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26 Mar
Zoom
Mar 26, 2021 | 12:30 PM-2:30 PM

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New Ideas in Critical Disaster Studies and Climate Change: Jacqueline Patterson

New Ideas in Climate Change and Critical Disaster Studies

For the second in the New Ideas in Critical Disaster Studies and Climate Change Series, join us for a lecture from Jacqueline Patterson, the Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program, with a discussion of disaster, climate change, and environmental justice. Patterson, the senior director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program, is also the coordinator and co-founder of Women of Color United. She has worked as a researcher, program manager, coordinator, advocate and activist working on women’s rights, violence against women, HIV/AIDS, racial justice, economic justice, and environmental and climate justice. She has written many articles, reports, and book chapters on climate justice, climate change as a Civil Rights issue, the gendered and racial dimensions of disaster, and civil and human rights challenges in the context of emergency events. Patterson will be introduced by Jacob Remes, Director of the Initiative for Critical Disaster Studies.

 

Critical disaster studies is an emergent interdisciplinary field in the social sciences and humanities that takes as its starting point that the very category of disaster is constructed, a political distinction that designates some suffering as normal and some as abnormal. Critical disaster scholars aspire to understand the experience and politics of people who are most at risk of this suffering, and to foster and contribute to their efforts to build more just, equal, and safe communities. The new Initiative for Critical Disaster Studies at NYU Gallatin seeks to foster this emergent field both within NYU and in the broader academy. To celebrate the launch of the Initiative, have invited three thinkers, organizers, and activists to share their New Ideas in Climate Change and Critical Disaster Studies.