Skip Navigation

Ngina Chiteji

Associate Professor
nc518@nyu.edu
(212) 992-6313
1 Wash Pl, Room 410

Download as vCard

Office Hours
Monday By Appt
Tuesday By Appt
Wednesday 3-5
Thursday By Appt

Ngina Chiteji’s teaching and research interests include public policy, macroeconomics, economic inequality, crime, and the distribution of household wealth in the United States. She is co-editor of Wealth Accumulation and Communities of Color in the United States (with Jessica Gordon Nembhard, University of Michigan Press, 2006). Her research also has been published in several scholarly journals, including the Journal of Black Studies, the Journal of Family and Economic Issues, and Labour Economics. She currently is engaged in two research projects: the first examines defined contribution pensions and the Great Recession's effect on retirement savings; the second analyzes the effect that incarceration has on wealth accumulation and an individual's ability to prepare for retirement. In addition to her teaching at Gallatin, she is an associate faculty member of the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service.

Teaching and Research Interests

macroeconomic theory and policy, economic inequality, social welfare policy, the Congressional budget process, the socio-economic consequences of incarceration, saving and borrowing behavior throughout the life course, political economy

Ngina Chiteji

Education

B.A. Economics, Brown University, 1988
Ph.D. Economics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1997

Recent News

Professor Ngina Chiteji presented the paper “The Great Recession and Retirement Saving” at the 2016 Midwest Economics Association’s annual conference which was held in Evanston, Illinois. The work is the result of joint research that Chiteji has done with Dr. Sheldon Danziger of the Russell Sage Foundation.

 

 

Professor Chiteji was featured on the National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI) website.

 

 

Professor Chiteji contributed a short piece to the NYU Furman Center's online discussion of the financial crisis and residential segregation.

 

 

Courses

2017 Spring

The Promise and Pitfalls of Markets

2016 Spring

The Promise and Pitfalls of Markets

2015 Fall

Crime in the USA

Government and the Economy: What Every Citizen Should Know

2015 Spring

The Promise and Pitfalls of Markets