first draft of the IAPC, and will be forwarded to the student’s adviser at the start of the student’s first semester. Given this advance concentration work, the expectation is that junior transfers will be able to produce a final IAPC with their advisers by mid-semester. To encourage students to meet the November 1 or April 1 deadline, we will remind them that they will have a registration hold placed on their accounts for the subsequent semester if they don’t meet this deadline.

Effective date for the change:

Transfer students admitted in Summer/Fall 2017 with 64 or more units will be the first group of students who must submit their adviser-approved IAPC by the new deadline of November 1, 2017.  Students admitted in Spring 2018 with 64 or more units must submit their adviser-approved IAPC by April 1, 2018.

If you are advising a newly admitted junior transfer student in Fall 2017:

  • Look for an email in early September from one of Gallatin’s transfer advisers that will contain your student’s Concentration Planning Worksheet.
  • Encourage your student to submit a final draft of the IAPC to you by early-October to ensure that you will have time to review it and ask for revisions before November 1.
  • Know that junior transfer students will receive information about the November 1st deadline from the Office of Academic Advising, and they will be warned about a registration block for Spring 2018.
  • If your advisee is blocked from Spring 2018 registration:
  1. The student will see an “IAPC Hold” on Albert in their Student Center.
  2. Both you and your student will receive communication about the block from the Office of Academic Advising
  3. Since Spring 2018 registration will begin sometime in mid-November, this additional time will allow blocked students to submit their adviser-approved IAPC’s and a have the restriction lifted before registration.

Contact for questions:

Gallatin Office of Academic Advising

Joshua Shirkey, Transfer Adviser
Lisa Daily, Transfer Adviser
Cyd Cipolla, Sophomore Class Adviser
Matthew Gregory, Junior Class Adviser

 



Senior Project Revision

New Policy: The Senior Project proposal description has been revised to help students better understand the preparation and rigor required for undertaking a Senior Project.  Students must explicitly demonstrate their preparation to carry out their project. They will need to elaborate on the skills and methods that are required to complete the project, as well as the intellectual or theoretical background they have acquired in order to complete the project to a high standard in a semester. Proposals will not be approved by the Senior Project Committee if the student cannot demonstrate adequate preparation. Students whose proposals are denied are redirected to scale back the project and do it as a Gallatin Independent Study. 

 

Reason for the Change:

Because some students had difficulty understanding the Senior Project Committee’s decision to redirect their project to an Independent Study, it was determined that the description of the Senior Project should be revised to better explain the expectations to students in advance of submission of a proposal.  Hopefully this change will lead to more clarity for students and better final projects.

Effective date for the change:

Students interested in doing a Senior Project for Fall 2017 and later will be asked to follow the new proposal requirements.   

If you are advising a senior who plans to do a Senior Project:

Senior Project proposals for fall are due by May 1, and proposals for spring are due by December 1. Because students must have their adviser’s approval on the proposal, advisers should read the proposal carefully to make sure the student is adequately prepared for their Senior Project.

Contacts for questions:

Gallatin Senior Project Committee
Benjamin Brooks, Senior Class Adviser
Meredith Theeman, Senior Class Adviser



Expanded Options for External Study

Updated Policy: Undergraduate students wishing to study at another university in the United States may apply to complete up to 8 credits/units of external study per term, with a maximum of 16 credits/units over the course of the B.A. degree. Students on a leave of absence can be approved to study at another university. With this change, students may now receive credit for a course at another university in the United States that is similar to a course offered by NYU.  

 

Reason for the Change:

Gallatin students who believe their concentrations would benefit from study outside of NYU’s global network have been able to apply for approval to take courses at other institutions while matriculated at Gallatin, but there were restrictions that have now been lifted under this new policy.  This new policy change is intended primarily to assist students who want to accelerate, need a final few credits to graduate, or are out on medical leave of absence.  Ambitious or financially strapped students could take summer courses while living at home, and students with medical issues could continue to make academic progress during their time away from NYU.

Effective date for the change:

Starting Summer 2017 students can be approved under the new policy and guidelines.

What you need to know if your advisee asks you about studying at another university in the United States:

  • Advisers should consider whether courses taken at another university will help their advisees fulfill their academic goals at Gallatin before approving or rejecting the application.
  • Because there are slight policy and procedural differences between external study at a another university inside the United States versus one outside the United States, advisees interested in studying at another university in the US should be referred to the Domestic External Study website.  For advisees interested in studying at another university outside of the United States, specific information is available on the International External Study website.
  • Students who already have 64 credits/units in transfer and/or advanced standing credit (AP, IB, etc.) might not be eligible for external study.  External study credits are considered transfer credits, and Gallatin’s transfer credit limit is 64 credits/units.
  • If an adviser approves the Domestic External Study application, it will be sent to Gallatin’s Office of Academic Advising where the external university/college will be vetted, course(s) will be evaluated for transfer, and the student’s record will be reviewed for eligibility.
  • Students who have been suspended for discipline reasons are ineligible for external study.

Contact for questions: